Green Glowing Monkeys

Arnoud van den Heuvel
May 30th 2009

Japanese researchers of the Central Institute for Experimental Animals, took a green fluorescent protein gene of a jellyfish, wove it into the DNA of a few marmosets embryos, then let the monkeys mate. Five of 91 baby monkeys carried the gene. This was done before to mice, pigs, cats and dogs, but the marmosets are a particularly big breakthrough for a few reasons:

Monkeys are more genetically similar to humans than any other creature engineered to shine green; Their blood, hair roots and skin give off a glow, not just one body tissue (as with previous experiments); Monkey brains are bigger and more similar to human thinking caps that those of mice, which makes them better to study for neurological disorders, like Parkinsons disease.

News about green-reflecting monkeys is cute, but at NextNature we are waiting for the first human baby to see the green light.

Via: wired.com | Related: Brainbow Mice | No Transparent Frog | New Organisms 2007

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Should men be able to give birth to children?


Lisa Mandemaker: Using an artificial womb could lead to more equality between sexes, but also between different family layouts. If men would be able to give birth to children, it would maybe be easier for male same-sex couples to have a child together.

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