Clothes from a Can

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
September 23rd 2010

Frequent readers of this website might be familiar with our claim that Next Nature emerges from a fusion between the Born and the Made. But now we can add another: the fusion of the Sewn and the Grown. Cheesy wordplay or not, fact is that this Spray-on Fabric changes your perception of what clothing is or should be. It becomes more grown, and less made.

The product – an instant, sprayable, non-woven fabric – was created some years ago by Fabrican and developed through a collaboration between Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art, London (UK). After spraying the liquid, the fabric kind of grows itself. A model that tested the fabric on her skin reportedly said it ‘felt like a second skin’.

You can probably imagine the implications of this product, except it’s aesthetic appeal to hip designers all over the world: from First Aid Clothing Spray for emergency situations like floods and earthquakes to Sex toys to Auto-dressing Cabins for the elderly and the disabled. Clothing will be something you buy from a supermarket shelf and when you travel, you only need to breng some extra cans. But most importantly: you will never have to wash your clothes again – the ultimate disposable material in a throwaway society? Well, the self-sprayed clothing can be recycled by tearing it to pieces and mix it with a substance that makes the fabric liquid again.

Spiderman, eat your heart out.

Movieclip about the Spray-on T-Shirt

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Leonard Kevin Moberg®
Posted 10/10/2010 – 13:35

This is one of my Investigations. ©All rights re­served by Leonard Kevin Moberg®

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
Posted 25/09/2010 – 03:57

Wow! Thanks divide, I wish all our readers provided us with quotes from world literature related to our posts. No kidding – this is great!

divide
Posted 24/09/2010 – 20:37

Stanisław Lem invented this in "Return from the Stars" fifty years ago:
"With the clothes I had no luck. Of what I knew, almost nothing existed. At any rate, I discovered the secret of those mysterious bottles at the hotel, in the compartment with the sign "Bathrobes." Not only robes of that kind, but suits, socks, sweaters, underwear - everything was sprayed on. I could see how that might appeal to women, because by discharging from a few or a few dozen bottles a liquid that immediately set into fabrics with textures smooth or rough--velvet, fur, or pliable metal--they could have a new creation every time, each for one occasion only. Of course, not every woman did this for herself: there were special plasting salons (so that was what Nais did!), but the tight-fitting fashion that resulted from this did not much appeal to me...
"I stood with my arms raised and he set to work, spraying from four bottles at once. The liquid in the air, white like foam, set almost instantaneously. From it arose sweaters of various colors..."

Should men be able to give birth to children?


Lisa Mandemaker: Using an artificial womb could lead to more equality between sexes, but also between different family layouts. If men would be able to give birth to children, it would maybe be easier for male same-sex couples to have a child together.

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