Now Wait, Did Tanks Have Lasers WWII?

Van Mensvoort
December 1st 2014

Recent World War II movie Fury is arguably the most immersive portrayal of WWII since Steven Spielbergs Saving Private Ryan. Both films portray the ghastly violence of war – and what it can do to the human body – realistically and with fine detail.

In Fury the viewer teams up with the battle-hardened crew of a Sherman tank out a deadly mission behind enemy lines. Tank is commanded by Brad Pitt, in what seems to be a watered down version of his Inglorious Bastards character. Get popcorn! Although you may loose your appetite during the film. Fury does a great job at making you feel you as if you actually are inside the claustrophobic Sherman tank, surrounded by Nazi's out to kill you.

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Surprisingly, the ghastly realism of the film is pushed in a hyperrealistic overdrive with Star Wars style laser special effects of the shooting tanks and guns. At first you wonder if tank artillery is, in fact, visible as a laser like effect on the battlefield. Perhaps it just has never been portrayed that realistically before, no?

Once you notice that our hero's lasers are red, while German artillery it is depicted with green lasers, you realize you are still in the game. You know nothing of war.

Unsure if the laser game aesthetics were deliberately chosen to cater the gaming generation, or simply because games and movies nowadays have the special effect wizards. Go see that movie if you are out for a hyperrealistic WOII experience.

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Waffle
Posted 19/09/2017 – 21:53

They're called tracers and they're caused by the same effect that creates motion blur in cameras and our human perception: exposure time. They very much exist in real life.

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