What Is Next Nature? #10

Ingmar Nieuweboer
July 15th 2016

One and a half century ago birds and insects were the only airborne creatures. The largest movements in the sky were, for example, swarms of starlings, migrating geese or a lone circling hawk. From the twentieth century a new entrant made its rise: aircrafts. Today 8.3 million people are held aloft by airplanes everyday. Commercial air traffic accounts for the 4% of the total global output of greenhouse gasses. Indeed, the impact on the environment is clearly visible and widespread. Near urban areas a clear blue sky without contrails is close to non-existent. Not only airplanes have become part of the visible and audible horizon, they also directly transform our landscape by creating cirrus cloud formations.

Read the entire Next Nature is... series.

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What is your view on the coronavirus?


Siri Beerends: I really embrace the idea that viruses can teach us a lesson in modesty. It is necessary that our position as the dominant species on the planet is being challenged. I also agree that it is a mistake to think that we are becoming Gods. But unfortunately, this is actually what is happening now. Corona doesn’t teach us to be modest, it teaches us how we can -as quickly as possible- go back to business as usual: saving our capitalistic economy.

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