296 results for “Biomimicmarketing”

How animal filters unmask the estranged relation to our wild self

Meike Schipper
November 6th 2018

Would you like a dog snout, cat eyes or fluffy bunny ears? The choice is yours. Virtual selfie filters have become a widespread phenomenon on social media platforms such as Snapchat and Instagram. But what kind of self do these animal filters show us?…

The bananaphone, part deux

Kelly Streekstra
March 15th 2018

Feeding our decades old bananaphone kidsplay, Nokia just reintroduced their banana phone. Once again, this shows that Nature is the most successful product of our time. We call this phenomenon Bio-mimic-marketing: using images of nature to market a product. Peculiar image of the week.…

Beatles Zebra Crossing

Van Mensvoort
November 10th 2017
Realize it's metaphors we live by.

Air Purifying Billboards

Ruben Baart
April 5th 2017
These blue eco-boards are turning California a bit greener.

Protect Your Phone With a Watermelon

Ruben Baart
March 29th 2017
Watermelons are the new phone cases?

How a Hummingbird Creates Green Energy

Michelle Guenne
February 14th 2017
A start-up company build a wind turbine inspired by the hummingbird.

Recharge! Sun for Your Brain Cells

Julie Reindl
January 12th 2017
A gadget called HumanCharger promises "the sun in your pocket" to give you energy, by beaming light through your ears.

Pandas Crossing the Sky

Alejandro Alvarez
January 11th 2017
China is famous for its Panda bear reserves and breeding centers, so riding one the work just seems the most natural thing to do.

Next Nature Gift Guide 2016

NextNature.net
December 8th 2016
Here is a the Next Nature gift Guide 2016.

Animal Fauxtography

Alejandro Alvarez
November 3rd 2016
Fake photography, or fauxtography, has been around since the invention of cameras and nature is one of the most popular subjects of dishonest photographers.
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Would you like a dog snout, cat eyes or fluffy bunny ears? The choice is yours. Virtual selfie filters have become a widespread phenomenon on social media platforms such as Snapchat and Instagram. But what kind of self do these animal filters show us?

"Animal filters are not about animals. They are about humans."

Photo-editing is nothing new, and selfie enhancing software is omnipresent. Face filters herald an evolution of photo-editing as they are based on the technology of augmented reality - which enables real-time editing.

When you take a selfie with Snapchat or Instagram, the mobile camera recognizes the appearance of your face and instantly augments a layer on top. These augmenting technologies merge the virtual representation of our human face with the simulation of, for example, an animal.

The reach of those filters goes beyond augmentation, which has become evident with the rise of Snapchat dysmorphia as a result of beautifying filters. They largely shape our experience of self. But what is the deal with those cute animal filters?

Humanizing wild nature

When you think about face filters, chances are, you think about the classic Snapchat dog snout: face filters and the depiction of animals are fascinatingly interconnected.

Similar to how we humanize our pets and dress up our cats and dogs, we humanize wild animals by making them into cute and aesthetic filters. And while real nature might be scary and unpredictable, animal filters are not. They are a clear record of our estranged relationship with wild nature.

Rather than hairy, strong and wild, animal filters look fluffy and cute.

The majority of animal filters additionally add makeup, enlarge the eyes and make the chin smaller. These are conventions of female beauty, that stem specifically from the Asian notion of cuteness or kawaii.

Kawaii is based on the infantilizing of facial characteristics and is increasingly influencing Western beauty ideals. As humans, we are attracted to large eyes and round faces because they resemble babies.

The cuteness of babies and animals instinctively triggers our urge to take care of them. Portraying yourself as a cute animal might thus be a very effective - and somehow even natural - way to appear more likeable.

Bio-mimicking our self(ie)

Animal filters are a selective and aesthetic form of biomimicry. Nature has an aura of authenticity and beauty and is a terrific marketing tool. We call this phenomenon biomimicmarketing: using images of nature to market a product.

Mostly, the product itself has nothing to do with its natural reference: Lacoste is not about crocodiles, Linux is not about penguins, Bacardi is not about bats and Apple is certainly not a fruit company. Similarly, animal filters are not about animals. They are about humans.

We use the aesthetics and specific cute qualities of animals to optimize our personal image. It seems like animal filters give us the opportunity to play with the notion of being an animal, but instead they reinforce the boundaries of human beauty norms.

I am not an animal

The cute versus wild paradox is illustrating the human experience of nature in our contemporary society. The use of animal filters is actually emphasizing that “I am not an animal, therefore I can pretend to be one”.

Contrary to our first hunch, animal filters do not bring us closer to animals. Instead, they enable us to distance ourselves from the species we do not belong to. The humanized animal filters are reinforcing our anthropocentric worldview, in which humans are the center of existence and largely distanced from animals.

We all love face filters, but we prefer to stay far away from our wild, beasty self.

[post_title] => How animal filters unmask the estranged relation to our wild self [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-wild-selfie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 16:22:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 15:22:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91556 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 80872 [post_author] => 1510 [post_date] => 2018-03-15 09:00:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-15 08:00:55 [post_content] => Feeding our decades old bananaphone kidsplay, Nokia just reintroduced their banana phone. Once again, this shows that Nature is the most successful product of our time. We call this phenomenon Bio-mimic-marketing: using images of nature to market a product. Peculiar image of the week. [post_title] => The bananaphone, part deux [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => banana [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-16 09:43:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-16 08:43:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=80872 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77814 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2017-11-10 10:00:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-10 08:00:34 [post_content] => Sometimes our peculiar image of the week is simply weird and in-explainable. Indulge in these virtual Beatles trying to pass on a Zebra crossing. Figure it out dear intelligent readers. It's metaphors we all live by. Peculiar indeed. Source unknown. [post_title] => Beatles Zebra Crossing [post_excerpt] => Realize it's metaphors we live by. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => beatles-zebra-crossing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-08 15:38:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-08 13:38:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77814/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72778 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-04-05 08:44:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-05 07:44:14 [post_content] => Trees play an essential role for the planet, they purify the air we breathe. Needless to say that trees don't have lungs like humans, they “breathe” through a process known as photosynthesis. Now what if we tell you that a new tree species series of billboards appeared in and around Los Angeles and San Francisco that does exactly that?To be fair, the Air-Cleaning Eco-Board by Toyota does not “breathe” like a tree does. Its titanium dioxide coating layer acts like an air purifier, similar to the catalytic converter in a car. Using light, humidity and wind, the coating reacts with the nitrogen dioxide in the air. This reaction then clears the nitrogen, leaving the oxygen behind.According to the company press release, 37 billboards or “24,960 square feet of pollution scrubbing surfaces” were installed for a period of eight weeks to reverse the equivalent of 5.285 vehicles worth of nitrogen dioxide emissions per month. If the ad campaign will hold its end of the bargain up is hard to say. In any case, the blue eco-boards are definitely turning California a bit greener.Source: Digital Trends [post_title] => Air Purifying Billboards [post_excerpt] => These blue eco-boards are turning California a bit greener. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => air-purifying-billboards [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 09:03:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 08:03:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72778/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72692 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-03-29 09:55:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-29 08:55:35 [post_content] => Some phone cases offer drip protection, some are waterproof, and some... contain 92 percent of water! Protect your device from daily hazards with this DIY phone case and make a refreshing impression this summer. It even provides a rich amount of vitamins and takes care of your hydration levels - what does your phone cover do? As history has taught us, smartphones and fruits are an effective combination, whether it's a Blackberry headset, an Apple iPhone or a watermelon phone case; nature finds a way.Peculiar image via Tom Galle. [post_title] => Protect Your Phone With a Watermelon [post_excerpt] => Watermelons are the new phone cases? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => watermelon-phone-case [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-29 09:55:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-29 08:55:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72692/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71125 [post_author] => 1325 [post_date] => 2017-02-14 12:07:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-14 11:07:17 [post_content] => Tunisian start-up Tyer Wind developed a wind turbine inspired by nature, and in particular by the smallest and most efficient bird in the world, the hummingbird.It is the only bird that can hover by flapping its wings in a figure-eight forming pattern. Tyer Wind used biomimicry principles to replicate the mechanical action of hummingbird wings.The start-up co-founder Anis Aouini invented a technology called Aouinian 3D-Kinematic, which became the fundamental part of this wind turbine.Tyer Wind's wind turbine differs from traditions rotor-based wind turbines because instead of converting linear motion into a circular motion, it generates energy on both the upstroke and the downstroke. The design imitates the hovering of the hummingbirds, making the wind turbines blend fully into nature."This opens new horizons regarding the way electricity could be produced in the future. Major U.S. research centers have extensively worked on the hummingbird's aerodynamic behavior and confirmed that it is more efficient than bladed rotors” said Aouini. Another asset - and maybe the best one - is that this wind turbine is probably one of the most beautiful wind turbines designed so far.Source: Seeker. Image: Tyer Wind [post_title] => How a Hummingbird Creates Green Energy [post_excerpt] => A start-up company build a wind turbine inspired by the hummingbird. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hummingbird-creates-green-energy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-14 12:08:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-14 11:08:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71125/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70455 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-01-12 13:17:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-12 12:17:17 [post_content] => Feeling tired, unproductive, hungry or even scared? This might be due to the reduced daytime light! Thanks to HumanCharger, your sun lacking office bodies are now able to get charged by a light that is channeled directly in to your brain.Invented in Finland, a country where daylight is rare in winter time, HumanCharger is a bright light therapy portable gadget that transmits UV-free blue-enriched white light to the light-sensitive parts of the brain. The use of the device for 12 minutes a day is supposed to help you boost your attention, create a better mood and recharge your human batteries.Even though our Earth is getting warmer, that doesn’t mean we spend more time outdoors. Our environment is shifting to the inside and with that the source of natural light gets less used. As the human cells adjust their activity with the sun, a light shortage can be responsible for several unpleasant effects you probably haven’t thought of: from sleep deprivation to a lust for carbohydrates, for instance.HumanCharger
Back in the 1980s the bright light therapy was the new thing, although this method takes up to three hours to be effective. At that time the general consensus was that light could only be absorbed through the eye. Now researches at the University of Oulu know better. They discovered the existence of photoreceptor proteins on the surface of our brain, very similar to those occurring in our eyes. Yet this opens up the possibility to send light to the brain tissue through the ear canals. The handy iPod look-alike HumanCharger uses this advantage to keep the human motivated, happy, productive, charged day and night.Source: HumanCharger
[post_title] => Recharge! Sun for Your Brain Cells [post_excerpt] => A gadget called HumanCharger promises "the sun in your pocket" to give you energy, by beaming light through your ears. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => recharge-sun-brain-cells [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-14 18:01:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-14 17:01:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70455/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70153 [post_author] => 874 [post_date] => 2017-01-11 10:30:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-11 09:30:19 [post_content] => If Japan has cat-buses, why China can't have panda-trains? A new network of skytrains is set to debut this year in the Chinese city of Chengdu. But, why pandas? Well, the city is famous for its Panda bear reserves and breeding centers, so riding one the work just seems the most natural thing to do.Peculiar image of the week via Next Shark. [post_title] => Pandas Crossing the Sky [post_excerpt] => China is famous for its Panda bear reserves and breeding centers, so riding one the work just seems the most natural thing to do. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pandas-crossing-sky [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-11 10:06:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-11 09:06:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70153 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69144 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 10:00:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 09:00:58 [post_content] => It’s that time of year again. The season of gift giving is upon us and to help out those who are struggling to find that perfect gift for that special someone we have brought together a collection of Next Nature inspired gifts. Whether you need something for a family member addicted to tech, or an older eco hippy relative we’ve got you covered. Please enjoy our Next Nature gift guide 2016.For the Tech Connoisseur: New Mac candlemac_candleWe all know that one apple fan that will do anything to get his/her hands on the latest gear but those new products can be mighty expensive. Luckily this candle is the next best thing by delivering that fresh out-of-the-box Mac smell.For the Beauty Biologist: Gallinee La Culture06daf50831c51965b159d9066813787e_originalSkincare has never been more alive than with Gallinee. It’s a new beauty brand that focuses on the body’s bacterial ecosystem, the microbiome. By using a combination of prebiotics, probiotics and lactic acid their first range of products, aptly called “la culture”, helps restore the skins true balance delivering protected, glowing and healthy skin.For the Pet Paparazzi: Pooch Selfie16_09_06_POOCH_702_1024x1024Do you know a dog that needs its social media presence boosted? Is its doggy Instagram account dwindling in popularity? Well it's time to fix that with the Pooch Selfie smartphone attachment. This helps pet owners take better pictures and selfies with their dogs.For the Coder Kid: LittleBitsphpdxd43pIt’s never too early to start learning or even building your own robots. Littlebits is designed specifically for children aged 8 and up to invent and build their own gadgets from a range of electronic building blocks that simply snap together using magnets.For the Sustainable Sneakerhead: Adidas Parley388774-e1436216560482There have been a number of new and more sustainable sneakers launched this year but there is one that stands out above the rest. Adidas teamed up with Parley for the Oceans to create the first sneaker made from plastics that were recovered from the ocean and wow do they look beautiful. Any sneakerhead would be proud to add this to his collection.For the Day Dreamer: Daydream VR4545We all daydream now and then, but for those who want to make a carrier out of it the Google Daydream VR headset is definitely the place to start. It is compatible with a number of mobile phones and with an intuitive controller you can escape to anywhere from anywhere.For the Luxury Pioneer: Autonomous Ariel VehiclemaxresdefaultOkay this one might be a bit out of the price range but who wouldn’t want a personal flying passenger drone? The autonomous aerial vehicle is a medium to short distance, which is perfect for avoiding those annoying traffic jams.For the Connected Teenager: Smart Duvetbc583f4bcb9130d_bea3bbdc037d049f5cf69db7f4f806c7Teenagers can be very difficult to buy for. Who knows what goes on in their growing minds? One thing is at least consistent: they love to sleep but not all of them are fans of making the bed. With this new smart duvet they will never have to again. It does the bed making all by itself!For the Internet Fashionista: Stock Appareladobe-apparel-7Stock photos and apparel wear are a match made in heaven. Who doesn’t want to walk around with iconic images of the Internet emblazoned on their jumper. You can pick from a wide range, from the heartwarming “happy senior couple piggybacking at the beach” to the much loved “call centre woman wearing headset”. They have limited stock (no pun intended) so hurry.For the Coffee Hunter: Goat MugGoat-Story-Alt-HeroThis gift is perfect for the coffee addicted nomad. This stylish coffee mug is a dedication to the goats who discovered coffee way before humans. Using the ergonomic shape of the goat horn also allows it to be carried around wherever you go so you can skip on those wasteful single use coffee cups.For the Unlucky Biker: SkunklockskunklockThere is nothing worse than returning to the place that you parked your bike only to see a broken lock lying on the floor. That is until the invention of the skunklock. The lock is manufactured from the strongest materials available, but it goes one step further. Inside there is a secret series of chemical compounds so that when the lock is tampered with it lets off a “vomit inducing” odor. Bike thieves beware!And finally, for the Culinary Crusader: In-Vitro Meat Cookbookkweekvlees-kookboek-2The In-Vitro Meat Cookbook is a great gift for more adventurous cooks who care about sustainability. It is a visually stunning exploration of the new “food cultures” lab-grown meat might create. The recipes are beautifully illustrated and supplemented with articles, interviews and special features about today’s meat and the meat of tomorrow.We hope this short guide has helped you on your way to getting the best Next Nature gifts out there. Happy Holidays!  [post_title] => Next Nature Gift Guide 2016 [post_excerpt] => Here is a the Next Nature gift Guide 2016. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => next-nature-gift-guide-2016 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-07 12:48:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-07 11:48:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69144 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 67930 [post_author] => 874 [post_date] => 2016-11-03 14:34:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-03 12:34:51 [post_content] => Fake photography, or fauxtography, has been around since the invention of cameras and nature is one of the most popular subjects of dishonest photographers. From the mythical Loch Ness to the cheesy frogs using a leaf as umbrella, these images have been published in newspapers and spread virally on the web creating a fake perception of nature in the mind of millions around the world.These bogus creations go beyond using photo manipulation softwares, common techniques involve staging scenes with unusual pets in unnatural positions or luring wildlife with food to achieve the desired effects. This apparently harmless activity can have serious effects on the subjects, as experts have pointed, the animals show signs of distress in many of these photos.In addition to the distress caused to the subject, there’s the false image promoted by these pictures, especially when they go viral. Websites, such as Snopes, post various sections dedicated to this phenomenon and specialized webpages and facebook groups have flourished with the purpose of debunking this kind of images and promoting a scientific understanding of nature unbiased by emotional staging. As the site Truths About Fake Nature Photography puts it: "nature is already so intriguing and beautiful on its own, that staging such unnatural scenes is an insult to mother nature herself".But the charm of these cute images is so strong to beat their falsehood, in 2014 the Sony World Photography Awards shortlisted one of these now cliché photos of a frog riding a beetle. Real or not, nature definitely sells.Source: The Verge [post_title] => Animal Fauxtography [post_excerpt] => Fake photography, or fauxtography, has been around since the invention of cameras and nature is one of the most popular subjects of dishonest photographers. 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Would you like a dog snout, cat eyes or fluffy bunny ears? The choice is yours. Virtual selfie filters have become a widespread phenomenon on social media platforms such as Snapchat and Instagram. But what kind of self do these animal filters show us?

"Animal filters are not about animals. They are about humans."

Photo-editing is nothing new, and selfie enhancing software is omnipresent. Face filters herald an evolution of photo-editing as they are based on the technology of augmented reality - which enables real-time editing.

When you take a selfie with Snapchat or Instagram, the mobile camera recognizes the appearance of your face and instantly augments a layer on top. These augmenting technologies merge the virtual representation of our human face with the simulation of, for example, an animal.

The reach of those filters goes beyond augmentation, which has become evident with the rise of Snapchat dysmorphia as a result of beautifying filters. They largely shape our experience of self. But what is the deal with those cute animal filters?

Humanizing wild nature

When you think about face filters, chances are, you think about the classic Snapchat dog snout: face filters and the depiction of animals are fascinatingly interconnected.

Similar to how we humanize our pets and dress up our cats and dogs, we humanize wild animals by making them into cute and aesthetic filters. And while real nature might be scary and unpredictable, animal filters are not. They are a clear record of our estranged relationship with wild nature.

Rather than hairy, strong and wild, animal filters look fluffy and cute.

The majority of animal filters additionally add makeup, enlarge the eyes and make the chin smaller. These are conventions of female beauty, that stem specifically from the Asian notion of cuteness or kawaii.

Kawaii is based on the infantilizing of facial characteristics and is increasingly influencing Western beauty ideals. As humans, we are attracted to large eyes and round faces because they resemble babies.

The cuteness of babies and animals instinctively triggers our urge to take care of them. Portraying yourself as a cute animal might thus be a very effective - and somehow even natural - way to appear more likeable.

Bio-mimicking our self(ie)

Animal filters are a selective and aesthetic form of biomimicry. Nature has an aura of authenticity and beauty and is a terrific marketing tool. We call this phenomenon biomimicmarketing: using images of nature to market a product.

Mostly, the product itself has nothing to do with its natural reference: Lacoste is not about crocodiles, Linux is not about penguins, Bacardi is not about bats and Apple is certainly not a fruit company. Similarly, animal filters are not about animals. They are about humans.

We use the aesthetics and specific cute qualities of animals to optimize our personal image. It seems like animal filters give us the opportunity to play with the notion of being an animal, but instead they reinforce the boundaries of human beauty norms.

I am not an animal

The cute versus wild paradox is illustrating the human experience of nature in our contemporary society. The use of animal filters is actually emphasizing that “I am not an animal, therefore I can pretend to be one”.

Contrary to our first hunch, animal filters do not bring us closer to animals. Instead, they enable us to distance ourselves from the species we do not belong to. The humanized animal filters are reinforcing our anthropocentric worldview, in which humans are the center of existence and largely distanced from animals.

We all love face filters, but we prefer to stay far away from our wild, beasty self.

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