283 results for “Bionics”

This brain-controlled exoskeleton allows a paralyzed man to walk again

Freya Hutchings
October 7th 2019

A breakthrough technology that responds to signals from the brain has transformed the life of a paralyzed 28-year-old man called Thibault. Four years after the initial incident that paralysed him, Thibault is walking again. Thanks to a combination of revolutionary technology and immense brain power, he is able to operate a full-body exoskeleton.

“When you are in my position, when you can’t do anything with your body […] I wanted to do something with my brain,” Thibault said.

This is …

The age of cyborgs has arrived

Vanessa Bates Ramirez
October 31st 2018

How many cyborgs did you see during your morning commute today? I would guess at least five. Did they make you nervous? Probably not; you likely didn’t even realize they were there.…

If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose?

Meike Schipper
June 26th 2018

Color-blind artist Neil Harbisson designed a brain-implanted antenna that converts colors into sound. This enables him to hear colors he cannot see, and extends his vision to ultraviolets and infrareds. As technology is rapidly advancing, and the boundaries between the body and technology are blurred and ambiguous, it seems plausible that humans will use technologies not only to enhance, but also to extend their physical capabilities. …

Smart Ring Turns Thumb Gestures into Words and Numbers

Belen Munoz
January 22nd 2018
From the Georgia Institute of Technology arrives FingerSound, a smart ring that recognizes thumb gestures and converts them into words and numbers.

Hire a Smart Robot

Daniel Fraga
October 25th 2017
What if your co-worker was a robot? Dutch startup Smart Robotics is a job agency for robots that allows you to hire a smart-robot.

Add-on Body Parts: Bionic Thumb

Charlotte Kuijpers
September 20th 2017
Royal College of Art graduate Dani Clode reframed prosthetics as extensions of the body, rather than replacements for missing parts.

Jobs for Entrepreneurs – Robots at Work #4

Mathilde Nakken
March 3rd 2017
This is post number four of our serie 'Robots at Work'. In this episode we present you five jobs for entrepreneurs, the ones who love doing big business.

Personhood Status for Robots

Julie Reindl
February 11th 2017
An "electronic personhood" for robots has been discussed in the European Parliament recently, raising big questions about equality, citizenship, legal and ironically, human rights for artificial intelligent machines.

Sexy Cyborg Sports Her Prosthetic Limb

Van Mensvoort
January 8th 2017
The Brazilian model Paola Antonini uses her Instagram to show off her prosthetic limb.

Explore Depths from Your Chair

Mathilde Nakken
January 7th 2017
To explore deep sea Standfort University developed OceanOne: a humanoid diving robot, which at the same time creates a simulation of the underwater experience on land.
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A breakthrough technology that responds to signals from the brain has transformed the life of a paralyzed 28-year-old man called Thibault. Four years after the initial incident that paralysed him, Thibault is walking again. Thanks to a combination of revolutionary technology and immense brain power, he is able to operate a full-body exoskeleton.

“When you are in my position, when you can’t do anything with your body […] I wanted to do something with my brain,” Thibault said.

This is where the process began. He first trained his brain by using a video game avatar to help him develop the skills needed to operate an exoskeleton - this involved a long process of completely relearning and visualizing natural movements.

Thibault’s brain signals were then recorded by two devices, implanted either side of his head, between the brain and the skin. These read his sensorimotor cortex, the part of the brain that controls motor function.

Professor Alim Louis Benabid, leader of the trial at Grenoble Alps Hospital explains, “The brain is still capable of generating commands that would normally move the arms and legs, there’s just nothing to carry them out.'' This is where technology was able to provide the final piece of the puzzle. Moving from avatar to exoskeleton, over many training sessions Thibault has covered the distance of one and a half football pitches.

Experts involved in the study say their research may lead to the production of brain-controlled wheelchairs - a possibility revolutionary for those with restricted mobility. Thibault says the trial offers “a message of hope to people like me.”

This huge achievement disrupts morbid predictions of man being controlled by technology. Instead, therapeutic uses of this kind give us a positive model for creating technologies that facilitate human agency and determination in life-enriching ways.

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How many cyborgs did you see during your morning commute today? I would guess at least five. Did they make you nervous? Probably not; you likely didn’t even realize they were there.

In a presentation titled “Biohacking and the Connected Body” at Singularity University Global Summit, Hannes Sjoblad informed the audience that we’re already living in the age of cyborgs. Sjoblad is co-founder of the Sweden-based biohacker network Bionyfiken, a chartered non-profit that unites DIY-biologists, hackers, makers, body modification artists and health and performance devotees to explore human-machine integration.

The regular cyborg

Sjoblad said the cyborgs we see today don’t look like Hollywood prototypes; they’re regular people who have integrated technology into their bodies to improve or monitor some aspect of their health. Sjoblad defined biohacking as applying hacker ethic to biological systems. Some biohackers experiment with their biology with the goal of taking the human body’s experience beyond what nature intended.

Smart insulin monitoring systems, pacemakers, bionic eyes, and Cochlear implants are all examples of biohacking, according to Sjoblad. He told the audience, “We live in a time where, thanks to technology, we can make the deaf hear, the blind see, and the lame walk.” He is convinced that while biohacking could conceivably end up having Brave New World-like dystopian consequences, it can also be leveraged to improve and enhance our quality of life in multiple ways.

Biohacking our health

The field where biohacking can make the most positive impact is health. In addition to pacemakers and insulin monitors, several new technologies are being developed with the goal of improving our health and simplifying access to information about our bodies.

Ingestibles are a type of smart pill that use wireless technology to monitor internal reactions to medications, helping doctors determine optimum dosage levels and tailor treatments to different people. Your body doesn’t absorb or process medication exactly as your neighbor’s does, so shouldn’t you each have a treatment that works best with your unique system? Colonoscopies and endoscopies could one day be replaced by miniature pill-shaped video cameras that would collect and transmit images as they travel through the digestive tract.

Hacking everyday life

Security is another area where biohacking could be beneficial. One example Sjoblad gave was personalization of weapons: an invader in your house couldn’t fire your gun because it will have been matched to your fingerprint or synced with your body so that it only responds to you.

Biohacking can also simplify everyday tasks. In an impressive example of walking the walk rather than just talking the talk, Sjoblad had an NFC chip implanted in his hand. The chip contains data from everything he used to have to carry around in his pockets: credit and bank card information, key cards to enter his office building and gym, business cards, and frequent shopper loyalty cards. When he’s in line for a morning coffee or rushing to get to the office on time, he doesn’t have to root around in his pockets or bag to find the right card or key; he just waves his hand in front of a sensor and he’s good to go.

Evolved from radio frequency identification (RFID)—an old and widely distributed technology—NFC chips are activated by another chip, and small amounts of data can be transferred back and forth. No wireless connection is necessary. Sjoblad sees his NFC implant as a personal key to the Internet of Things, a simple way for him to talk to the smart, connected devices around him.

Extending our senses

Sjoblad isn’t the only person who feels a need for connection.When British science writer Frank Swain realized he was going to go deaf, he decided to hack his hearing to be able to hear Wi-Fi. Swain developed software that tunes into wireless communication fields and uses an inbuilt Wi-Fi sensor to pick up router name, encryption modes and distance from the device. This data is translated into an audio stream where distant signals click or pop, and strong signals sound their network ID in a looped melody. Swain hears it all through an upgraded hearing aid.

Global datastreams can also become sensory experiences. Spanish artist Moon Ribas developed and implanted a chip in her elbow that is connected to the global monitoring system for seismographic sensors; each time there’s an earthquake, she feels it through vibrations in her arm.

You can feel connected to our planet, too: North Sense makes a “standalone artificial sensory organ” that connects to your body and vibrates whenever you’re facing north. It’s a built-in compass; you’ll never get lost again.

Future potential

Biohacking applications are likely to proliferate in the coming years, some of them more useful than others. But there are serious ethical questions that can’t be ignored during development and use of this technology. To what extent is it wise to tamper with nature, and who gets to decide?

Most of us are probably ok with waiting in line an extra 10 minutes or occasionally having to pull up a maps app on our phone if it means we don’t need to implant computer chips into our forearms. If it’s frightening to think of criminals stealing our wallets, imagine them cutting a chunk of our skin out to have instant access to and control over our personal data. The physical invasiveness and potential for something to go wrong seems to far outweigh the benefits the average person could derive from this technology.

But that may not always be the case. It’s worth noting the miniaturization of technology continues at a quick rate, and the smaller things get, the less invasive (and hopefully more useful) they’ll be. Even today, there are people already sensibly benefiting from biohacking. If you look closely enough, you’ll spot at least a couple cyborgs on your commute tomorrow morning.

Image Credit: IrelandsTechnologyBlog

This article originally appeared on Singularity Hub, a publication of Singularity University.

[post_title] => The age of cyborgs has arrived [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => age-of-cyborgs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 16:10:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 15:10:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91534 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 82102 [post_author] => 1666 [post_date] => 2018-06-26 11:10:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-26 10:10:57 [post_content] => Color-blind artist Neil Harbisson designed a brain-implanted antenna that converts colors into sound. This enables him to hear colors he cannot see, and extends his vision to ultraviolets and infrareds. As technology is rapidly advancing, and the boundaries between the body and technology are blurred and ambiguous, it seems plausible that humans will use technologies not only to enhance, but also to extend their physical capabilities.Of course, glasses and hearing-aids are technologies that are already commonly used to make up for sensory impairments. But what would happen if we take this a step further and, like Neil Harbisson, envision new technologies that cooperate with our body to create new senses that go beyond our current physical capabilities? If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose?[caption id="attachment_82181" align="alignnone" width="640"] Meet Hackers & Designers Juliette and Andre.[/caption]

Next Nature Lab: Next Senses

These questions were recently explored during the workshop 'Prototyping Next Senses'; a joint effort with NNN fellow Leanne Wijnsma and Amsterdam-based designer collective Hackers & Designers to challenge, reconceptualize and design human perception.Inspired by the specific qualities of animals and how they perceive the world, participants discussed the senses that they would like to possess. Frogs are for example able to absorb oxygen through their skin, elephants are sensitive to earthly vibrations and use them to communicate, bees are able to process ultraviolet light and sharks have the ability to sense electricity. Encouraged by the hands-on mentality of Hackers & Designers, the participants then started to deconstruct existing technological objects and use the materials to prototype new senses.[caption id="attachment_82182" align="alignnone" width="480"] Participant Stef envisioned Froxygen; this would enable humans to breathe and filter oxygen through their skin and spare the lungs of polluted air.[/caption]

Speculative futures, tangible prototypes

One of the prototypes created during the day was a wearable lightsource that sheds light on human emotions, and displays them to people who have trouble reading emotions and facial expressions of others, such as people on the autistic spectrum. This prototype started an interesting discussion regarding the relation between facial expressions and actual emotions. Are all emotions necessarily visible on the face? People who have trouble expressing their emotions could use the help of sensors connected to their heart rate and temperature, which became a new prototype. Based on the physical indicators of mood, a colored light could express feelings and even extend the experience of emotions beyond the existing human facial expressions.The skin of the frog inspired another group to prototype a similar skin for humans (pictured above). The Froxygen would enable humans to breathe and filter oxygen through their skin and spare the lungs of polluted air. This could be designed as a cyborg-like fashion statement, or invisibly integrated into the clothes that already are an accepted technology.Another group was inspired by pigs, who use their nose to dig through soil and sense the presence of plant-based food (pictured below). Wouldn’t it be great to sense the presence and exact contents of food without having to check the endless lists of ingredients? Using the simple yet vital technology of a fork, they prototyped a shapeshifting ‘sensible’ fork. The fork softens and becomes useless when it senses animal-based products, while it becomes functional when it senses plant-based food.[caption id="attachment_82184" align="alignnone" width="640"] At the end of the day all participants gathered around the physical model of The Pyramid of Technology.[/caption]

The Pyramid of Technology

Alongside Next Nature’s Pyramid of Technology, we started discussing if and how the envisioned senses could be made operational, applied and accepted. For instance, why did the Google Glass that extended our vision never make it to the accepted phase? Would people actually wear a frog-like skin, or use a sensible fork at dinner? Probably - and unfortunately -  most of these prototypes will probably remain in the envisioned stage for now, but they certainly are great conversation-starters already.The Next Nature workshop offered a platform for the exploratory thinking exhibited above. The aim for some participants was to imagine more speculative, or futuristic designs: “I want to master future-thinking”. Many wondered how to ensure this more forward thinking. How to alleviate the boundaries of our current ideas of technologies, which may limit envisioning process to the ‘knowns’ and target groups of today. One participant mentioned: “It is difficult to think creatively about technology, you quickly fall back on the technologies you already know”The Pyramid of Technology is the next nature tool to facilitate this process. Would you like to attend, or host such a workshop? Well, we recently started the NNN Academy! Through interactive workshops, we explore what it means to build, design, and live in the next nature. Facilitated by our Pyramid of Technology Toolkit, and led by a trained NNN guide, the workshops offer a new way to discuss technology, facilitate brainstorms and catalyze innovative processes. Want to know more? Then visit this page! [post_title] => If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => prototyping-next-senses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-28 14:20:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-28 13:20:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=82102 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79519 [post_author] => 1511 [post_date] => 2018-01-22 09:59:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-22 08:59:11 [post_content] => The relationship between humans and smart wearable devices has had its ups and downs. Although it is going in the right direction, it has not become a stable one quite yet. This could be partially due to the social awkwardness of wearing this type of technology in everyday situations. What’s more, users have already noticed some of its major drawbacks, such as typing messages on the tiny screen of a smartwatch.These obstacles were tackled by a team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who have introduced an alternative system that could succeed in integrating wearables into our daily life. FingerSound is a smart ring that recognizes thumb gestures and converts them into words and numbers. But unlike any other wearable device out there, there is no need for users to perform gestures in mid-air in order to make it work. It is equipped with a tiny microphone and a gyroscope sensor, so wearers only have to rub their thumbs against their fingers to activate the device.This ring is programmed to detect specific sounds and movements so that it can clearly identify when an intended gesture is made. This way it can “understand” whether one chooses to draw the shape of a number, a letter, or simply indicates a swiping direction (left, right, up, down) over the fingers. You don't even have to look directly at it to know what signal you want to send.FingerSound aims to be less invasive, much more subtle, and easier to use than other wearables. Cheng Zhang, creator of this ring-based gesture technology, believes in its potential to become a vital tool in our day-to-day activities: “A ring augments the fingers in a way that is fairly non-obstructive during daily activities. A ring is also socially acceptable, unlike other wearable input devices”,Sooner than you expect, you won’t need to interrupt a conversation when your smartphone rings, just whirl your thumb and send the call to voicemail. The smart ring, introduces a different kind of body language, providing a glimpse into a whole new set of possibilities of how our smart devices might evolve and engage with us in the near future.Source: Georgia Tech [post_title] => Smart Ring Turns Thumb Gestures into Words and Numbers [post_excerpt] => From the Georgia Institute of Technology arrives FingerSound, a smart ring that recognizes thumb gestures and converts them into words and numbers. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => smart-ring-turns-gestures-words-numbers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-22 10:07:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-22 09:07:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79519/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77223 [post_author] => 859 [post_date] => 2017-10-25 06:03:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-25 04:03:32 [post_content] => What if your co-worker was a robot? Dutch startup Smart Robotics is a job agency for robots that allows you to hire a smart machine. This new species can learn a variety of tasks and be configured to your needs. Ready to get working?

Robotic employees

Based in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, Smart Robotics offers innovative solutions for the workplace. It's an "employment agency for robots", as strange as this may sound. They provide robots as flexible, temporary workers; machines that can be programmed to perform specific tasks.The flexibility and smartness of these devices is what sets them apart from regular robots. They can be reconfigured and put to different uses over time. Also, through 3D cameras and advanced sensor technologies, they can navigate and adapt to the environment. Furthermore, their smart software gives them the ability to learn from their mistakes and optimize their performances - just like humans would. The company also provides frequent software updates, so that your robot can stay up to date with the latest advancements to guarantee optimal service.Another notable feature is that these robots are modular. This means their shape, components and features can be set up according to what is required. Adaptability and flexibility seem to be the most important aspects of Smart Robotics' designs.[caption id="attachment_77228" align="aligncenter" width="640"] The founders of Smart Robotics, Mark Menting and Heico Sandee.[/caption]This new kind of "worker" can operate in many different areas, such as assembly line work, product sorting, order picking - and whatever else you may want to program them to do. You can also decide to hire them by the hour to help with particular tasks in busy times for your company.

A new species in town: friend or foe?

Smart Robotics creates automated workplace solutions that can cooperate with humans. Their self-reliance and continuous adaptability bring them a step beyond mere robots - towards what can effectively be called a temporary worker. Below you can see a short video demonstration of the machine operating.[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nVBcMr5DBg[/youtube]Many claim that workplace automation is a recipe for disaster. And, in truth, it could have its downsides, like unemployment and labour uncertainty. The job market reached a touring point and change can also mean opportunity. What could the positive aspects of this upcoming robotic revolution be? How can these smart-robots make life better?Smart Robotics sheds light on the idea that these new robots can work like a new species. They can co-exist and cooperate with humans as friends, and allow us to reach previously unknown goals. Rather than tools that can make us obsolete, why not think of the smart-robot as a being with an end in itself?

Forward, not backward!

When humans domesticated horses, both species prospered. Horses were protected and multiplied. Humans gained the ability to travel across tens of thousands of miles in their lifetimes. Before our inter-species cooperation, this was not possible. Could we create a similar relationship with smart robots? What kind of future this symbiosis may bring?Robotization does not have to be only understood negatively. We must override its more dangerous aspects with new possibilities. By moving forward, we can find new opportunities in automation. Instead of being victims of a future that is yet to come, why don't we create it? Are your ready to work with a robot?Featured image: Ise Mag______________________________This article is part of the "HUBOT weeks" to contextualize our latest project HUBOT, the job agency for people and robots. Want to learn more about this project? Join NNN and we will keep you posted! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Hire a Smart Robot [post_excerpt] => What if your co-worker was a robot? Dutch startup Smart Robotics is a job agency for robots that allows you to hire a smart-robot. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hire-smart-robot [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 10:40:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 09:40:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77223/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77246 [post_author] => 1433 [post_date] => 2017-09-20 10:00:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-20 08:00:31 [post_content] => Playing an instrument, picking something up, holding your oversized phone in one hand. These are all things you might be better at if you’d have an extra thumb. By designing and creating The Third Thumb Project, Royal College of Art graduate Danielle Clode reframed prosthetics as extensions of the body, rather than replacements for missing parts.A 3D printer, pressure sensors, a Bluetooth connection and some servos. That’s all you need to get an additional finger and become a bionic human.Although having an extra thumb might not make us superhumans yet, The Third Thumb Project lets us reconsider the current use of prosthetics and our natural abilities. Instead of fixing disabilities, artificial body parts could enhance our skills.Prosthetics could be a useful accessory, a tool for self expression. Will we give a high six soon?Source: Dezeen [post_title] => Add-on Body Parts: Bionic Thumb [post_excerpt] => Royal College of Art graduate Dani Clode reframed prosthetics as extensions of the body, rather than replacements for missing parts. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bionic-thumb [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 10:54:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 08:54:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77246/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71168 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2017-03-03 11:50:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-03 10:50:39 [post_content] => How will your job look like in 2050? Join our design competition Empowered by Robots and share your vision on the job of the future. The winners will become part of HUBOT, the job agency for humans and robots. Here you can only find works where humans and robots have an ultimate collaboration. Need some inspiration? Take a look at our series Robots at Work! In this episode we present you five jobs for entrepreneurs, the ones who love doing big business.Lawyer Are you dreaming of setting up your own law firm in the future? Then you can reduce your staff costs. The purchase of an AI-colleague might be enough to get started. For example, the artificial lawyer ROSS can read dossiers and codes within seconds. As a lawyer you can spend more time in court, or build your relationships with clients.Shop assistent In 2012 robots started invading our stores, one of them was AndyVision, a robot able to organize the shop inventory. Nowadays you can also find robotic shop assistants. They can carry your products to the cash register and answer to your questions. It is just a pity that they are not able to bring your purchases home yet. We cannot wait for the shopping trolly drone to arrive.Gamer Do you want to become rich and play video games simultaneously? Hire a couple of gold farmers! Only the best players in online games like World of Warcraft, are making money in real life as well. With the help of the Chinese gold farmers you can get a few levels up while you are as sleep.Supermarket manager Coop Italia has opened a flagship store in Milan to present their vision of what grocery shopping might hold for us in 2050.Humans eat and they will keep doing that for a little while. Most of us "hunt" food at the supermarket. So why not open your own store? Grocery stores are getting more high-tech, see for example the interactive supermarket or the supermarket with no employees.Hotel owner Here some inspiration for hotel owners. You can now add an extra feature by opening the world's second robot hotel. To visit the first robot hotel you will have to book a room in Henn-na in Japan. Here you can check-in at the robotic resectionist. All services are robot driven in this hotel. Though, rumors say there are actually lots of real people running the hotel behind the scenes.Top image: Binary Option Alliance [post_title] => Jobs for Entrepreneurs - Robots at Work #4 [post_excerpt] => This is post number four of our serie 'Robots at Work'. In this episode we present you five jobs for entrepreneurs, the ones who love doing big business. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robots-at-work-4 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 10:31:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 09:31:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71168/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71108 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-02-11 10:23:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-11 09:23:46 [post_content] => Beating your robot might get you in real trouble with legal authorities in the near future. Recently the European Parliament discussed the introduction of an "electronic personhood" for robots. As personhood describes the status of being an actual person, this decision raises big questions about equality, citizenship, legal and ironically, human rights for artificial intelligent machines.Looking at history, from the old myth of Pygmalion, to Merry Shelley's Frankenstein, through Karel Čapek's first use of the word "robot", you will quickly notice that mankind has always had an obsession with building human like smart machines. Now more then ever intelligent robots are crafted and put on our planet, unleashing a new industrial insurgency affecting every corner of our world population. Mostly employed in big industrial factories, these smart machines are now also taking on responsibility in areas such as medical practice, personal care and instruction. Leaving behind a big question mark about human unemployment and a false dispersion of wealth.The planned legal status for artificial intelligent machines would be similar to the highly disputed corporate person hood allowing companies to participate in legal cases on both sides. Though this is not what the Parliament wants for the future. The expected regulations should also contain principles about the definition of "smart autonomous machines'', their registration and the use of an advisory code for robotic producers in order to ethically guide the design and employment of robotics. In the future robots owners might also face taxation and social security contributions, as well as insurance for possible damage caused by their new companions.In order to protect humans, European lawmakers have proposed to equip robots with emergency "kill switches". They must have been inspired by science fiction writer Isaac Asimov's rules for self-aware robots, which state that: a robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Also a robot must obey the orders given by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law. Followed by the third rule: a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the first or second rule. The laws discussed in science fiction decades ago are coming to life and building the framework for the actual legislation.Source: The GuradianBBCEuropean Parliament Image: AP Images/European Union-EP [post_title] => Personhood Status for Robots [post_excerpt] => An "electronic personhood" for robots has been discussed in the European Parliament recently, raising big questions about equality, citizenship, legal and ironically, human rights for artificial intelligent machines. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => personhood-status-robots [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-11 19:28:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-11 18:28:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71108/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70241 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2017-01-08 19:00:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-08 18:00:59 [post_content] => Instagram accounts with young girls featuring stunning selfies are hardly unusual. However, 21-year-old Paola Antonini’s popular IG account is certainly beyond the ordinary. The Brazilian model uses her Instagram to show off her prosthetic limb, the result of a tragic car accident in 2014 when Antonini was hit by a drunk driver.sexy cyborgsexy cyborg on the bedThe accident crushed her left leg and forced the doctors to amputate to the top of her thigh. Instead of hiding her prosthetic leg from the world, the model has decided to celebrate it and share her life with an amputated limb online. tumblr_inline_o4qtbp50sS1tt63u1_540sexy cyborgsAntonini posts photos of all aspects of her life on Instagram, from fittings for a new prosthetic leg to traveling, skateboarding and swimming. She now has 1.2 million followers and counting. sexy cyborgtumblr_inline_o4qtbwh6oV1tt63u1_540Most impressively, the model hasn’t put her career on hold. She continued modelling in hopes of inspiring other amputees. sexy cyborg modelHer story makes us realize that we should stop thinking of prosthetics as inferior body replacements. They are bound to become faster, better, stronger and perhaps even sexier than the real thing.Sources: Yahoo Beauty and Instagram [post_title] => Sexy Cyborg Sports Her Prosthetic Limb [post_excerpt] => The Brazilian model Paola Antonini uses her Instagram to show off her prosthetic limb. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sexy-cyborg-sports-prosthetic-limb [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-14 16:26:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-14 15:26:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70241 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69911 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2017-01-07 12:00:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-07 11:00:57 [post_content] => Over seventy percent of the Earth's surface is covered by water. Yet, we mainly discover the land, since this is the part of the globe we inhabit. But since our body is not able to dive to the bottom of the ocean, we could send a super copy of ourself to explore underwater worlds. Stanford University developed OceanOne, a humanoid diving robot that creates a simulation of the underwater experience on land.With regular scuba diving you have a limitation of 40 meters. To dive deeper you need a submarine which can go kilometers bellow sea level, though the closed space and maneuverability of the boats are big limitations. So the development of the OceanOne fills the gap between the sensibility of scuba diving and extreme conditions a submarine can handle.2With its stereo vision the OceanOne sends out realtime video to the land. Besides that, the humanoid diver is bimanual steered. The movements of the pilot are simulations executed by the robot. Meanwhile the robot hands contain lots of touch sensors, so you can recreate the touch on land. The simulation of sight and touch gives an extra layer of understanding of life below sea level, without physically going there.The first mission of the OceanOne is the exploration of a shipwreck ‘La Lune’ from 1664 on the French coast. Until now no-one entered the ship since it is laying a hundred meters deep. Next destinations might take place on dangerous spots like oil-rigs or delicate coral riffs.[youtube]http://youtu.be/p1HmgP9l4VY[/youtube]Soucre: Inhabitat. Image: Standfort University [post_title] => Explore Depths from Your Chair [post_excerpt] => To explore deep sea Standfort University developed OceanOne: a humanoid diving robot, which at the same time creates a simulation of the underwater experience on land. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => explore-depth-ocean-chair [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-09 09:44:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-09 08:44:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69911 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 122400 [post_author] => 2194 [post_date] => 2019-10-07 14:14:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-07 13:14:46 [post_content] =>

A breakthrough technology that responds to signals from the brain has transformed the life of a paralyzed 28-year-old man called Thibault. Four years after the initial incident that paralysed him, Thibault is walking again. Thanks to a combination of revolutionary technology and immense brain power, he is able to operate a full-body exoskeleton.

“When you are in my position, when you can’t do anything with your body […] I wanted to do something with my brain,” Thibault said.

This is where the process began. He first trained his brain by using a video game avatar to help him develop the skills needed to operate an exoskeleton - this involved a long process of completely relearning and visualizing natural movements.

Thibault’s brain signals were then recorded by two devices, implanted either side of his head, between the brain and the skin. These read his sensorimotor cortex, the part of the brain that controls motor function.

Professor Alim Louis Benabid, leader of the trial at Grenoble Alps Hospital explains, “The brain is still capable of generating commands that would normally move the arms and legs, there’s just nothing to carry them out.'' This is where technology was able to provide the final piece of the puzzle. Moving from avatar to exoskeleton, over many training sessions Thibault has covered the distance of one and a half football pitches.

Experts involved in the study say their research may lead to the production of brain-controlled wheelchairs - a possibility revolutionary for those with restricted mobility. Thibault says the trial offers “a message of hope to people like me.”

This huge achievement disrupts morbid predictions of man being controlled by technology. Instead, therapeutic uses of this kind give us a positive model for creating technologies that facilitate human agency and determination in life-enriching ways.

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