150 results for “Boomeranged Metaphors”

Is eSports really sport?

Jack Caulfield
March 22nd 2018
eSports is the huge industry that’s growing up around competitive online gaming. Let’s take a look at how this cyberpunk sporting world came to be.

Skyscraper Fails to Load Its Textures

Jack Caulfield
December 21st 2017
In New York, observant residents were surprised to see a skyscraper that looked like it was struggling to load its textures.

Online Ads in Offline Locations

Ruben Baart
November 15th 2017

Ever stood in front of a mountain and wondered which other mountains you might like after seeing this one? No? Well, it's what we do everyday. London-based artist duo Scott Kelly and Ben Polkinghorne are exploring decision-making processes in the age of Amazon to algorithmically recommend landscapes.…

Ad Blockers Go Real Life

Van Mensvoort
November 3rd 2017
The Brand Killer augmented reality headset boomerangs ad blocking into the physical realm.

The Human Smart Home Assistant

Charlotte Kuijpers
September 29th 2017
Artist Lauren McCarthy launched a project called LAUREN in which she embodies a eponymous human smart home assistant.

DNA Hacking: Catch a Computer Virus

Jack Caulfield
September 21st 2017
We know how it feels to catch a cold; how might it feel to catch malware?

Meet the Emoji Snake

Julie Reindl
April 4th 2017
Python breeder designed emoji snake.

Anime Characters at Your Service

Alejandro Alvarez
January 2nd 2017
Take a look at this video to get an idea of what life with a virtual anime assistant would look like.

Fiction to Reality: Invented Traditions

Alejandro Alvarez
September 30th 2016
It’s true that mexicans celebrate Day of the Dead dressing as skeletons and setting shrines to death, but the carnivalesque parade with giant puppets was a surprise to every local who watched the movie.

Flip-Flop Selfie

Mathilde Nakken
September 26th 2016
These two boys use the nap of their flip-flop as a camera to take an imaginary selfie. Still, their selfie went viral and it became our peculiar image of the week.
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Games as sports

In the early days of video games, showing off your skills and competing with other players was a matter of going to the arcade and challenging someone in person.At first, it was about gaining the highest scores. The golden age of the arcade in the late 70s and early 80s saw the release of classics like Space InvadersPac-Man, and Donkey Kong. Players would pour hundreds of coins into arcade machines, battling for high scores with their friends - and with anyone else who happened to be in the arcade arena. There was even an urban legend about a coin shortage caused by arcades in Japan, and talk of "Pac-Mania" in the US. This was the beginning of games as a vibrant social and competitive activity.After a decline in popularity in the mid-to-late 80s, arcades had a renaissance in the early 90s, this time catalyzed by the appearance of fighting games such as Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat. In contrast to the most popular games of the golden age, these games put players head-to-head in direct combat.Rather than playing against the game, the competition was now directly between two individual players. In sporting terms, it's rather like the difference between a time trial and a head-to-head race. Suddenly, there's more to reckon with than the game itself; you have to handle the tactics, tells and quirks of your opponent.But arcades, replaced with increasingly advanced home consoles, largely lost their appeal, and it would be a while before competitive gaming came to the fore again.

The rise of eSports

While home gaming often allowed for split-screen play, the next step in games evolution as a sport of their own comes with the increasing popularity of online multiplayer.Real-time strategy (RTS) and first-person shooter (FPS) games, as well as fighting games like Street Fighter, all moved towards online play during the 90s and 2000s. This new way to play allowed players to connect not just with others in their local area, like the arcade, but with talented gamers across the world.It didn't take too long for fiercely competitive scenes to develop around games like Counter-Strike and Starcraft, and eventually casual competition was no longer enough for some pros. After years of honing their skills against amateurs, the best of the best could finally go professional.eSports tournaments really took off during the past decade, with the appearance of multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) games, like League of Legends and Dota. Events like The International, hosted by Seattle's KeyArena, draw huge crowds and pit pro gamers against each other in person. Digital spectator sports have come full circle: from watching two players go head-to-head at the local arcade, to anonymous competition online, back to the status of in-person competition - but this time with a crowd of millions.

Digital athleticism

Meanwhile, other variants of digital athleticism have developed over the years. Speedrun events like Games Done Quick, which challenge players to get through games as quickly as possible, regularly draw in thousands of viewers and raise huge amounts of money for charity every year. The fighting games community continues to host its own tournaments, where players bring their own "fight sticks", controllers meant to replicate the feel of classic arcade controls.Collectible card games (CCGs) like Hearthstone and Magic: The Gathering have their own popular tournaments. And battle-royale games like Battlegrounds, where 100 players compete in a Hunger Games-like survival contest, promise to be the next big thing for sports in the virtual world.In the increasingly digital world we live in, it's becoming clear that the definition of sport is expanding daily. From exclusively athletic competitions, we're broadening the concept to include digital phenomena we could only have imagined a few decades ago. For fans of the excitement, spectacle and community spirit built by sport, it can only be a good thing. 

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[post_title] => Is eSports really sport? [post_excerpt] => eSports is the huge industry that’s growing up around competitive online gaming. Let’s take a look at how this cyberpunk sporting world came to be. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => esports [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-22 15:20:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-22 14:20:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79278/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79142 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2017-12-21 18:00:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-21 17:00:55 [post_content] => Our peculiar image of the week comes from New York, where observant residents were surprised to see a skyscraper that looked like it was struggling to load its textures. The Twitter user who snapped the uncanny picture eventually figured out that the odd low-resolution effect was created by reflections from a neighboring building. But it's telling about the world we live in that an illusion like this can so quickly cause us to confuse reality with digital rendering. Via Twitter. [post_title] => Skyscraper Fails to Load Its Textures [post_excerpt] => In New York, observant residents were surprised to see a skyscraper that looked like it was struggling to load its textures. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => skyscraper-texture [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-02 16:31:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-02 15:31:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79142/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78230 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-11-15 10:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-15 08:00:22 [post_content] => Ever stood in front of a mountain and wondered which other mountains you might like after seeing this one? No? Well, it's what we do everyday. London-based artist duo Scott Kelly and Ben Polkinghorne are exploring decision-making processes in the age of Amazon to algorithmically recommend landscapes.We are not talking rainforests here. Having installed a series of invasive billboards on popular tourist locations in New Zealand, the artists are not suggesting what tourists should go see next, but rather make us wonder what's the influence of online recommendations on our real-world decisions.Story via Scott and Ben. All images by artists. [post_title] => Online Ads in Offline Locations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => online-ads [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-14 14:48:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-14 12:48:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78230/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77653 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2017-11-03 10:00:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-03 08:00:42 [post_content] => Hate being bombarded with advertising? Many people already use an ad blocker in their browser or smartphone to avoid commercial messages. The Brand Killer boomerangs ad blocking into the physical realm.The augmented reality headset, made by a team of students from the University of Pennsylvania, automatically recognizes brand logos and blurs them in the perception of the viewer - whether it's on a Starbucks cup, a sneaker or a billboard.The prototype headset is still clunky and won't be very practical in everyday live. Nevertheless, it makes us aware that not only our digital virtual environment, but also our physical environment is highly mediated with all kinds of branded messages.Thanks Selby  [post_title] => Ad Blockers Go Real Life [post_excerpt] => The Brand Killer augmented reality headset boomerangs ad blocking into the physical realm. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => brand-killer-ad-blockers-real-life [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-24 11:28:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-24 09:28:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77653/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77553 [post_author] => 1433 [post_date] => 2017-09-29 10:00:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-29 08:00:44 [post_content] => Amazon Alexa, Siri, Google Home or Cortana. Smart assistants are everywhere. They are useful, convenient, like a butler who never leaves the room. But wait, is it? Imagine a person sitting on your kitchen counter, waiting for orders. Of course, the fact that you can ask everything, hands-free, is very helpful. But that person stays there also when you don’t have any tasks for him or he and can listen to everything you talk about in your home. Would you like to have that person in your house? Would we question the concept of smart home devices if Alexa was a real person? That’s the question Los Angeles-based artist Lauren McCarthy asks with her project LAUREN.As her website explains: "LAUREN is a human intelligent smart home. Lauren will visit your home, deploy a series of smart devices, and watch over you remotely 24/7. Lauren will control your home for you, attempting to be better than an AI, understanding you as a person. You will be able to interact with her by calling her name, but she will also do things for you without your asking. She will learn faster than an algorithm, adapting to your desires and anticipating your needs".The project is a performance piece during which the artist embodies the eponymous smart home assistant. LAUREN is part different situations one wouldn't normally share with a stranger. She listened to hour-long conversation between close friends, she was even part of a date. That date was particularly stressful for LAUREN, as she was in charge of setting the mood with the right lighting and music.Smart home devices are always listening, waiting for that “Okay Google” to start a task. This can be amazingly favorable and even life-saving, in some cases. However, most users do not consider their helpful assistants intruding, or a possible threat to their privacy.With LAUREN, McCarthy aims to make privacy regarding data and AI much more tangible. Her project lets us question the amount of (intimate) data we actually share with smart devices in our home.Source: Co. Design [post_title] => The Human Smart Home Assistant [post_excerpt] => Artist Lauren McCarthy launched a project called LAUREN in which she embodies a eponymous human smart home assistant. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => human-smart-home-assistant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-27 11:53:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-27 09:53:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77553/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77134 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2017-09-21 09:57:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-21 07:57:36 [post_content] => We’re familiar with the term virus referring to both biological infections and to similar infections meant to affect computers. But researchers at the University of Washington have discovered a new and surprising conflation of these two ideas: the possibility of encoding a computer virus into a strand of human DNA. We know how it feels to catch a cold, but how does it feel to catch a malware?

DNA hacking?

A conceptually similar study in the past has involved implanting a human with a microchip containing the virus, but this new research, led by computer science professor Tadayashi Kohno, instead involved encoding patterns into DNA samples. When run through a DNA sequencer, these patterns were designed to create a 'buffer overflow' and gain control of the computer system.The scientists discovered, however, that the process raised unexpected complications when attempted through the medium of DNA. DNA sequencers mix different chemicals with the basic units of DNA: A, T, G, and C. The chemicals interact differently with each of these four bases, and produce different colours of light which allow the sequencer to identify the DNA’s pattern. The research was very complicated, but its goal was essentially to encode a virus into these A, T, G and C units.

Bilingual DNA

The issues Kohno’s team ran into were related to this process of translation. The DNA, as well as fulfilling its function as a computer virus, also had to function as a stable DNA sequence. The researchers quickly found that the sequences required to create the buffer overflow were not necessarily conducive to the development of stable DNA. In other words, the DNA had to speak two languages at once.The virus required the same strings of code to repeat over and over, which could cause the DNA to fold in on itself. Stable DNA also requires a certain proportion of As and Ts to Gs and Cs - again, not necessarily the same proportion required for the virus to function. Finally, while DNA sequencing can easily be done back-to-front, computer code can only execute when read in the right order. The research report suggests an amusing solution to this problem: writing the DNA sequence as a palindrome, so that it would read the same forwards or backwards.

When digital and biological collide

The team was eventually able to achieve some results - at least in attacking the modified version of the DNA sequencer program that was used in the tests. The research suggests that such biological hacking techniques are highly impractical and unthreatening for now. But Seth Shipman, Harvard researcher whose own work involved storing a GIF inside bacteria, commented that "down the line, when more information is stored in DNA and it’s being input and sequenced constantly, we'll be glad we started thinking about these things".What will a future in which biomedicine and computer science collide look like? And will we infect our computers by coughing at them? We are used to protect ourselves against infections from tainted foods, animals and other people. And in the digital realm, we are used to downloading antivirus software to protect our computers from similar infections. But in our next nature, which is wild and unpredictable as ever, we might have to get used to protecting ourselves against computer viruses, and protect our computers against influenza; and no handkerchief can top that!Source: Wired [post_title] => DNA Hacking: Catch a Computer Virus [post_excerpt] => We know how it feels to catch a cold; how might it feel to catch malware? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => catch-computer-virus [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-27 10:15:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-27 08:15:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77134/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72533 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-04-04 11:41:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-04 10:41:23 [post_content] => From pets, landscapes and even ourselves, we love to remake the world to our "needs". Our best friends are just as carefully designed as the latest piece of technology, think about the genetically modified glowing fish or the tattooed pigs. This time it is the emoji snake, designed to make you smile (wondering if the reptile is cheerful too). A python breeder really managed to create the so-called “Emoji Ball Python” after eight years of trying. This earned him a spot on our peculiar image of the week series.Source: Iflscience. Image: Inverse [post_title] => Meet the Emoji Snake [post_excerpt] => Python breeder designed emoji snake. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => meet-emoji-snake [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-04 13:54:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-04 12:54:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72533/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69638 [post_author] => 874 [post_date] => 2017-01-02 16:00:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-02 15:00:48 [post_content] => Being friends with a cartoon character is a common childhood dream that is mostly forgotten in adulthood. Not in Japan! The Land of the Rising Sun always surprises the occidental world. Gatebox is bringing cartoons to reality in a way that seems to wink at the movie Her by Spike Jonze or to this Black Mirror episode. Just take a look at their video to get an idea of what life with a virtual anime assistant would look like.Azuma Ikaro promises to bring to your house and daily life all the features of Alexa and Google Home packed in the best kawaii from Japan. Equipped with sensors, microphones and connected to your house and the Internet, it pledges to be there whenever you need her. For now only Azuma Ikaro is available, but the universe will expand soon and you will be able to edit or create a virtual companion of your own.The only question left is if she or he will eventually get bored of our everyday life and go find a better virtual companion. Sayonara!Source: Gatebox [post_title] => Anime Characters at Your Service [post_excerpt] => Take a look at this video to get an idea of what life with a virtual anime assistant would look like. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => anime-characters-service [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-30 18:44:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-30 17:44:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69638 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 67026 [post_author] => 874 [post_date] => 2016-09-30 16:00:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-30 14:00:29 [post_content] => In Spectre, the last James Bond movie, we could see the Day of the Dead parade in Mexico city, a centenary tradition held every November in the capital of the country that celebrates death. Just a little note, the parade is as fictitious as agent 007.It’s true that mexicans celebrate Day of the Dead dressing as skeletons and setting shrines to death, but the carnivalesque parade with giant puppets was a surprise to every local who watched the movie. Not anymore, if everything goes as planned, this year Mexico city will have its first parade to honor the dead, because as the minister of tourism put it: “We have to invent a Day of the Dead carnival because, after watching the James Bond movie the tourists will come looking for the parade and they won’t find it". This is a clear case of fiction becoming culture, an invented tradition leaving the screen to become reality. As Eric Hobsbawm explains in his essay The Invention of Tradition: "Traditions wich appear or claim to be old are often quite recent in origin and sometimes invented". This phenomenon is not new, it has been widely researched by Hobsbawm and has been used in the past to create social cohesion, socialization and to inculcate beliefs. In this case the tradition that inspired the producers became fiction and then a reality that will satisfy the visitors next November.Source: La Jornada. Image: Eon Productions [post_title] => Fiction to Reality: Invented Traditions [post_excerpt] => It’s true that mexicans celebrate Day of the Dead dressing as skeletons and setting shrines to death, but the carnivalesque parade with giant puppets was a surprise to every local who watched the movie. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fiction-reality-invented-traditions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-20 11:51:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-20 09:51:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65880 [menu_order] => 37 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 67030 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2016-09-26 11:02:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-26 09:02:37 [post_content] => Taking a selfie is not as obvious as it might seem. About five billion people, of the 7.4 living on our planet, don't own a smartphone. These two boys use the nap of their flip-flop as a camera to take an imaginary selfie. Still, their selfie went viral and became our peculiar image of the week.Image via Volkskrant [post_title] => Flip-Flop Selfie [post_excerpt] => These two boys use the nap of their flip-flop as a camera to take an imaginary selfie. Still, their selfie went viral and it became our peculiar image of the week. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => peculiar-image-week-flip-flop-selfie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-21 11:40:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-21 09:40:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=66064 [menu_order] => 31 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79278 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2018-03-22 10:00:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-22 09:00:36 [post_content] => First things first. Sport is a next nature: Whereas our ancient ancestors had to hunt for their food, our modern tribes simply visit the supermarket. With all this free time left on our hands, we invented a new pastime: sports. Yet, a current trend to simulate sports is to participate in eSports, a large industry that’s currently growing up around competitive online gaming. Let's look at how eSports is taking the 'sports' world by storm.

Games as sports

In the early days of video games, showing off your skills and competing with other players was a matter of going to the arcade and challenging someone in person.At first, it was about gaining the highest scores. The golden age of the arcade in the late 70s and early 80s saw the release of classics like Space InvadersPac-Man, and Donkey Kong. Players would pour hundreds of coins into arcade machines, battling for high scores with their friends - and with anyone else who happened to be in the arcade arena. There was even an urban legend about a coin shortage caused by arcades in Japan, and talk of "Pac-Mania" in the US. This was the beginning of games as a vibrant social and competitive activity.After a decline in popularity in the mid-to-late 80s, arcades had a renaissance in the early 90s, this time catalyzed by the appearance of fighting games such as Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat. In contrast to the most popular games of the golden age, these games put players head-to-head in direct combat.Rather than playing against the game, the competition was now directly between two individual players. In sporting terms, it's rather like the difference between a time trial and a head-to-head race. Suddenly, there's more to reckon with than the game itself; you have to handle the tactics, tells and quirks of your opponent.But arcades, replaced with increasingly advanced home consoles, largely lost their appeal, and it would be a while before competitive gaming came to the fore again.

The rise of eSports

While home gaming often allowed for split-screen play, the next step in games evolution as a sport of their own comes with the increasing popularity of online multiplayer.Real-time strategy (RTS) and first-person shooter (FPS) games, as well as fighting games like Street Fighter, all moved towards online play during the 90s and 2000s. This new way to play allowed players to connect not just with others in their local area, like the arcade, but with talented gamers across the world.It didn't take too long for fiercely competitive scenes to develop around games like Counter-Strike and Starcraft, and eventually casual competition was no longer enough for some pros. After years of honing their skills against amateurs, the best of the best could finally go professional.eSports tournaments really took off during the past decade, with the appearance of multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) games, like League of Legends and Dota. Events like The International, hosted by Seattle's KeyArena, draw huge crowds and pit pro gamers against each other in person. Digital spectator sports have come full circle: from watching two players go head-to-head at the local arcade, to anonymous competition online, back to the status of in-person competition - but this time with a crowd of millions.

Digital athleticism

Meanwhile, other variants of digital athleticism have developed over the years. Speedrun events like Games Done Quick, which challenge players to get through games as quickly as possible, regularly draw in thousands of viewers and raise huge amounts of money for charity every year. The fighting games community continues to host its own tournaments, where players bring their own "fight sticks", controllers meant to replicate the feel of classic arcade controls.Collectible card games (CCGs) like Hearthstone and Magic: The Gathering have their own popular tournaments. And battle-royale games like Battlegrounds, where 100 players compete in a Hunger Games-like survival contest, promise to be the next big thing for sports in the virtual world.In the increasingly digital world we live in, it's becoming clear that the definition of sport is expanding daily. From exclusively athletic competitions, we're broadening the concept to include digital phenomena we could only have imagined a few decades ago. For fans of the excitement, spectacle and community spirit built by sport, it can only be a good thing. 

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