8 results for “Co-Evolution”

AI Defeats Human at Go

Ruben Baart
May 30th 2017
Go world champion Ke Jie has lost two games of 'Go' against Google's DeepMind AI system AlphaGo.

Razorius Gilletus Flexball Subspecies

Van Mensvoort
May 20th 2014
The latest subspecies in the Razorius line is the Razorius Gilletus Flexball. While Gillete proclaims they reinvented shaving, others argue Gillette's new razor is everything that's wrong with America.

Razorius Gilletus Gold Plastic

Van Mensvoort
March 3rd 2014
Like the exorbitant feathers of the peacock, which only function is to aesthetically stand out amid its competitors, this new species of Razorius Gilletus only differs from its predecessor aesthetically.

Meet The Tongue Parasite

Van Mensvoort
September 11th 2013
If you're a fish, and want to keep your original tongue, better keep your mouth closed.

Co-Evolving with Technology

Van Mensvoort
April 12th 2013
Looking at this nextnatural comic, our co-evolutionary relationship with technology might need some work.

Mothership

Van Mensvoort
March 8th 2013
A ship shipping ship, shipping shipping ships.

Evolution of the Chicken

Van Mensvoort
August 4th 2011

From Dinosaur to primitive bird to supermarket discount. Although chickens thrive as a species – in the sense that billions of them roam the earth bio-industry – we doubt if the decision of the chicken-species to involve itself in a co-evolutionary relation with people, was a wise one. Lesson learned: always be very concise on what or who you get into a co-evolutionary relationship with. Chickens have limited abilities in this regard, but people should do better.

Via NRC charity …

System Animals

Van Mensvoort
April 10th 2011

What animal is so naive to come into this world as a naked and crying infant, completely vulnerable, helpless, and an easy prey for any predator? Newborn lamb or giraffe’s babies can walk within a few hours, but it takes humans years and years to learn to take care of themselves. Yet, despite our physical vulnerability, we’ve proven not only able to survive, but even to dominate the planet. How come?

Unlike other animals, which have specific organs, skills and …

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Pollinators and flowers have coevolved to work together, while prey species have co-evolved with their predators to avoid being eaten. Humans may be coevolving with their technology. [parent] => 0 [count] => 8 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 216 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (220) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75209 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-05-30 11:49:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-30 09:49:09 [post_content] => Humans and computers have a long history of competing when it comes to playing board games. From Wolfgang Von Kempelen’s ‘Turk’ (a mechanical chess-playing machine which eventually turned out to be operated by a small human) to the infamous match between IBM’s supercomputer Deep Blue versus human chess genius Garry Kasparov. Another victory can be added to computer wins, as Go world champion Ke Jie has just lost two games of 'Go' against Google's DeepMind AI system AlphaGo.Go is a 2.500-year-old game that is exponentially more complex than a ‘simple’ game of chess. Rooted in ancient China, the abstract-looking game is believed to be the oldest board game around the block, and is still played today. It consists of two players, one Black and one White, who put their “stones” on the intersections of the board’s lines, with the aim of acquiring more territory than their opponent.DeepMind CEO and co-founder Demis Hassabis explains: "As simple as the rules are, Go is a game of profound complexity. There are 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible positions - that’s more than the number of atoms in the universe, and more than a googol times larger than chess".To “train” AlphaGo played numerous games against itself, did its homework by studying about 100.000 human matches and played many of the world's top players under the pseudonym 'Master' in online matches earlier this year. As it went, it reprogrammed and improved itself, gradually influencing human players to start adapting their gameplay to seemingly unconventional systemized strategies. In a way the story of AlphaGo is yet another analogy to understand our co-evolutionary path with technology; a path to domesticate our habits, our next nature, which eventually will also come to domesticate us.Source: BBC [post_title] => AI Defeats Human at Go [post_excerpt] => Go world champion Ke Jie has lost two games of 'Go' against Google's DeepMind AI system AlphaGo. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ai-defeats-human-at-go [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-01 12:31:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-01 10:31:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=75209/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 39399 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2014-05-20 16:00:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-05-20 14:00:31 [post_content] => Regular readers of this blog know we closely monitor razor technology as a symbol of our co-evolutionary relationship with technology. This basically means that, like the bees and the flowers, people and technology are intertwined in mutual dependence: we serve our technology as much as it serves us. And just like humans, technology wants to prosper, propagate and grow. The blindness 'innovation' of shaving razors, with more and more blades, strips and grips, exemplifies this development.The latest subspecies in the Razorius line is the Razorius Gilletus Flexball. While the Gillete Corporation proclaims they have reinvented shaving, others argue Gillette's new razor is everything that's wrong with America.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6WvdJn9e60[/youtube] Yes, you should make up your own mind, dear intelligent reader. Although we are keen to remind you that already in 1975, shortly after the Gillette Trac II razor – the first two-bladed men's razor – was released, its excessive design was parodied on the US Television show Saturday Night Live.The creators of the satirical television program played on the notion of a two bladed razor as a sign of the emerging consumption culture. They made a fake commercial parody for a fictitious razor with the ridiculous amount of three (!) blades, emphasizing the consumer is gullible enough to believe and buy everything seen on TV.Of course, the comedians of Saturday Night Live could not know a three-bladed razors would become a reality on the consumer market in the late 1990?s. Let alone that they could have anticipated we would shave ourselves with a five bladed battery powered led enabled flexible razors in 2014.Welcome in the twenty-first century folks: no, we don’t travel in spaceships… but we do have five bladed razors!Movement_highres_530 [post_title] => Razorius Gilletus Flexball Subspecies [post_excerpt] => The latest subspecies in the Razorius line is the Razorius Gilletus Flexball. While Gillete proclaims they reinvented shaving, others argue Gillette's new razor is everything that's wrong with America. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => razorius-gilletus-flexball-subspecies [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-05-20 10:03:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-05-20 08:03:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=39399 [menu_order] => 1012 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38450 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2014-03-03 16:00:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-03 15:00:03 [post_content] => Regular readers of this blog know we are closely monitoring razor technology as a symbol of our co-evolutionary relationship with technology. This basically means that, like the bees and the flowers, people and technology are caught in a relationship of mutual dependence: we serve our technology as much as it serves us. And just like humans, technology wants to prosper, propagate and grow.The latest species in the Razorius line is the Razorius Gilletus Gold Plastic. Like the exorbitant feathers of the peacock, which only function is to aesthetically stand out amid its competitors, this new species of Razorius Gilletus only differs from its predecessor with a thin layer of gold paint on its plastic body.Whereas earlier models distinguished themselves with added blades or aloe strips, this recent model only differs aesthetically from earlier species. Anyhow, this might just be as effective in standing out amidst the other species in the shelves, as functional differences.We are eagerly awaiting what the next phase of evolution for the Razorius Gilletus species will be. More blades? Platinum? Nanoshave? WiFi connected? If you have any ideas, visions or expectations you want to share, please use the good old fashioned comment box below. [post_title] => Razorius Gilletus Gold Plastic [post_excerpt] => Like the exorbitant feathers of the peacock, which only function is to aesthetically stand out amid its competitors, this new species of Razorius Gilletus only differs from its predecessor aesthetically. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => razorius-gilletus-gold-plastic [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-03-03 00:08:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-03-02 23:08:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38450 [menu_order] => 1085 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 3 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 36136 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2013-09-11 11:00:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-09-11 09:00:10 [post_content] => In our culture, nature is generally depicted as a beautiful spectacle that is romanticized as a positive force. Time to shed some light on its darker sides. Meet Cymothoa exigua, aka the tongue parasite. You'll never be alone again once it crawls into your mouth (if you're a fish). This parasitic crustacean will eat and replace your tongue:When one of these crustaceans encounters a rose snapper, it enters the fish's mouth and steadily devours the fish's tongue. Once it has done this, the crustacean uses hooks on its underside to attach itself to the floor of the fish's mouth and thereafter serves as a replacement tongue. Cymothoa exigua is strictly speaking off-topic as it is an old nature rather than a next nature phenomenon. Nonetheless it is a good example of the extreme crudeness of old nature, which we hardly ever encounter among the biomimic marketed products in the supermarket.Readers question: Does a next nature equivalent of Cymothoa exigua exist and if so, what would it be? [post_title] => Meet The Tongue Parasite [post_excerpt] => If you're a fish, and want to keep your original tongue, better keep your mouth closed. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => meet-the-tongue-parasite [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-09-10 10:30:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-09-10 08:30:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=36136 [menu_order] => 1277 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 32519 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2013-04-12 11:00:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-04-12 09:00:17 [post_content] => Like bees and the flowers, we are entangled in a co-evolutionary relationship with our technology. But as in any relationship, we should make sure both parties are actually benefiting from the affair.Looking at this next natural comic, it seems like our relationship might need some work. Thanks Ad. [post_title] => Co-Evolving with Technology [post_excerpt] => Looking at this nextnatural comic, our co-evolutionary relationship with technology might need some work. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => co-evolving-with-technology [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-04-10 16:52:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-04-10 14:52:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=32519 [menu_order] => 1480 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 31647 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2013-03-08 11:00:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-03-08 10:00:43 [post_content] => A ship shipping ships. Like the bees, who help the flowers propagate, have people become the sex organs of technology? Peculiar image of the week.[post_title] => Mothership [post_excerpt] => A ship shipping ship, shipping shipping ships. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mothership [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-03-08 13:36:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-03-08 12:36:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=31647 [menu_order] => 1519 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16273 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2011-08-04 10:29:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-08-04 08:29:32 [post_content] => From Dinosaur to primitive bird to supermarket discount. Although chickens thrive as a species – in the sense that billions of them roam the earth bio-industry – we doubt if the decision of the chicken-species to involve itself in a co-evolutionary relation with people, was a wise one. Lesson learned: always be very concise on what or who you get into a co-evolutionary relationship with. Chickens have limited abilities in this regard, but people should do better.Via NRC charity Awards. Thanks René Pare. [post_title] => Evolution of the Chicken [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => evolution-of-the-chicken [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-08-20 10:21:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-20 08:21:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=16273 [menu_order] => 2176 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 4 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13914 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2011-04-10 14:06:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-10 12:06:48 [post_content] => What animal is so naive to come into this world as a naked and crying infant, completely vulnerable, helpless, and an easy prey for any predator? Newborn lamb or giraffe’s babies can walk within a few hours, but it takes humans years and years to learn to take care of themselves. Yet, despite our physical vulnerability, we’ve proven not only able to survive, but even to dominate the planet. How come?Unlike other animals, which have specific organs, skills and reflexes that enable them to survive in their proper environment, humans have never been placed in an environment for which we are specifically equipped. The human physique implies that there is no such thing as a ‘purely’ natural environment for us. We are system animals: technological beings by nature.[pullquote]We are system animals: technological beings by nature[/pullquote]Compared to other animals, humans are maladjusted, primitive and undeveloped. Yet, we compensate by being the most enthusiastic system builders of the entire animal kingdom. Although this trait is typically seen as advancement from our primate ancestors – indeed an astronaut has some powers a monkey must live without – we rarely realize that our system craving not only empowers us, but at times also imprison us.From the dawn of humankind we have constituted system. It is safe to say, we have co-evolved with them, like the bees have co-evolved with flowers. And as in any symbiotic relation, traffic goes two ways. With every technological ‘upgrade’ we relinquish a piece of our selves. A pelt for a coat, hunting for farming, singing for writing, memory for web search.Through our systems we domesticate our environment, yet every new system also causes a new situation, a next nature, which eventually also domesticates us. We serve our systems as much as they serve us.Image: Bjork video, All is Full of Love, director Chris Cunningham. [post_title] => System Animals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => system-animals [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-11 12:50:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-11 11:50:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=13914 [menu_order] => 2273 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 8 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75209 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-05-30 11:49:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-30 09:49:09 [post_content] => Humans and computers have a long history of competing when it comes to playing board games. From Wolfgang Von Kempelen’s ‘Turk’ (a mechanical chess-playing machine which eventually turned out to be operated by a small human) to the infamous match between IBM’s supercomputer Deep Blue versus human chess genius Garry Kasparov. Another victory can be added to computer wins, as Go world champion Ke Jie has just lost two games of 'Go' against Google's DeepMind AI system AlphaGo.Go is a 2.500-year-old game that is exponentially more complex than a ‘simple’ game of chess. Rooted in ancient China, the abstract-looking game is believed to be the oldest board game around the block, and is still played today. It consists of two players, one Black and one White, who put their “stones” on the intersections of the board’s lines, with the aim of acquiring more territory than their opponent.DeepMind CEO and co-founder Demis Hassabis explains: "As simple as the rules are, Go is a game of profound complexity. There are 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible positions - that’s more than the number of atoms in the universe, and more than a googol times larger than chess".To “train” AlphaGo played numerous games against itself, did its homework by studying about 100.000 human matches and played many of the world's top players under the pseudonym 'Master' in online matches earlier this year. As it went, it reprogrammed and improved itself, gradually influencing human players to start adapting their gameplay to seemingly unconventional systemized strategies. In a way the story of AlphaGo is yet another analogy to understand our co-evolutionary path with technology; a path to domesticate our habits, our next nature, which eventually will also come to domesticate us.Source: BBC [post_title] => AI Defeats Human at Go [post_excerpt] => Go world champion Ke Jie has lost two games of 'Go' against Google's DeepMind AI system AlphaGo. 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