163 results for “Design-for-debate”

Genetically engineered plants do it better

NextNature.net
January 11th 2019

Welcome to the conversation! Every week, we’ll open up a new conversation among members of the network about next nature topics we've encountered around the globe. We hope Nextnature.net can serve as a thrilling platform for dialogue among our authors, members, and anyone interested in exploring the next nature with us. On behalf of the editorial team, welcome. – Koert van Mensvoort

What happened Genetic engineers in Illinois have designed super-size tobacco plants that grow as much as 40% larger …

What an artificial womb may look like in the future

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
November 1st 2018

Consider this: in the future, artificial wombs could replace incubators as they mimic the natural environment of the female uterus. But what will these devices look like? And how should we respond to such technology if or when it comes knocking at our cultural doors? Now, we are delighted to present our speculative design proposal for an artificial womb in close collaboration with Máxima Medical Centre. Because if not us, then who? …

Your Next Nature guide to Dutch Design Week 2018

Meike Schipper
October 15th 2018

Over time, our bodies, our food and our environment have become more and more subject to design. As designers, we hold the responsibility and have the unique chance to envision the world - in order to decide which future we want. Because if not us, then who?…

Reimagining popular apps with the Pyramid of Technology

Alejandro Alvarez
October 3rd 2018

Today, there's an app for everything. They help us satisfy our cravings, allow us to communicate at all times and make it easier to share special moments. But the dark, cold screens of our smart phones, the de facto platform for these tools, simply don’t resonate with the sensorial aspects of our human needs.…

Take Your Data Selfie

Michelle Guenne
February 24th 2017
Do digital footprints match real life goals?

The Global Subway Map of the Future

Ruben Baart
January 23rd 2017
The Hyperloop will turn the world into a global village.

Rethinking 3D Printing for the Future

Nadine Roestenburg
December 27th 2016
Additivism is a movement that calls for radical rethinking of new technologies, such as 3D printing, the plastification of the world and our human position within it.

Photoshop Hacks Become In Real Life Art

Nadine Roestenburg
December 1st 2016
UV Production House reflects on popular online platforms for maker culture.

Painted by Drones

Ruben Baart
October 10th 2016
German aerial-photography group Cooper Copter is exploring “vandalism 2.0” with drones that throw paint bombs.

Will We Share .thought Files?

Mathilde Nakken
October 10th 2016
With the evolving technique called EEG, electroencephalography, we can measure brain activity and ultimately even read the brain.
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Welcome to the conversation! Every week, we’ll open up a new conversation among members of the network about next nature topics we've encountered around the globe. We hope Nextnature.net can serve as a thrilling platform for dialogue among our authors, members, and anyone interested in exploring the next nature with us. On behalf of the editorial team, welcome. – Koert van Mensvoort

What happened Genetic engineers in Illinois have designed super-size tobacco plants that grow as much as 40% larger than usual by tweaking the process that plants use to turn sunlight into food.
Why tobacco? Researchers work with tobacco because it grows quickly and is easy to genetically modify. The team is now making similar gene changes to potatoes, soybeans, and cowpeas.
Greener than you think In the US alone, average crop yields are only 20% of those produced during bumper crop seasons when conditions are ‘ideal’. In other words, during a typical growing season 80% of our food production is lost to pathogens and environmental stress. Genetically engineered plants have already solved some of these problems in an environmentally friendly way.
The bad news While the research is being conducted in the US, the EU has established a rather protectionist legal framework that puts the development of modern biotechnology, and more specifically of GMOs, on hold.
Societal debate A recent survey shows that fear of GMOs is increasing. Researchers believe it could take 20 years to get the new crops approved by regulators. However, reclaiming even a percentage of crop loss across the world would go a long way to meeting the 21st century’s rapidly expanding food demands, so it's certainly worth having a discussion about. Feel free to share your knowledge, thoughts and viewpoints with us in the Contribute section! ?

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Consider this: in the future, artificial wombs could replace incubators as they mimic the natural environment of the female uterus. But what will these devices look like? And how should we respond to such technology if or when it comes knocking at our cultural doors? Now, we are delighted to present our speculative design proposal for an artificial womb in close collaboration with Máxima Medical Centre. Because if not us, then who?

To give you some background, Máxima Medical Centre is taking steps into the development of the first artificial womb, in order to increase the chances of survival of extremely premature babies in the period of 24-28 weeks.

At this moment, these chances are low: 61% dies with 24 weeks and 43% with 25 weeks. The babies that survive, often suffer from chronical damage such as brain damage, chronical breathing problems, retina problems and possibility of blindness.

“Every week we can prolong the growth of a 24-week old foetus in a artificial womb, we increase the chances of survival with 18%”, says Guid Oei, gynecologist of MMC. “If we can extend this to 28 weeks we the biggest danger of premature death is probably gone”.

Hendrik-Jan Grievink, designer NNN and Dr. Oei, gynecologist MMC.

The unique collaboration between Máxima Medical Centre and Next Nature Network is part of an ongoing research into the impact of technology on the future of biological reproduction, intimacy and relationships under the working title REPRODUTOPIA.

Because how will we make babies, experience intimacy and build families in the future?

Next Nature Network reframes this question in terms of design: is it possible and preferable that this area is something that can be designed? And if so, what strategies can we follow?

The research will lead into a series of publications, exhibitions and events over the course of the coming years.

Design for debate: the artificial womb prototype as presented at the Dutch Design Week

The artificial womb installation was presented at the Chronic Health exhibition during the Dutch Design Week (October 20-28 Eindhoven, The Netherlands) and will travel afterwards.

If you are interested in booking the installation for your event, please contact us.

Photography: Bram Saeys

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Over time, our bodies, our food and our environment have become more and more subject to design. As designers, we hold the responsibility and have the unique chance to envision the world - in order to decide which future we want. Because if not us, then who?

This weekend, the Dutch Design Week 2018 opens in Eindhoven. In more than a hundred locations across the city, it presents the work and ideas of more than 2600 designers to more than 335,000 visitors from home and abroad. The Next Nature guide to DDW18 captures how technology is helping shape our world into a better, healthier and maybe even more next natural place. Here are 5 projects that you should not miss:

Chronic Health

As we increasingly seek to be healthier and happier, the boundaries between cure and enhancement are fading. We reach out to technological inventions and their possibilities to stretch the boundaries of human life. The exhibition Chronic Health: If not us, then who? by the Embassy of Health explores the future of healthcare and stimulates collaboration between health professionals, policymakers, patients and designers.

As part of the exhibition, Next Nature Network presents a speculative design proposal for an artificial womb in collaboration with Máxima Medical Centre (MMC). This unique collaboration is part of an ongoing research by Next Nature Network into the impact of technology on the the future of biological reproduction, intimacy and relationships under the working title REPRODUTOPIA; how will we make babies, experience intimacy and build families in the future? In the future, artificial wombs could replace incubators as they mimic the natural environment of the female uterus. But what will these 'hatcheries' look like?

Chronic Health takes place at Innovation Powerhouse.

Augmented Nature 

A next generation high-tech biologging tag on a whale.

Due to our destructive human behavior, we are now living in the 6th mass extinction. As the damaging human behavior appears immutable, a team of designers and engineers from the Royal College of Art and Imperial College in London proposes an animal centered design approach. "[It's] an approach in which success is measured in biodiversity and humans acknowledge that they're part of the animal kingdom." The innovative project Augmented Nature manufactures animals to prevent man's best friends from mass extinction.

Augmented Nature is on show at Klokgebouw, Hall 2.

Frankenstein 

DDW18 is centered around the statement that we design our future: because if not us, then who? Perhaps the answer lies in artificial intelligence. Will algorithms design our future for us, with us or against us? The Frankenstein exhibition questions our responsibility over the technological systems that we create, and it speculates on the influence of the non-human other. The boundary between creator and creation, and thus the difference between the born and the made, may disappear. To date, the consequences are unknown. Will artificial life outsmart us in the future?

The exhibition Frankenstein (open all week) is part of the Frankenstein Symposium, moderated by our editor-in-chief Ruben Baart. The symposium takes place on October 22th at Natlab.

Robot Love

World's first six-handed massage with a human touch. Meet the Shiva Therapist.

In the extensive and interactive exhibition Robot Love, artists, designers and scientists explore the relation between humans and robots. What happens when humans and machines are fusing? Robots often cause fear to be overruled, fear to lose our jobs, or a feeling of anthropomorphobia. Still, society seems fascinated by them. In a way, Robot Love poses the crucial question: what excactly does it mean to be human - instead of a machine? Among the works are the Shiva Therapist from our HUBOT office, the film Renderlands of speculative architect Liam Young and the tickle massage project by Driessens&Verstappen.

Robot Love takes place at the Melkfabriek.

Clean Revolution

Insectology, Atelier Boelhouwer

Reducing the amount of waste, minimizing the use of non-renewable sources, closing the production cycle; the future of design is crammed with sustainable challenges. Clean Revolution presents a collection of Dutch designers who seek to transform trash into treasures and contribute to a circular economy. The exhibition is the perfect opportunity to spot innovative thought, and gain insight into modern-day design challenges. It features the work from Teresa van Dongen, Boyan Slat, Shahar Livne, and Lightyear - to name a few.

Clean Revolution is on show at Veem, Floor 3.

Visit the Dutch Design Week from 20-28 October in Eindhoven. Want more? Follow us on Instagram, here we feature the most inspiring #nextnature projects at DDW18 in the coming week!

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Today, there's an app for everything. They help us satisfy our cravings, allow us to communicate at all times and make it easier to share special moments. But the dark, cold screens of our smart phones, the de facto platform for these tools, simply don’t resonate with the sensorial aspects of our human needs.

What if we try to make our apps more sensitive? How can we extend our senses to make our apps work without a smart phone? This was the challenge for a group of participants of the Mexican education platform emerge MX. Together, we used the Pyramid of Technology to imagine a more natural version of our everyday apps.

Inspired by animals with extraordinary senses such as electroreception (sharks), tetrachromacy (mantis shrimp) and super sense of smell (moths), each team developed a new idea of how four different apps may work: Instagram, Tinder, WhatsApp and Rappi (a local food delivery service).

Envisioning the future of apps

The first team imagined WhatsApp as a neckpiece that would send and receive electrical signals translated into emotions, taking emojis to a naturalized level.

The Tinder team envisioned a bracelet that constantly measures our heart rate, sweating, dopamine and oxytocin levels. It then matches our results with nearby candidates that may be felling the same about us.

The Instagrammers went wild and created two scenarios. The first one involved eye drops that added tetrachromatic, ultraviolet and termic vision filters directly into our eyes. The second idea applied a layer of virtual reality filters projected on top of our surroundings.

Finally the Rappi team imagined a molar that works in conjunction with our smartphones spraying the smell and taste of the food we are watching on our screens, then interpretes our reaction and immediately sends our desired dish to our doors.

Uncontrollable nature

But not everything in these futures was perfect. The teams were also challenged to think on how these devices would get out of our hands and become uncontrollable. Using the 'Doomsday card' (one of the 'Question Cards' to the stimulate debate) they envisioned a WhatsApp that would share emotions we would prefer remain private; a Tinder that would eliminate the romance of relationships or that would expose aspects of our sexuality that we may prefer keep for someone special; an Instagram that would slowly blind us as we evolve, making our biological eyes a vestigial organ; and a Rappi app that may fail and spray a toxic substance into our mouths putting our lives at risk.

The Pyramid of Technology

The Next Nature workshop offered a platform for the exploratory thinking exhibited above. Altogether we achieved a deeper understanding of what technology is and how it can become more human. It also reminded us that it could quickly become a natural force out of our control and become a next nature.

The Pyramid of Technology is the next nature tool to facilitate this process. Would you like to attend, or host such a workshop? Well, we recently started the NNN Academy! Through interactive workshops, we explore what it means to build, design, and live in the next nature. Facilitated by our Pyramid of Technology Toolkit, and led by a trained NNN guide, the workshops offer a new way to discuss technology, facilitate brainstorms and catalyze innovative processes. Want to know more? Then visit this page!

[post_title] => Reimagining popular apps with the Pyramid of Technology [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => reimagining-apps-pyramid-of-technology [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 17:39:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 16:39:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91255 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71450 [post_author] => 1325 [post_date] => 2017-02-24 09:28:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-24 08:28:24 [post_content] => What is your digital footprint? Facebook knows it. Developers Regina Flores Mir and Hang Do Thi Duc created a new Chrome extension called the Data Selfie. The Data Selfie is an application developed to quantify your digital footprint is by looking at your media and social networks consumption. Every ‘like’ and ‘click’ on Facebook tells a story about you. Even the articles you read and where they come from.By using psychometrics, the Data Selfie can tell something about the person behind the computer. Its creators used the theory of the Big Five, a model based on five personality traits, and other subjects like religion and interests. The Big Five clarifies your score on openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism.The interesting question behind this is: do digital footprints match real life goals? "In my data selfie, it says I’m not likely to be concerned about the environment. I read that and said, that’s not even true! But it made me think about it. Is there a subtlety to the way I interact online that they can tell?", Regina Floris Mir says.The Data Selfie wants to make people aware of their online data identity and the underlying information about themselves they are sharing with the world.Source: Fast Co.Design [post_title] => Take Your Data Selfie [post_excerpt] => Do digital footprints match real life goals? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => data-selfie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-24 09:29:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-24 08:29:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71450/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70739 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-01-23 15:34:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-23 14:34:15 [post_content] => In 2003, broadcaster and author Mark Ovenden designed the World Metro Map to present a global transportation system that connects cities through underground railways. His vision could end up becoming reality after all, now that LA-based company Hyperloop One has selected 35 teams as finalists in its global challenge to design the future of the vacuum-sealed train system.“It’s more than just a train, or a pod in a tube” said Josh Giegel, Hyperloop One’s president of engineering. “We’re taking it to a level of connectivity and really being the high-speed backbone of the future transportation network”. The current plan is to build three regional routes over the next five years. After that, the Hyperloop One aims to connect all constructions and build a giant network, similar to Ovenden's vision. Needless to say the map may not be completely accurate, it’s already envisioning an intercontinental transit network that holds the potential to reshape the global economy. In short, the hyperloop will turn the world into a global village.Source: Inverse. Image: Mark Ovenden [post_title] => The Global Subway Map of the Future [post_excerpt] => The Hyperloop will turn the world into a global village. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hyperloop-global-map-concept [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-26 10:39:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-26 09:39:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70739/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69753 [post_author] => 1091 [post_date] => 2016-12-27 16:04:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-27 15:04:15 [post_content] => You don’t have to visit New York for a nice plastic souvenir of the Statue of Liberty anymore, you can easily 3D print one yourself. With 3D printing becoming more and more omnipresent, souvenirs of places you have never been to, and a load of other useless crap, are just a few clicks (and if you don’t own a 3D printer, a short walk to the nearest fablab) away.Additivism (a portmanteau of additive and activism) is a movement that calls for radical rethinking of new technologies, such as 3D printing, the plastification of the world and our human position within it. Additivism has declared that the world’s splendour has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of crap and detritus.According to them "your shiny plastic future is a load of crap". To move beyond the crapularity they launched the 3D Additivist Manifesto: a call to accelerate the development of the 3D printer and push it to their absolute limits and even beyond, into the speculative, the provocative and the weird. Additivism seeks the unexplored potential of the 3D printer. Because every new technology comes with unintended affects that can lead to new ideas, insights, products, and possibilities.[caption id="attachment_69798" align="aligncenter" width="495"]Additivism Additivism[/caption]The 3D Additivist Cookbook, edited by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke, presents speculative, imaginative and provocative works from more than 100 artists, activists and theorists. You can download the 3D Additivist Cookbook online in 3D PDF, including the 3D files or instructions you need to save turtles, print your own Nefertiti bust, or your favorite song.[caption id="attachment_69800" align="alignnone" width="495"]Additivism Additivism, 3D Additivist Cookbook[/caption]Source: 3D Additivist Cookbook. Images: Additivism [post_title] => Rethinking 3D Printing for the Future [post_excerpt] => Additivism is a movement that calls for radical rethinking of new technologies, such as 3D printing, the plastification of the world and our human position within it. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => rethinking-3d-printing-future [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-29 11:09:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-29 10:09:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69753 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69004 [post_author] => 1091 [post_date] => 2016-12-01 10:42:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-01 09:42:53 [post_content] => You don’t have to be an artist to know that it might be hard to make a living as one. The insecure position of hoping that all investments in time, materials and tools will eventually be repaid in visibility and sales leaves artists in a vulnerable position. Ultra Violet Production House is an ingenious working model for artists to lessen risks and debts of being an artist by making use of just in time production: a strategy that attempts to eliminate waste in over-production, waiting, transportation, processing, inventories and making defective products.UV Production House reflects on popular online platforms for maker culture: Pinterest, the place to go to get inspired; and Etsy, the place to sell whatever you DIY. Moreover, it plays on today’s native advantages of the Internet as an alternative and highly effective way of producing, selling and shipping art.Ultra Violet Production House is an Etsy store that sells IRL Photoshop hacks; re-combinations of pre-existing products found through on demand Internet retailers and web shops. The funny Photoshop hacks are inspired on the Internet’s endless blast of niche content. Main reference points are Pinterest tutorials and Survivalism (a movement that prepares for possible societal breakdowns).With UV Production House, founder-artists Josh Citarella and Brad Troemel are able to create art at a very high pace, and sell their artworks 24/7. No need for a fabrication studio, inventory, tools, complicated shipping procedures or clearances for visibility. The only things needed: a computer with Photoshop and an Internet connection.Upon purchase, UV Production House provides the buyer or collector with all materials, tools and a fabrication guide to create the original work of art. All artworks are equipped with a certificate of authenticity. Collectors are responsible for the realization of the works of art, which might arrive at different times and in several boxes. Selling and buying art has never been so easy.Your Mobile SOLAR Powered Tanning Canopy For Outdoors is only one click away!Source: Post-Digital Podcast. Image: UV Production House [post_title] => Photoshop Hacks Become In Real Life Art [post_excerpt] => UV Production House reflects on popular online platforms for maker culture. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => photoshop-hacks-become-real-life-art [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-02 12:46:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-02 11:46:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69004 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 67057 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-10-10 16:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-10 14:00:22 [post_content] => After graffiti drones in 2014, German aerial-photography group Cooper Copter is exploring “vandalism 2.0” with drones that throw paint bombs after Reeperbahn Festival invited the collective to develop a performance. The so-called Pollockocopter horizontally fires paint bombs at an enormous screen at a speed of 30 km/h and mimics the action-painting technique of Jackson Pollock, while simultaneously creating something new.Inspired by Max Ernst, American painter Jackson Pollock created his first drip painting in 1947, and was named "Jack the Dripper" by Time Magazine in 1956. Sixty years after, drones are emulating his avant-garde technique, paving the way for a technologically embedded future into the world of art.Earlier this year, a “new” Rembrandt was unveiled in Amsterdam. The artwork was not painted by Rembrandt himself, a 3D printer created it. Dubbed "The Next Rembrandt", the portrait is the product of 18 months analysis of 346 paintings and 150 gigabytes of digitally rendered graphics. With 13 layers of ink, the final work consists in more than 148 million pixels based on 168.263 painting fragments from Rembrandt’s oeuvre, leaving us perplexed about its uncanny results.Source: Cooper Copter [post_title] => Painted by Drones [post_excerpt] => German aerial-photography group Cooper Copter is exploring “vandalism 2.0” with drones that throw paint bombs. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-next-pollock [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-20 11:28:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-20 09:28:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=66504 [menu_order] => 57 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 67041 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2016-10-10 11:19:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-10 09:19:06 [post_content] => Don’t we all wish to look into someone else’s mind every once in a while? With the evolving technique called EEG, electroencephalography, we can measure brain activity and ultimately even read the brain. The newest inventions are becoming more and more portable, ready to be implemented into our everyday life.EEG works as follows: when your brain is active, little electrical pulses are exchanged between brain neurons. The EEG sensors recognizes those electrical exchanges; the more active your brain is, the more signals it sends out. The collected data are gathered in a map of your brain, that allows to see which fields are active. We already know this technique from fMRI scans, which are working more precise then EEG, though the scanners are bigger and the procedure take long time. Compared to fMRI, EEG is more exploitable in ordinary life, gathering realtime data and allowing the user to move around.[youtube]http://youtu.be/1ovv6lmPHSI[/youtube]Therefore, many researches are done to develop EEG headwear, like in-ear EEG, brain hacking devices hat fit inside the ear. Also the entertainment industry is impatiently waiting to create brain driven games, no controller needed, thinking about jumping will make your character jump. Another moment when your brain is active and your body rests is when you are asleep. Dreem is a headband that tracks your sleeping behavior by checking your brain activity. It sends out sounds to deepen your sleep. And while we are waiting for the self driving car, there is already a brain driven car, ideal for disabled people.These are just some of the benefits of using neuroscience in our future daily life. The biggest negative aspect is our privacy. Just like the personal data collected by our digital devices, EEG collects even more private information - your thoughts. When the inside of your head becomes a place where privacy is at stake, many ethic questions raise. For now EEG is still a very unprecise tool to measure brain acitivity, not knowing the exact content of your thoughts. But we can start think about the moment in which we will be able to exchange ‘.thought’ files with friends.Source: Futurism. Image: FocusBand [post_title] => Will We Share .thought Files? [post_excerpt] => With the evolving technique called EEG, electroencephalography, we can measure brain activity and ultimately even read the brain. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => save-dreams-thought [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-21 11:38:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-21 09:38:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=66052 [menu_order] => 56 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 107366 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2019-01-11 11:44:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-11 10:44:16 [post_content] =>

Welcome to the conversation! Every week, we’ll open up a new conversation among members of the network about next nature topics we've encountered around the globe. We hope Nextnature.net can serve as a thrilling platform for dialogue among our authors, members, and anyone interested in exploring the next nature with us. On behalf of the editorial team, welcome. – Koert van Mensvoort

What happened Genetic engineers in Illinois have designed super-size tobacco plants that grow as much as 40% larger than usual by tweaking the process that plants use to turn sunlight into food.
Why tobacco? Researchers work with tobacco because it grows quickly and is easy to genetically modify. The team is now making similar gene changes to potatoes, soybeans, and cowpeas.
Greener than you think In the US alone, average crop yields are only 20% of those produced during bumper crop seasons when conditions are ‘ideal’. In other words, during a typical growing season 80% of our food production is lost to pathogens and environmental stress. Genetically engineered plants have already solved some of these problems in an environmentally friendly way.
The bad news While the research is being conducted in the US, the EU has established a rather protectionist legal framework that puts the development of modern biotechnology, and more specifically of GMOs, on hold.
Societal debate A recent survey shows that fear of GMOs is increasing. Researchers believe it could take 20 years to get the new crops approved by regulators. However, reclaiming even a percentage of crop loss across the world would go a long way to meeting the 21st century’s rapidly expanding food demands, so it's certainly worth having a discussion about. Feel free to share your knowledge, thoughts and viewpoints with us in the Contribute section! ?

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