395 results for “Digital-Presence”

‘Play e-dead’ means to avoid being visibly active online

Teyosh
May 22nd 2019

Playing e-dead means to avoid being visibly active online because of not having answered to someone’s message or comment. This is a part of a social media code of conduct; if you haven’t answered to someone’s message or comment, it can only be justified by eleminating the use of social media.

However, it may be offensive if you don’t respond to someone’s message while you continue your daily online activities (which shows that you have plenty of time).

Some people …

‘(Un)postable’ is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media

Teyosh
April 26th 2019

When perceiving the world around us as a potential Instagram post, some thoughts, stories and situations can easily be packed into a tweet or a photo, while others are harder to mould into one. Remember when people were excited about how they would retell their story to friends when they meet? Now they have a chance to share it on the go.

To that end, perceiving life in a 'postable' manner can easily become addictive, as goes for the motivation …

Digital detoxes are a solution looking for a problem

David A Ellis
April 19th 2019

With New Year’s resolutions in full swing, many people may have chosen to cut down on their tech use – or even give it up altogether. The growing popularity of such “digital detoxes” is encouraged by a slew of negative findings about the effects of technology use, alongside claims that such action can help reduce stress and help people become more “present” and compassionate.

But frequent use of technology and social media isn’t a problem in itself. Despite reported claims, there’s currently little scientific evidence …

‘Clickvalue’ is the subjective value of someone’s like, retweet or share

Teyosh
February 5th 2019

Although all likes, shares, and retweets come from the same act of clicking, not all of them carry the same value. If you are in love, the most valuable like will be the one from your crush. If you are seeking professional support, the most valuable retweet will come from your renowned colleague.

Unlike the currency of offline life, where every dollar is the same, no matter who it is coming from, the currency of online life consists of clicking …

‘Forcie’ is a selfie that you don’t voluntarily take part in

Teyosh
January 9th 2019

There are many reasons why somebody doesn’t want to take a photo at a certain place in a certain moment or with a certain people and put it online. The reason might be anything from a bad hair day to privacy concerns (yes, there are those who still care about it). But when somebody is a selfie enthusiast no excuse is good enough.…

‘Thrillification’ is thrill about getting notifications

Teyosh
October 8th 2018

Checking for new notifications has become a habit that is hard to resist. For some users of social networks it is a kind of an impulse. When receiving and opening notifications, users of social networks get a hit of dopamine which is released in rewarding situations.

Social networks are now part of our emotional life. Humans are social creatures. We can not survive in solitude. It is well known that communication in the offline life keeps us motivated and active, …

‘e-End’ means removing a person from online life

Teyosh
October 2nd 2018

When two people have a fight it is not really the end until it’s e-end. We finally have a chance to kick somebody out of our lives. People typically remove someone from friends or block them if they had a fight, have broken up or are just annoyed by that person.

Some people decide to block or unfriend their exes on certain social networks as an act of rage but decide to keep them on another so they can check …

‘Overpresent’ means to actively exist both offline and online

Teyosh
September 24th 2018

Physics teaches us that it is not possible to be present at two places at the same time. However, some users of social networks seriously challenge that fact. The amount of content they post really makes it seem like they literally post every moment of their life, but at the same time they do manage to have a life as well (at least according to their posts)!

One could argue that for such a user, posting is the core of …

Gamers are the new athletes: Sports in video games from Pong to VR

Jack Caulfield
June 27th 2018

Sports have always had an important place in human societies, providing entertainment, exercise, and a demonstration of the exceptional things the human body can achieve. But in a world of increasingly blurred lines between physical and virtual activities, what new forms of athletics are coming into existence? Let's look at the games turning sports digital.…

The Dictionary of Online Behavior adds a virtual layer to your vocabulary

Ruben Baart
June 21st 2018

To some extent, it's a chicken-and-egg question: Are you unable to think about things you don't have words for, or do you lack words for them because you don't think about them? For digital natives, the online realms may become more familiar than aspects of the ‘real’ world - and that's where the Dictionary of Online Behavior comes in; a growing library for the avid social media user that you need to know to get by.…

WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [tag] => digital-presence [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => )[query_vars] => Array ( [tag] => digital-presence [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [cat] => [tag_id] => 92 [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( )[category__and] => Array ( )[post__in] => Array ( )[post__not_in] => Array ( )[post_name__in] => Array ( )[tag__in] => Array ( )[tag__not_in] => Array ( )[tag__and] => Array ( )[tag_slug__in] => Array ( [0] => digital-presence )[tag_slug__and] => Array ( )[post_parent__in] => Array ( )[post_parent__not_in] => Array ( )[author__in] => Array ( )[author__not_in] => Array ( )[ignore_sticky_posts] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => )[tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[field] => term_id [operator] => NOT IN [include_children] => )[1] => Array ( [taxonomy] => post_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => digital-presence )[field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ))[relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships )[queried_terms] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => digital-presence )[field] => slug ))[primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID )[meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( )[relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( )[clauses:protected] => Array ( )[has_or_relation:protected] => )[date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 92 [name] => Digital-Presence [slug] => digital-presence [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 95 [taxonomy] => post_tag [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 395 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 92 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (95) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91144 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2019-05-22 15:03:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-22 14:03:08 [post_content] =>

Playing e-dead means to avoid being visibly active online because of not having answered to someone’s message or comment. This is a part of a social media code of conduct; if you haven’t answered to someone’s message or comment, it can only be justified by eleminating the use of social media.

However, it may be offensive if you don’t respond to someone’s message while you continue your daily online activities (which shows that you have plenty of time).

Some people therefore choose to avoid all social networks until they reply — which is the only proper way not to get busted for playing e-dead — but for most of us, it's easier to be inactive only on the social network that the message was delivered to.

Note: this is the obvious sign of playing e-dead.

Constant availability and being connected comes at its price; we are not always in the mood to socialize and meet the expectations of online social norms.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'Play e-dead' means to avoid being visibly active online [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => e-dead [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-24 10:53:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-24 09:53:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91144 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91135 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2019-04-26 14:43:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-26 13:43:14 [post_content] =>

When perceiving the world around us as a potential Instagram post, some thoughts, stories and situations can easily be packed into a tweet or a photo, while others are harder to mould into one. Remember when people were excited about how they would retell their story to friends when they meet? Now they have a chance to share it on the go.

To that end, perceiving life in a 'postable' manner can easily become addictive, as goes for the motivation behind the moment of going somewhere or doing something; it engages us to interact with our gadgets—rather than our immediate environment.

(Un)postable is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => '(Un)postable' is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => unpostable [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-16 11:08:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-16 10:08:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91135 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 110460 [post_author] => 2028 [post_date] => 2019-04-19 11:39:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-19 10:39:57 [post_content] =>

With New Year’s resolutions in full swing, many people may have chosen to cut down on their tech use – or even give it up altogether. The growing popularity of such “digital detoxes” is encouraged by a slew of negative findings about the effects of technology use, alongside claims that such action can help reduce stress and help people become more “present” and compassionate.

But frequent use of technology and social media isn’t a problem in itself. Despite reported claims, there’s currently little scientific evidence that digital detoxes have any benefits. In fact, giving up your devices completely could have its own unintended negative consequences.

Cause or effect

One of the reasons that digital detoxes seem good for us is the misconception that technology is inherently harmful. There are numerous studies that link excessive technology use with poorer sleep, increased depressive symptoms, and higher levels of anxiety.

But while studies ask participants questions about how much they use technology and how depressed or anxious they are, they are unable to explain the direction of any effect. Essentially, we cannot tell if they use social media because they are depressed, or they are depressed because they use social media. And, of course, many other factors might explain why a person feels depressed or anxious.

We cannot tell if they use social media because they are depressed, or they are depressed because they use social media.

Most studies also rely on self-reported estimates of technology use, which often don’t reflect reality. Studies that rely on people self-reporting may get inaccurate information. Interestingly, when time in front of a screen is measured automatically by an application or device, depression and anxiety severity aren’t associated with total smartphone usage.

Research often tends to treat all technology use as equal. This assumption overlooks the fact that we have a different experience with each kind of technology we use. For example, mindlessly scrolling Instagram is very different to chatting on WhatsApp, or using a fitness tracker.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH), the UK body representing doctors who specialise in children, recently arguedthat screen time is not “toxic” to health and that the evidence for harm is overstated. But negative findings continue to have a greater influence on public opinion as they appear more frequently in the popular press. This can sometimes lead to a vicious cycle where research responds directly to “hoax” media claims. The results then generate even more alarming headlines.

Giving up your digital existence

Meanwhile, there’s little evidence that digital detoxes actually have any benefit. The majority of what exists is based on anecdotes rather than scientific studies. Some arguments might seem sensible, such as that giving up technology may encourage people to be more physically active. But again, no research has demonstrated that this is actually true.

Giving up technology also means giving up the good things about it. For example, smartphones and social media help people communicate and socialise, which is known to increase happiness. So it’s not surprising that some studies have found complete withdrawal from social media can have adverse consequences such as lower satisfactionboredom, feelings of social pressure, and fear.

Smartphones and social media help people communicate and socialise, which is known to increase happiness.

While giving up a digital existence for a short time may let people reconnect with other aspects of their lives, this is often a temporary state that is impossible to maintain. Most people will simply return to prior habits that have become an essential part of everyday life.

Age-old concerns

People have always been concerned about almost every mass-adopted technology invented, and social media and smartphones are no different. But the idea that screen-based technologies are harming society continues to be a source of considerable debate surrounded by questionable evidence and media hype. As more research is completed, it’s important that findings are presented carefully to prevent further misinterpretation and fear-mongering.

When it comes to digital detoxes, there is unlikely to be anything seriously wrong with stepping away from technology for the majority of people. But the notion that they’re a “good idea”, or that they have any lasting effects, is yet to be supported by science. In fact, seeing as there’s little evidence to suggest that technology is inherently bad, it might be that digital detoxes have no problem to solve in the first place.

There’s little evidence to suggest that technology is inherently bad

While the evidence we do have is patchy from decades of bad practice, the truth is slowly emerging with improved methods. This is starting to suggest that technology use is not harmful in itself. As politicians consider the impact, they should be mindful of these developments.

This article is written by David A. Ellis, 50th Anniversary Lecturer, Psychology, Lancaster University and Brittany I. Davidson, Doctoral Researcher, University of Bath. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.
Image: Andrew Brookes

[post_title] => Digital detoxes are a solution looking for a problem [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => digital-detoxes-are-a-solution-looking-for-a-problem [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-19 11:40:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-19 10:40:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=110460 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91173 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2019-02-05 11:34:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-05 10:34:25 [post_content] =>

Although all likes, shares, and retweets come from the same act of clicking, not all of them carry the same value. If you are in love, the most valuable like will be the one from your crush. If you are seeking professional support, the most valuable retweet will come from your renowned colleague.

Unlike the currency of offline life, where every dollar is the same, no matter who it is coming from, the currency of online life consists of clicking like, retweet and share where not every click has the same value.

Clickvalue depends on who the person that reacted to our post is, how popular online they are at the moment, what our personal relationship to them is, how often they like our posts and other people’s posts (if they have a like generator, their click basically has no value).

In general, most valuable likes are from the people who are popular and who we are trying to impress. Least valuable likes are from our moms ( love you, mom <3 ).

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'Clickvalue' is the subjective value of someone’s like, retweet or share [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => clickvalue [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-02-07 18:05:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-02-07 17:05:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91173 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91154 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2019-01-09 11:22:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-09 10:22:47 [post_content] =>

There are many reasons why somebody doesn’t want to take a photo at a certain place in a certain moment or with a certain people and put it online. The reason might be anything from a bad hair day to privacy concerns (yes, there are those who still care about it). But when somebody is a selfie enthusiast no excuse is good enough.

Probably no one is concerned about the photo itself. Taking a photo is one thing, but posting it publicly is a completely other. And that is what causes the discomfort mainly. The discomfort can also be caused by the awkward pose that selfie taker asks you to make. Some people just don’t feel comfortable making duck faces.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'Forcie' is a selfie that you don’t voluntarily take part in [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => forcie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-13 14:56:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-13 13:56:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91154 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91372 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2018-10-08 18:14:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-10-08 17:14:35 [post_content] =>

Checking for new notifications has become a habit that is hard to resist. For some users of social networks it is a kind of an impulse. When receiving and opening notifications, users of social networks get a hit of dopamine which is released in rewarding situations.

Social networks are now part of our emotional life. Humans are social creatures. We can not survive in solitude. It is well known that communication in the offline life keeps us motivated and active, but so does the communication in the online life. If there are very few interactions in the online life, the person might decide not to participate in it anymore. Social interaction, both in offline and online life, confirms that we are alive and visible to other people.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'Thrillification' is thrill about getting notifications [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => thrillification [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 13:49:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 12:49:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91372 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91248 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2018-10-02 11:32:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-10-02 10:32:17 [post_content] =>

When two people have a fight it is not really the end until it’s e-end. We finally have a chance to kick somebody out of our lives. People typically remove someone from friends or block them if they had a fight, have broken up or are just annoyed by that person.

Some people decide to block or unfriend their exes on certain social networks as an act of rage but decide to keep them on another so they can check their lives occasionally. Blocking is more radical because the other person is effectively silenced. It is intended as a protection from cyberbullies and stalkers but people use it in all kinds of scenarios. Sometimes people block someone in the middle of the argument so that they get to have the last word.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'e-End' means removing a person from online life [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => e-end-means-removing-a-person-from-online-life [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 17:40:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 16:40:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91248 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91202 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2018-09-24 14:05:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-24 13:05:26 [post_content] =>

Physics teaches us that it is not possible to be present at two places at the same time. However, some users of social networks seriously challenge that fact. The amount of content they post really makes it seem like they literally post every moment of their life, but at the same time they do manage to have a life as well (at least according to their posts)!

One could argue that for such a user, posting is the core of their life but there is a strong evidence in their posts that they actually do have a stable job, teach yoga, have a child, write a book and travel all over the world.. So they must have spent time learning, practicing, changing diapers, writing and packing, but the question is WHEN?

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

Cover art: The Rodina for Teyosh

[post_title] => 'Overpresent' means to actively exist both offline and online [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => overpresent [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 17:01:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 16:01:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91202 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79059 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2018-06-27 09:15:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-27 08:15:10 [post_content] => Sports have always had an important place in human societies, providing entertainment, exercise, and a demonstration of the exceptional things the human body can achieve. But in a world of increasingly blurred lines between physical and virtual activities, what new forms of athletics are coming into existence? Let's look at the games turning sports digital.

Sports as Games

Games have been trying to recreate athletic activities in one form or another ever since Pong. Early attempts were hamstrung by the limited graphical fidelity attainable at the time, and by the simplicity of the controls. In early games, controls were too imprecise, and visuals too basic, to make a very convincing representation of real sport.Fast-forward a few decades, and we're in an era where sport simulation games like Fifa and NBA 2K are as popular as their real-world counterparts. Obviously, graphics have improved massively as technology has advanced over the years, and we've gone from abstract shapes to character models which approach photorealism.Just as important to the rise of sports games is the wide array of new control schemes available. The preponderance of increasingly sensitive analog joysticks, which allow for much more precise control than older devices, certainly helps.

Feeling the action

But more radical changes have also taken place to make video game controls feel more like the actions they're meant to simulate. Take the rise of motion controls, which were popularized largely by the appearance of the Nintendo Wii in 2006. Suddenly, gamers were not merely pressing a button to make their player swing the bat, but actually swinging the remote themselves to make it happen – though they had to be careful.A few years later, Microsoft launched the Kinect, a camera attachment for the Xbox which allowed for tracking players' movements visually rather than kinetically. Kinect-enabled sports games had players mimicking the actions of athletes to make their on-screen avatars move.In recent years, the big trend in immersive gaming technology is of course virtual reality. While VR's priciness has so far limited its popularity, it's already fascinating to see what games like VR Sports are doing with the technology. Where previous technologies increased immersion by making players really perform the actions of their virtual avatars, the draw of VR is its ability to make gamers feel like they are really there.It might not be too long before we see all these different elements combined into a completely convincing sports simulation. It's not hard to imagine a future in which the Olympics feature virtual competitions athletes can compete in from across the globe. Will the sports of the future take place in the realm of the virtual just as much as the physical? See you in 2020! [post_title] => Gamers are the new athletes: Sports in video games from Pong to VR [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => gamers-new-athletes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-28 13:36:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-28 12:36:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79059/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 82061 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2018-06-21 19:34:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-21 18:34:56 [post_content] => To some extent, it's a chicken-and-egg question: Are you unable to think about things you don't have words for, or do you lack words for them because you don't think about them? For digital natives, the online realms may become more familiar than aspects of the ‘real’ world - and that's where the Dictionary of Online Behavior comes in; a growing library for the avid social media user that you need to know to get by.The Dictionary "offers new tools to reflect upon online reality," says TeYosh, the artist duo behind the project. "At this point, we still know the dual meaning of a friend and differentiate online friends from the ones we shook hands with," they explain."The ephemeral words in the DoOB describe a moment in history when the online relationships are still not a norm." But then again, you could ask yourself; how often do you read a message without opening it? Or, how do you even determine whether you're going out with that Tinder match before looking up their Instagram account?All too painful, yet all too real, The DoOB reflects upon the reality in which we are all living in right now, "[it's] a view from the perspective of the last generation that had a chance to grow up in the offline world and got the know the online world as something new, something other."Introducing a world's first on Nextnature.net: A visual interview - because sometimes, a picture says so much more than words.

How does the dictionary of online behavior relate to traditional dictionaries?

What's the response been like?

Have you seen people taking new approaches to deal with language ever since you launched the website?

Do you have a recent favorite piece of technology, virtual or physical, that helps achieve the language you're promoting?

What do you make of the lingual rituals we perform today? (LOL, ICYMI, WTF - and other acronyms)

Does our intuitive understanding of new language rely on analogies to old ones?

Are we witnessing the beginning of the end of written language?

Will good writing become a niche specialty? And does this standardization of simple ‘language’ have a role in representing our actual society and reality?

What’s your favorite thing to do on the Internet?

What kind of gadgets do you use?

How would you describe the way that you think about the Internet?

What's wrong with the way we think or talk about the Internet? (if applicable)

What do you want from social media?

Finish the sentence: The Internet needs new

_____________________The Dictionary of Online Behavior is a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication. Do you want to take part in the visual interview series? Join NNN and let us know! [post_title] => The Dictionary of Online Behavior adds a virtual layer to your vocabulary [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dictionary-of-online-behavior [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-29 10:57:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-29 09:57:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=82061 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91144 [post_author] => 1670 [post_date] => 2019-05-22 15:03:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-22 14:03:08 [post_content] =>

Playing e-dead means to avoid being visibly active online because of not having answered to someone’s message or comment. This is a part of a social media code of conduct; if you haven’t answered to someone’s message or comment, it can only be justified by eleminating the use of social media.

However, it may be offensive if you don’t respond to someone’s message while you continue your daily online activities (which shows that you have plenty of time).

Some people therefore choose to avoid all social networks until they reply — which is the only proper way not to get busted for playing e-dead — but for most of us, it's easier to be inactive only on the social network that the message was delivered to.

Note: this is the obvious sign of playing e-dead.

Constant availability and being connected comes at its price; we are not always in the mood to socialize and meet the expectations of online social norms.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'Play e-dead' means to avoid being visibly active online [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => e-dead [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-24 10:53:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-24 09:53:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91144 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 391 [max_num_pages] => 40 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => e4153d4eca25fdac8dfbad03a59dd099 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
load more