41 results for “ECO Coin”

Who should win the ECO Coin Award 2019?

NextNature.net
October 31st 2019

Each year we celebrate ecological heroes as part of our ECO Coin Award and this year is no different. Have you seen an inspiring person who is making the world a more sustainable place? Let us know!

Why an ECO Coin (Award?)

Consider this: When you cut a tree and sell the wood, you will earn money. When you plant a tree, you are creating value, but you won’t get paid. In short, our ecology and economy are out of balance. …

Elzelinde van Doleweerd wins the ECO Coin Award 2018

NextNature.net
December 17th 2018

The ECO Coin Award honours outstanding ecological heroes. In 2015, we handed out our first ECO Coin award to Yoyo Yogasamana for his digitalization of sustainable knowledge to preserve more than 130 existing rice varieties without any use of insecticides. In 2016 the award was given to Dave Hakkens for his ambitious open source precious plastics recycling machine. In 2017, Sandra Rey won the award for her work in the field of bioluminescence. …

3D-printing food waste into tasty products

Meike Schipper
November 27th 2018

Globally, humans produce enough food to feed 10 billion people (we are only 7 billion now) yet somehow we waste a third of this. Food waste is one of the biggest climate challenges of our time. Luckily there are some brilliant ideas out there aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects. These nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions …

How an app is helping restaurants cut food waste

Meike Schipper
November 14th 2018

Globally, humans produce enough food to feed 10 billion people (we are only 7 billion now) yet somehow we waste a third of this. Food waste is one of the biggest climate challenges of our time. Luckily there are some brilliant ideas out there aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects. These nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions …

Turning surplus bread into craft beer

Meike Schipper
November 7th 2018

Globally, humans produce enough food to feed 10 billion people (we are only 7 billion now) yet somehow we waste a third of this. Food waste is one of the biggest climate challenges of our time. Luckily, there are some brilliant ideas out there aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects. These nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions …

The future of the ECO Coin

Koen Blezer
June 26th 2018

How can we design a cryptocurrency for the better of humanity and ecology? In this last chapter of the crypto deep dive series, we will dissect two kinds of blockchain cryptocurrencies that are currently making waves on the internet and beyond. Furthermore, we explore the waves of the ECO Coin framework that intends to bring humans a democratic system - with living trees - into this sustainable, communal cryptocurrency.…

Getting rid of that bit of unspoiled green

Sanne vander Beek
June 14th 2018

There it is. A hefty hen, with its head up high and its beak out. And a gigantic VR headset over its beady little eyes. What does this battery hen see? ‘An experience of a free life’, according to American designer Austin Stewart. Second Livestock – shown last year at the ‘Robotic Wilderness’ exhibition of the Transnatural collective – is uncomfortable to watch, but it does uncover accurately the relationship we currently have with nature. Because no, this is not …

The return of direct democracy: Introducing a digital agora to the crypto-world

Koen Blezer
June 11th 2018

In Ancient Greece the people were part of a direct-democracy, this means that they would directly vote for policies and laws. Nowadays, it seems as though this horizontal approach to governance of a community is desired again: The crypto world has developed a specific platform to enable direct democracies to their users; the Decentralized Autonomous Organisations (DAO’s). What could these DAO’s mean for the ECO Coin? May these revive the ancient buzzing agora, this time in the digital sphere?…

The future infrastructure of the blockchain might be green and humane

Koen Blezer
April 25th 2018

The connection we share through the Internet has laid the foundation for a whole new digital infrastructure, in which blockchain technology is heralded by many believers for being the future of both our money and our internet infrastructure. However, the future of this technology and its applicability is not so certain as many blockchain evangelists will have you believe. This makes us wonder, how exactly are we going to build our collective and digital future? Can we make it less …

Here’s all you need to know about the future of the ECO Coin (and how it came about)

NextNature.net
April 22nd 2018

Today is Earth Day! This means that we think about the relationship between man, nature and technology, as technology is becoming a nature of its own. Acknowledged in 192 countries, Earth Day is among the most widely celebrated eco-events across the world. Today it focuses on creating awareness about our planet and demonstrating support for environmental protection.

Now, what have you done to protect the environment? Took the bike to work last week? Had a meat-free lunch? Tell us on …

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Each year we celebrate ecological heroes as part of our ECO Coin Award and this year is no different. Have you seen an inspiring person who is making the world a more sustainable place? Let us know!

Why an ECO Coin (Award?)

Consider this: When you cut a tree and sell the wood, you will earn money. When you plant a tree, you are creating value, but you won’t get paid. In short, our ecology and economy are out of balance. That's why we launched the ECO Coin, an alternative currency to express environmental value. This is how we connect economy and ecology. Learn more about the ECO Coin.

The ECO Coin Award then, honors outstanding ecological heroes of all kinds. It seeks to inspire others by showcasing the projects that work with nature and technology in innovative ways.

What are you looking for in a winner?

We search for people working on projects that are community driven, use nature and technology in an innovative way, and share their knowledge with others. It could be someone working on a new sustainable energy source, a person developing a greener transportation system or somebody who seeks to clean polluted air. There's just one rule: It should be a person (so Burger King introducing vegan burgers does not apply, sorry).

Who are the previous winners of the ECO Coin Award?

In 2015, we handed out our first ECO Coin award to Yoyo Yogasamana for his digitalization of sustainable knowledge to preserve more than 130 existing rice varieties without any use of insecticides. In 2016 the award was given to Dave Hakkens for his ambitious open source precious plastics recycling machine. In 2017, Sandra Rey won the award for her work in the field of bioluminescence. In 2018, we handed the award to Elzelinde Doleweerd for utilizing the technology of 3D printing to upcycle food waste into edible products.

How to nominate someone today?

That's easy, simply head to ecocoin.com and share your nomination (and yes, you can nominate yourself). You can also nominate someone by commenting on this story below.

🏁 Deadline for submissions: 1 December 2019.

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The ECO Coin Award honours outstanding ecological heroes. In 2015, we handed out our first ECO Coin award to Yoyo Yogasamana for his digitalization of sustainable knowledge to preserve more than 130 existing rice varieties without any use of insecticides. In 2016 the award was given to Dave Hakkens for his ambitious open source precious plastics recycling machine. In 2017, Sandra Rey won the award for her work in the field of bioluminescence. 

This year, the ECO coin Award focused on the issue of food waste. Globally, 30–40% of food produced for consumption is wasted every year. Luckily, we found some brilliant innovators, companies and communities aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects.   

Toast Ale has been nominated for its large-scale efforts to turn surplus bread into tasteful beers. Too Good to Go offers an application that connects restaurants with individual customers who can buy their surplus food before it is wasted. Upprinting Food is a young company, founded by Elzelinde van Doleweerd, utilizing the technology of 3D printing to upcycle food waste into edible products.

All nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions on the future of food. We believe that they are all doing an amazing job reducing food waste in an innovative and community focused way, but there can only be one winner. Last Friday we had the pleasure to hand over the ECO Coin Award 2018 to this year’s winner: Elzelinde van Doleweerd with Upprinting Food!


The NNN jury found that her work really captured the imagination of our readers. Using the technology of 3D printing to upcycle surplus foods is a strong and innovative concept that could truly change the world for the better. The project combines an idealistic vision with practical solutions and shows great promise for future. We are very curious how the project will develop in the upcoming years. Congratulations!


Thank you for all the submissions for the ECO Coin Award, a special thanks to our finalists and once again congratulations to Elzelinde van Doleweerd!

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Globally, humans produce enough food to feed 10 billion people (we are only 7 billion now) yet somehow we waste a third of this. Food waste is one of the biggest climate challenges of our time. Luckily there are some brilliant ideas out there aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects. These nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions on the future of food.

As part of our quest to this year’s winner, we’re interviewing each of the three finalists to learn about their values, insights and future visions. The third and final nominee is Upprinting Food, a young company utilizing the technology of 3D printing to upcycle food waste into edible products. The project is developed by Elzelinde van Doleweerd, Industrial Design student at Eindhoven University of Technology. In this Q&A, we talk to her about her inspiration, work process and future goals.

How and when did you get into the topic of food design?

I love to cook and I enjoy to express my creativity in the kitchen when experimenting with ingredients. Next to that, I followed a bachelor in Industrial Design at the Eindhoven University of Technology and simultaneously worked in a kitchen.

Because of my interests in both food and design, I preferred to really focus my vision on food design. To gain more knowledge in this topic, I did a minor in Food Technology in Wageningen. Afterwards, I finished my bachelor in Eindhoven with the food design project Upprinting Food. Because the project was well received, I recently started a company together with Vita Broeken to develop Upprinting Food further and bring it to the market.

How do you go from food waste to 3D printed products?

The 3D printed food is made from residual food flows of several ingredients. I started using bread, because bread is the number one wasted food product in the Netherlands. Next to that, we use fruits and vegetables which are often thrown away, because they are too ripe or not beautiful enough to be sold. And when we went to Beijing with this project, we used cooked rice instead of bread.

To create a printable food paste, we came up with several recipes in which we combine different food products. We mash and sieve the pastes and create more interesting flavours by adding herbs and spices. The printable food pastes consist for more than 75% out of residual food flows.

The printable food pastes consist for more than 75% out of residual food flows.

We fill a syringe with this paste and we insert this in the printer. We create 2D and 3D designs on the computer, which can be send to the printer. When the food is printed, we bake and dehydrate to food, to create a crunchy structure and to be able to save the food for a very long period.

What challenges did you encounter in the development of the project?

The biggest challenge was to create a printable food paste from bread, fruit and vegetables. When I first succeeded in doing this, the structure was very tough and not very nice to eat. After more than 80 experiments, I finally created the first two printable recipes from residual food flows with a nice taste and crunchy structure.

You recently exhibited the project at the Dutch Design Week 2018. What kind of reactions did you get?

People thought it was beautiful! They were very enthusiastic about the food structures, the dishes we prepared with the samples and the food they could try. People were curious about the contents of the different samples and they gave several suggestions on what to do with it. Some people actually did not believe that is was edible at all! Also, we received interests from restaurants and several interesting potential partners.

The project is still quite small-scale. What are the possibilities of upscaling and industrializing it?

We are going to follow a traject to really upscale the process and to bring it to the market. In order to make the process faster, we need to upscale the printer to include multiple nozzles and a larger paste "tank". We are currently working with a developer to create a new printer for us.

Furthermore, we are planning to do some market analysis, talking to cooks, farmers, restaurant owners, consumers, etc. to figure out what their needs and wishes are.

What will be the next step in the Upprinting Food project?

The next step for us now is to work with restaurants. We want to analyze their residual food flows, to create new recipes for printable food pastes out of those ingredients and to print it in beautiful shapes which can be implemented again beautifully in the food they serve.

Future steps of the technology might include creating food from residuals from supermarkets and bringing that back into the supermarket to be able to sell it on a large scale. We could also look into how we could use the printer to create foods, which can be shipped internationally to prevent hunger in other countries.

In the meantime we are working on new recipes and designs, with different food ingredients. Residual food flows change with the seasons and therefore our recipes should change and grow according to these residues.

Lastly, we have several (international) exhibitions planned in our agenda, showing people how beautiful 'food waste' can be and getting in contact with more restaurants.

Showing people how beautiful 'food waste' can be

You're nominated for the ECO Coin award, which celebrates innovations in sustainability. How do you feel your work fits in with broader sustainability efforts?

Next to processing Upprinting Food with residual food flows in the restaurant sector, we want to show consumers how much food, which they normally throw away, is actually still edible. Most people enjoy the printed foods if they see the beautiful structures, but when we tell them that it is actually made from residual food flows, they are quite surprised of what kind of beautiful, tasty food you can still create out of those food flows.

In doing so we hope they will be more conscious about the food they throw away. But also that they start asking questions about other forms of food waste, for example the "ugly" produce that is not sold. Hoping that eventually people will give value to these products and become more creative with their residual food.

Do you think that Upprinting Food should win the ECO Coin Award 2018? Cast your vote by tapping the heart below!

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Globally, humans produce enough food to feed 10 billion people (we are only 7 billion now) yet somehow we waste a third of this. Food waste is one of the biggest climate challenges of our time. Luckily there are some brilliant ideas out there aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects. These nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions on the future of food.

As part of our quest to this year’s winner, we’re interviewing each of the three finalists to learn about their values, insights and future visions. We are excited to introduce you to nominee Too Good to Go, a mobile application that connects restaurants with individual customers who can buy their surplus food before it is wasted. The app has only be launched less than two years ago and has been exploding in popularity ever since. At the moment, Too Good to Go is active in 7 European countries. In this Q&A, they tell us more about their drive, vision and future plans.

You originally launched the app in 2016 in Denmark. What triggered you at the time to take action and tackle food waste?

The world population is increasing significantly. Currently we are inhabiting the planet with over 7 billion people and are expected to grow to 20 billion by the year 2050.

Unfortunately, our current food system is not capable of sustaining the increasing population, to do so a transformation is necessary on multiple levels. A few key challenges come to mind when analysing our food system: The range of land needed for cultivating and agriculture, the large amounts of water and energy needed for the food system, and the fact that one third of all food produced is wasted somewhere within the supply chain.

All these challenges are intertwined and have a huge environmental impact, but this last challenge specifically is why Too Good To Go was founded. This is also the foundation of our vision which is:

All the produced food in the world = food consumed.

Why did you choose to focus specifically on food waste of the catering and retail sector?

Our core business is food waste which means we are constantly looking for new ways to broaden our horizon. 19% of the food wasted occurs within the catering and retail sector, 39% occurs within production and the largest amount of waste occurs within households, 49%. This means we are building our community to inspire and empower them to be part of this movement, which hopefully spreads and creates awareness with all stakeholders and especially in households.

In your experience, what makes the application so effective?

Simplicity - we made sure it would be attractive for everybody to join the app and mission.
The way the business model works is that consumers pay in the app and we keep a small fee after which we transfer the money to the stores. No cure no pay, consumers get a good deal, stores get money for their surplus food and most importantly, the food is eaten instead of thrown out. Everybody wins!

Also we entered the market at the right time. The overall interest in environmental protection and our food system is at an all-time high. This is why Too Good To Go is welcomed by so many people and the involvement is so high.

The concept behind the app is quite straightforward. Do you believe that solving the issue can be as simple as connecting producers with consumers at the right time?

As mentioned earlier there are many different challenges concerning this issue in society. We are aware that the app is not the solution, but we believe it is a start. The major improvements need to be supported by a horizontal movement. Food waste has 3 angles: environmental, economic and social, but we cannot take it all at the same time. Creating that movement and overall awareness will hopefully result in more action throughout the entire chain. Being the world’s biggest B2C platform against food waste, we can conclude the movement has begun and we are having a positive impact.

The movement has begun and we are having a positive impact.

What is the biggest challenge that you encountered in tackling the issue of food waste?

It wasn’t easy convincing stores to join in the beginning. But we managed to find 25 brave entrepreneurs in Amsterdam and we were very closely involved in the consumer experience.

After a tough start we have found amazing traction and have managed to scale up significantly. Today we have over 800 stores live on our app with whom we have saved over 130,000 meals. Our community consists of over 200,000 people only in the Netherlands.

And guess what: we were able to convince some of the biggest Dutch chains and retailers many of whom you know like HEMA and Albert Heijn.

What are your current and future plans for Too Good To Go? Will you continue to spread your service all over the globe?

At Too Good To Go we dream big, and we dream of the moment where the movement is big and strong enough to influence and transform the entire food system!

You’re nominated for the ECO Coin award, which celebrates innovations in sustainability. How do you feel your work fits in with broader sustainability efforts?

First of all, we feel honoured to be nominated for the ECO Coin Award 2018! It means that our impact is becoming more tangible, the movement is growing and most importantly, the awareness on the topic of food waste is growing as well.

But the word sustainability has become increasingly popular and sometimes it is important to take a step back and take a moment to think about what this word really means. The word sustainability is very broad and lacks clarity and understanding. At Too Good To Go we don’t focus on sustainability, but we are all connected by our core values to tackle the issue of food waste. We believe in a broader focus on impact, values and change.

Do you think that Too Good to Go should win the ECO Coin Award 2018? Cast your vote by tapping the heart below!

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Globally, humans produce enough food to feed 10 billion people (we are only 7 billion now) yet somehow we waste a third of this. Food waste is one of the biggest climate challenges of our time. Luckily, there are some brilliant ideas out there aiming to tackle this global problem. The ECO coin Award 2018 looks to recognise these innovators and has nominated 3 international projects. These nominees caught our attention with their out-of-the-box concepts, international communities and strong visions on the future of food.

As part of our quest to this year’s winner, we’re interviewing each of the three finalists to learn about their values, insights and future visions. Today we have a Q&A with nominee Toast Ale, a company that makes beer from leftover bread. The company is founded in 2016 by Tristram Stuart, a campaigner on the environmental and social impacts of our food system. In the UK, bread is on top of the most wasted food items, and Toast Ale is on a mission to bring this to an end.

The first beer recipe discovered 4,000 years ago, used bread as a key ingredient. How did you come up with the idea to reintroduce it?

It was in 2015 when the guys at Brussels Beer Project explained how they followed an ancient recipe for making beer from bread. Our founder, Tristram Stuart, immediately saw the three key ingredients for Toast Ale: he knew where industrial quantities of day fresh bread were being wasted all over the world; at the same time, the craft brewing movement had become a global super trend, and finally, Tristram had spent the past 20 years catalysing a global movement of food waste activists and entrepreneurs. Bring all these three phenomena together and you have a delicious pint-sized solution to food waste.

Can you tell us something about the production process of Toast Ale?

The brewing process is very simple – staying true to some of the earliest beer recipes on earth. Beer is one of the earliest known ways of preserving the calories in bread. The sugars in the carbohydrates in the baked grains are converted to simple sugars by enzymes, which ferment over time with the presence of yeast to produce alcohol.

In simple terms, we just replace a third of the barley at the beginning of the process with bread and let it do its magic.

You published a home-brew recipe so households can brew their own bread-based beers. Do you believe Do-It-Yourself is the way to go?

DIY is an important part of the story. Bread waste is so systemic in the UK – from industrial to household waste – and so much bread is never consumed.

We look to tackle problem across three tiers: by addressing the industrial waste through our core range of national beers, tackle waste at a local level through our collaboration programme (which partners local bakers and breweries), and then household waste by raising awareness of the issue. DIY home-brews are a great example of us demonstrating that the solution to these challenges can be both fun and delicious.

The solution to these challenges can be both fun and delicious.

You are donating all your profits to the charity Feedback. How does Feedback aim to reduce food waste?

Feedback works internationally to improve the environmental impact of food. They lead initiatives like Feeding the 5,000, where they cook meals for 5,000 people using quality food that would have otherwise been wasted, or The Pig Idea, where they look to encourage surplus food being fed to livestock and to change EU regulation preventing catering waste being fed to animals.

Toast Ale was setup to convert waste bread into revenues for this work: 100% of Toast Ale's distributable profits in the UK go to Feedback, and even more goes to our partner charities overseas.

What does the future hold for Toast Ale?

We will soon brew with our 1 millionth slice of bread. We want to brew with 1 million more next year, before hunting down our big hairy goal of rescuing 1 billion slices of bread.

In doing so, we want to continue to collaborate with the entire brewing industry to encourage the reintroduction of bread into the brewing process as standard, as well as raising awareness of the environmental impact of all the food that is regularly wasted.

Ultimately, our ambition is to create a circular bakery/brewery economy - not just a circular product or business.

We will soon brew with our 1 millionth slice of bread.

You're nominated for the ECO Coin award, which celebrates innovations in sustainability. How do you feel your work fits in with broader sustainability efforts?

Our circular product story looks to tell a pretty clear message: that the solution to waste can be pint-sized and delicious.

By taking the humble slice of bread and turning it into a recognisable consumer product, we are demonstrating to consumers that sustainability doesn't have to mean wholesale lifestyle changes, it can start with a couple of different choices or tweaks to kick start the process. By trying to simplify what a sustainable lifestyle looks like, we're hoping to provide consumers with the opportunity to make more sustainable choices.

Do you think that Toast Ale should win the ECO Coin Award 2018? Cast your vote by tapping the heart below!

[post_title] => Turning surplus bread into craft beer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => eco-coin-award-toast-ale [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 16:24:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 15:24:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91564 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 82179 [post_author] => 1593 [post_date] => 2018-06-26 17:41:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-26 16:41:51 [post_content] => How can we design a cryptocurrency for the better of humanity and ecology? In this last chapter of the crypto deep dive series, we will dissect two kinds of blockchain cryptocurrencies that are currently making waves on the internet and beyond. Furthermore, we explore the waves of the ECO Coin framework that intends to bring humans a democratic system - with living trees - into this sustainable, communal cryptocurrency.Blockchain technology has only been around for ten years. It was only in 2008 when Satoshi Nakamoto released the Bitcoin white paper. To put it in perspective: this means that cryptocurrency technology is about as old as the first iPhone.However, in these ten years Bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrency technologies have fundamentally changed the way in which we look at money.Traditional money is always bound to either national or supranational organs that have a rigidly structured political and legal framework. However, in the blockchain world, these legal and political frameworks are way less elaborate (or sometimes even non-existent).The sheer possibility of having money that is uncontrollable, ungovernable and often not taxable is a seismic shift in terms of monetary development. All of that has happened in the course of ten years. A promising start, leaving us wondering: what may be coming in the future?Next Nature Network is developing a new crypto currency, the ECO Coin. In our view, what’s needed for blockchain technology to be used to its full potential, is a system that stimulates sustainable and earth-friendly behaviour. That blockchain system is simply not built yet, but ECO coin is making steps towards building it.Luckily for ECO coin, we are not the only ones to pursue sustainable blockchain technology. We have peers (and potential partners) that we can learn from. People that are developing their own platform(s) in the same, bottom-up way that ECO coin is trying to do.In this final story in the crypto-deep dive series, we will explore two examples of currencies that the ECO-coin is drawing inspiration from, and we explore the framework of the soon to be used ECO coin. So let’s leave the crypto-anarchism for what it is and look at bottom-up, society-focused blockchain solutions.

Tokens: a digital representation of human data

Besides cryptocurrency money there are also (cryptographic) tokens. In this world, a world that is not focused on big-money and system-wide revolution, there are many interesting things happening that ECO coin can learn from.Cryptographic tokens are a form of digital payment currency that can resemble any real-world asset and anything that generates more data or money on behalf of the token holder. Interest or dividends earned can be tokenized and subsequently shared as well. The person holding the tokens will automatically receive all interests and dividends connected to it.So how do these tokens work on the practical level?Let’s take the idea of a token out of the abstract by analysing a project like the Dutch NestEgg.The word nest egg has the connotation of a sum of money that is saved for the future. In essence, NestEgg is a platform that aims to build sustainable energy infrastructure without direct investments from governments or real estate investors.Users put money into the platform, which NestEgg uses to build infrastructure (like for example a windmill) and in return, users get a cryptographic token which is their proof of having invested into the infrastructure. The token automatically generates dividends, meaning that the token earns the user money as long as it’s held. Users can claim through the NestEgg platform after the infrastructure project is built.NestEgg, in essence, is a way to democratise pension investment. When young people invest into it now, they have a way of saving up for their own retirement, fully outside of traditional pension funds.We should be looking to integrate these tokens for things that are not articulated within our current, dominant economic framework of fiat money. The most applicable articulation of this research, is of course, ecological value.ECO coin was majorly inspired by this approach of using digital currencies for investing into your own pension (read: the far future). It’s a subject that is so contradictory to the lightning speed developments within the current blockchain space.In a way, you can compare an investment into the ECO coin platform as an investment into the future. And even though it doesn’t return actual direct dividends or money, the soft result of an investment into ECO coin is that you make sure that the (near) future stays within reach humanities effect on climate change is brought back lots. People will also begin believing in the future again, where we can live together with both our ecosphere and technosphere in a great symbiosis.

Money: better when spent

Another inspiring example, this time in the category of money, is the FreiCoin project. This coin decays in value over time, making it more inflationary than our euro’s. The effect is that over time users can buy less for any FreiCoin that they’re holding.So why is that a good and inspiring thing?The project incorporates the concept of a demurrage fee, which in the days of physical money was a kind of service fee that you would pay to the banker stores and safeguards your gold. A service fee, if you will.In the FreiCoin project, however, demurrage fees are actively implemented to make it less attractive to hold an amount of FreiCoin for a longer period of time, and more attractive to spend your money. If you have €100,- worth in FreiCoins, those will be worth approximately $61.39 in the course of a mere 10 years. One can imagine what the FreiCoin demurrage fee would do to the capital of the world’s wealthiest people. It wouldn’t make sense anymore for them to hold on to it when the same fees would apply. As such, currencies that decay in value (currencies with a very high deflation rate) have the possibility of leveling out the economic field when they are adopted on a big scale. The world’s wealthy people would be forced to re-circulate their money into the economy and broader society in the form of investments. Those investments would benefit everyone in that sector, instead of just the capital holders.These are the kinds of solutions that are worthwhile to look at in the span of a 100 years.Therefore the ECO coin has chosen to incorporate this structural incentive of a demurrage fee to incentivize users to spend the coins at partners as quickly as possible instead of doing the #hodl that many crypto investors do.Making this technology it even more rooted in nature: the value of ECOs represent the decaying value of trees, since trees mature and die over time, too. We’ve calculated that it takes about a 100 years for a tree to die, so it should also take 100 years for an ECO coin to die, meaning that 1% will be cut off its value every year.

The framework of the ecocoin

So how are we going to use cryptocurrency technology for the better of humanity?The eco coin will be an investment in humanities future, generating ecological dividends over time. And, it’s value will decay quickly over time, incentivizing the user community to spend the coins and keep the currency vivid.Within the framework of the ECO coin, which will be alive within the blockchain world of the 100 years to come, we also aim to fundamentally change the root of blockchain technology to include humans into the equation, as well as ethics.Adding humans into the equation: the eco-inspector Any (blockchain) system that wants to sincerely be good has to ‘force’ its users to work towards the same collective goals. As of yet, this ‘working towards the same collective goals’ is simply non-existent in the many blockchain networks that are around.In other words: there’s no ethical guidance yet in whatever a blockchain can and can’t do. That’s why we are introducing the ECO Inspector: a real-life job with which you do important work for the ECO Coin network and are remunerated for your work in ECO coins.The ECO coin network can never go without its ECO inspectors. They literally keep the blockchain afloat by verifying that sustainable actions took place, introducing and training new ECO inspectors and managing the escrowed trees by confirming that these trees are still standing at the given location. In addition, giving this task to humans, instead of to computer power, may prove to make this currency less energy intensive.Democratizing to aid sustainabilityWhat’s important for the coming years of blockchain development is that ethics become a part of the conversation in the blockchain world. Whether you are using your Bitcoin to fund sustainable ideas or to fund an arms race within Africa, to the Bitcoin network: it doesn’t matter.Moreover, agency and self-regulation are a big problem in current blockchain networks as well as a big question for regulating bodies. How can you regulate/steer something that is not tied to any one location nor can be shut down?The ECO coin is making people work towards the same collective goal of doing more sustainable actions and treating the planet well. The regulating body, the ECO coin team, can only point in the direction of a solution, but it is building systems that outsource decisionmaking on the environmental questions and uncertainties towards its community of users.We will do that by creating a decentralised monetary fund where users can vote on wherever the fund’s money should go. A Decentralised Autonomous Charity, a digital agora. This means that the authority about what is and what isn’t sustainable will not be held within ECO coin as a company, but rather be collectively agreed upon by the community of users. We are working on the voting system as we speak and users will be able to vote from the app very easily.All together, eco coin team, the eco inspectors, and the voting community will work towards a system where ECO coins can only be spent on sustainable products, thereby changing our consumption habits. Therefore, a thorough dive into into the supply chain and production methods of the companies that want to partner in order to verify that they are, indeed, selling good, sustainable produce that should be exchangeable for ECO coins.Because the blockchain will be public and vendors are identified, funding bad ideas using ECO coins will be nearly impossible to do. And this is also strongly de-incentivised by the network as a whole, since ECO coins can only be spent at certified vendors.Nature is to be hard-wired into our technology On top of that, any ECO coin is not just a superficial number on a blockchain, but it stands for an actual, living tree somewhere in the world.As such, the network is literally pegged to real-world trees, who back this new cryptocurrency with something that has tangible value. The ECO coin trees are the physical representations of the digital network.With the ECO coin, a part of our ecology (trees) will be hard-wired into the technological world of the future. That is forward to Nature, pur sang.Let’s use this framework to save the future, and our earth, together.This was the last story of the crypto deep dive series, in which we immersed ourselves into the crypto world to explore the possibilities for the ECO coin. Want to learn more? Visit the ECO Coin website, where we will soon publish the technical paper. [post_title] => The future of the ECO Coin [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => future-of-the-eco-coin [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 10:48:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 09:48:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=82179 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81983 [post_author] => 1650 [post_date] => 2018-06-14 07:58:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-14 06:58:19 [post_content] => There it is. A hefty hen, with its head up high and its beak out. And a gigantic VR headset over its beady little eyes. What does this battery hen see? ‘An experience of a free life’, according to American designer Austin Stewart. Second Livestock – shown last year at the ‘Robotic Wilderness’ exhibition of the Transnatural collective – is uncomfortable to watch, but it does uncover accurately the relationship we currently have with nature. Because no, this is not an image that we associate with nature. When we think of nature, we think of a hen freely scratching around a bit of bright and unspoiled green. Not of a battery hen, let alone with a VR headset.We often have a surprisingly romantic image of nature. Surprising, because you could ask yourself where that bit of unspoiled green can be found these days. Especially in the Netherlands, it is an illusion to think that nature in its purest for can exist. ‘God created the world, with the exception of the Netherlands. That the Dutch created themselves’, as Voltaire already described it. For example, nature reserves like the Oostvaardersplassen and ‘Het Groene Hart’ (The Green Heart) were originally industrial areas before they were transformed. And in the Markermeer five islands are currently being created the size of as many as one hundred football pitches to form a nature reserve. Nature that is just as man-made as an office park, as journalist Tracy Metz puts it strikingly.However, we continue to long for nature that is untouched, a wilderness, a purity. Sweet nature where we can breathe fresh air on weekends and a wilderness made by human hands where we can get lost in an orderly fashion.Nature seems to be a given, but it is something of which various different images can exist. The image of nature that comes to the fore is something that is closely connected to – however paradoxical it may be – its counterpart: technology. Our image of nature gives insight into our relationship with technology.[caption id="attachment_81986" align="alignnone" width="640"] Franchise Freedom by Studio Drift. Photo Measure[/caption]

Our image of nature reflects our relationship with technology

Roughly fifty years ago, the prevailing image of nature was that of a production landscape. Something over which we were the undisputed ruler, that we could use and have complete control over. Technology was a reliable partner. Of course, it is something that has never been free from debate – take, for example, the introduction of the television – but at that time the debate was limited to a relatively small part of our lives.Now, technology has taken up a different, more wide-ranging place in our lives. With the smartphone, everyone always has a screen in their pocket. When you walk down the street, you let yourself be guided by GPS or an algorithm, add an Instagram filter to everything, and are constantly in a parallel world of work emails and Facebook friends or sharing in the lives of vloggers. Technology has never had such a presence as it does today.This makes us increasingly aware of how much we are controlled by this technology. The smartphone and apps in particular, are shown to be designed in such a way that they try to capture our attention for as long as possible. They do this by playing to all manner of psychological vulnerabilities, which – ironically – are ingrained in human nature. For example, the round icon that notifies you of an incoming email or a missed call, and was initially green, has proven to be impossible for people to ignore now that it’s red.We live in a technological environment in which we feel more and more like puppets controlled by our smartphones, and so – indirectly – by the large tech companies. And on the horizon, an image looms of technology that is becoming even more powerful. Take, for example, robots that can open doors autonomously and algorithms that know us better than we know ourselves. During Dutch Design Week, VPRO Medialab presented the ‘Aura’ installation by Studio Nick Verstand at the ‘We know how you feel’ exhibition. This work measures the emotions of participants using three bio-sensors – a heartbeat, a brainwave, and a skin conductance sensor. Each emotion is made visible with colourful beams of light, and each colour corresponds to a specific emotion. Red beams of light, for example, could betray your nervous and tense feelings to the other visitors. This exposes your invisible inner emotional life for everyone to see.The installation was not only fascinating and poetic, but also aroused vulnerability. Our inner emotional life has long been something with which we humans set ourselves apart from animals, but also, in particular, from machines. Who are we as humans if machines can monitor or even control our emotions? And, as philosopher Alain de Botton says, humans in general are none too emotionally intelligent. We often make bad judgements and decisions relating to our emotions. Not much is needed for a machine to know us better than we know ourselves when it comes to our emotional life.Humankind’s position – for centuries unshakeable – is shifting. Writers like Yuval Harari and Luciano Floridi argue that we will lose our infallible position as rulers of the universe because of technology that operates more and more independently. We are moving towards a world in which humans and machines coexist. Our technological environment is taking on a grandeur that cannot be controlled, comparable to – how ironic – the role that nature has for centuries played for humankind.It is unsurprising that a countermovement is growing against the presence of technology in our lives. Detox is the key word in this context. People try to clamp down on moments in which you can use your smartphone. Dinner with the family without smartphones, so you can have real conversations again. Working without Internet, so you can be really productive again. Going on holiday without your phone, so you can really be in the moment again. A digital detox, so you can return to that bit of pure and unspoiled human being.It seems our search for an authentic nature experience is very logical. An image of pure, unspoiled nature is an image that can serve as an pardon. A license to feel a bit better when returning to our day-to-day environment that consists mainly of bricks and bits and feels increasingly lifeless.[caption id="attachment_81987" align="alignnone" width="640"] Chickens in VR, Second Livestock by Austin Stewart[/caption]

Nature according to human standards

That pardon may be logical, but it’s such a shame, it might be a sin. Because we miss so much when we get stuck in this romantic image of nature. In a time in which technology impacts so much – humans and their natural environment – it is of the greatest important to have an ongoing dialogue. It is a given what we are shifting to a new natural environment in which nature and technology will be more and more intertwined. And it is also a fact that that environment will ask us questions about what nature really is, or what a human being is.That’s not a bad thing. It gives us the resources to create nature according to human standards. To discover what we’re really searching for when we delve deep into nature for a detox. What are we looking for? What does that unspoiled bit of nature and, what’s more, that bit of unspoiled human being stand for? Simply lapsing into a dogma of detoxing and an unrealistic image of nature is not something on which you can build a solid foundation for a relationship with yourself and your environment.So it’s time to move onward, and to accept that we find ourselves in a ‘next nature’. A nature that just might derive its definition from everything that falls outside of human control. So that cultivated tomatoes or a hypoallergenic cat (there really is such a thing) will more likely fall into the culture category, while a computer virus or a file can be considered a natural phenomenon.And perhaps we will find, for example, that we are also able to discover the overwhelmingly majestic beauty, the sublime with which the 18th-century Romantics sang the praises of nature, in technological nature. Consider, for example, the art work FRANCHISE FREEDOM – a flying sculpture by Studio Drift in collaboration with BMW, in which three hundred luminous drones fly through the sky like a swarm of starlings. Watching the performance you realise that the magic and the beauty of the synchronised movements of a group of birds can also be created by technology.[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/253934552[/vimeo]But the most important reason to change our perspective on nature, is that it is not helpful to nature itself. For example, calculating the value of nature may feel cold and even improper, but, at the same time, it can help provide us with a tool against climate change. Our ECO coin is a first attempt to express ecological value in economic terms. How much is the Amazon rainforest worth? How much would you pay a farmer not to cut down a tree, but to leave it standing? This is extremely difficult to determine, but the current division between the economic system and our ecology is also an important reason behind why climate problems are an issue in the first place.And so, a battery hen with a VR headset might be something that feels unnatural according to traditional standards, but it might be something that fits within a new concept of nature according to human standards.This essay was published in the magazine The Dots no.15 with the theme Human Nature, designing the equilibrium and distributed during the Milan Design Week 2018. [post_title] => Getting rid of that bit of unspoiled green [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => getting-rid-of-that-bit-of-unspoiled-green [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-21 19:35:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-21 18:35:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81983 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81970 [post_author] => 1593 [post_date] => 2018-06-11 14:00:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-11 13:00:45 [post_content] => In Ancient Greece the people were part of a direct-democracy, this means that they would directly vote for policies and laws. Nowadays, it seems as though this horizontal approach to governance of a community is desired again: The crypto world has developed a specific platform to enable direct democracies to their users; the Decentralized Autonomous Organisations (DAO’s). What could these DAO’s mean for the ECO Coin? May these revive the ancient buzzing agora, this time in the digital sphere?

Inspired by Athens' ancient direct democracy

Back in the ancient city-state of Athens, citizens would roam its “Agora” - today known as a marketplace - to exchange goods and political ideas. Ancient Athens had what can be best described as a direct democracy: People voted directly on new policies, and there weren’t many elected politicians. Via a rotational model, 500 men were randomly chosen from the pool of citizens to think of new laws and change the old ones. Today, thousands of years later, most of our societies within nation-states have developed representative democracies where citizens elect officials who, in turn, make new laws and re-evaluate old ones on behalf of the country. The early beginnings of this current model of representative democracy is largely attributed to the direct democracy of ancient Athens. But, this representative democracy is not a utopia for all organisations. Many communities that are either smaller or more spread out than a nation-state are looking for ways to more efficiently and transparently manage their decision-making processes. For instance, corporations that are looking at ways to implement more flattened organisational structures or to simply cut out the managerial levels of their businesses in order to save money, increase accountability and develop more efficiency. For these smaller or widely spread communities, corporations and organisations, the Agora once again serves as an example to implement more direct democratic structures.

Voting in the crypto world: Decentralized autonomous organizations

One place where this direct democracy may find its medium is in the crypto-world. The Ethereum network has created a programmable voting structure for this process, which they call a Decentralized Autonomous Organization (DAO). These are in essence small pieces of code that are deployed on a blockchain, meaning that they are programmed to behave in certain ways without exceptions. DAO’s can have various ways of functioning, but they all require a user to deposit a given amount of their coins into the DAO. This gives the user a vote within the organisation. The most well-known example of a functioning DAO is located within the DASH (short for Digital Cash) network. It’s a cryptocurrency mostly being used in Asia with a treasury model where users offer a collateral of 1000 DASH (at the time of writing worth around $400k) to be a voting actor within the network. The 1000 DASH is being used as a deposit to ensure the coin holders honour their commitment to keeping the masternodes up and to interact with the proposals. With their 1000 DASH, they set up what’s called a ‘masternode’: an elaborate cryptocurrency wallet that comes with a piece of software and allows them to vote on new proposals. These proposals include anything from developer wages to marketing efforts to the development of new products. Proposals can be submitted by users and once a proposal reaches its threshold of votes, the code executes in such a way that the proposing party receives, for example, the funds that they made a proposal for. In this new framework, the beautiful Agora of Athens is replaced with a digital interface: all voting is done online.In the case of ECO Coin, our currency to connect economy and ecology, the proposals being submitted could include the funding of sustainable initiatives or could even propose to create renewable energy infrastructure to the benefit of the ECO Coin network.

Envisioning a DAO voting world

Naturally, the logic of a DAO can go far beyond the allocation of funds. For instance, in the work field, employees can vote on each other’s promotions.In the context of music festivals a DAO could set out a question for its users to answer, for example: What do you deem to have contributed most towards reducing this festivals ecological footprint? The community could then answer: “amount of plastic cups returned”. After the vote has been done, the (group of) users that returned the most cups could have their NFC bracelets updated with a certain amount of free drinks. Perhaps they can get access to special areas at the festival where other visitors can’t visit. The more interwoven and sensor-connected our future environment becomes, the more the potential of such a DAO structure can be explored. The best part is, there is not a single employee needed to ensure this operation continues. The only requirement is that the network has enough active participants.Within the context of the ECO Coin, a DAO can be an important tool to leverage the knowledge of the user-community and trigger user interaction. Implementing a DAO structure would mean that users actually own a part of the network, since they have all the power to decide on any important decisions to be made. It would herald, you guessed it, a return of the Athenian Agora in a digital form, within which important dialogue takes place around what sustainability exactly is.

Decentralized organisations: No one leads, everyone does

Apart from the communal benefits that the DAO structure has, a DAO also ensures that there is not a single point of failure. The team behind the ECO Coin does not maintain the network in any way (just like any other blockchain network), as it is maintained by miners, stakers and masternodes - therefore you could say that it is partly owned by these people. Because the members are voting directly on proposals, the DASH is functioning as a ‘headless’ organisation in a way. In most traditional organizations, most decision making is the CEO’s job. In this new DAO framework, the code is being trusted to ensure these decisions are taken and the network is being asked for input on making them. This was hard to realise before DAO’s came about, since it would mean that organisations had to rely on the employees themselves to make and arrange the moments of decision-making, next to their usual workload.The software being used to run the masternodes is spread out over all the different participants. That’s what the Decentralized part stands for: ECO Coin would not be running more than just one of the masternodes themselves, and the one they might run would not differ at all from the one another user would set up.Even if the one node that the ECO Coin maintains fails for whatever reason, the rest of the network will continue to run, since all other actors on the network run the exact same software and can therefore guarantee a continued and smooth operation. This is a major benefit of any decentralized application and it takes away some important responsibilities from the ECO Coin team, meaning they can fully focus on the development of new functionalities on the platform and engaging more people in the discussion taking place around sustainability and ecological action.To sum up, DAO’s could provide the ECO Coin and other initiatives with a platform for users to engage in an important discussion and put these points of debate into actual policy through the voting on proposals: A place where ideas are openly discussed and voted on, that sounds a lot like the Agora of ancient Athens, doesn’t it? [post_title] => The return of direct democracy: Introducing a digital agora to the crypto-world [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => digital-agora-crypto-world [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-15 07:52:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-15 06:52:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81970 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81454 [post_author] => 1593 [post_date] => 2018-04-25 10:00:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-25 09:00:27 [post_content] => The connection we share through the Internet has laid the foundation for a whole new digital infrastructure, in which blockchain technology is heralded by many believers for being the future of both our money and our internet infrastructure. However, the future of this technology and its applicability is not so certain as many blockchain evangelists will have you believe. This makes us wonder, how exactly are we going to build our collective and digital future? Can we make it less energy intensive, and bring back the human touch?When the first version of the Internet came about, people had to dial-up over phone lines using a modem to connect it to the network. You paid by the minute, the connection dropped every now and then, and in general, it wasn’t a very nice experience.We may be safe to say that, the blockchain is currently still in its dial-up phase: it's clunky, often not very user-friendly, and probably only being used by some technical cousin of yours.This leaves us with the opportunity to develop this new infrastructure of technologies. There are many projects that aim to push the blockchain further - which we will refer to as ‘infrastructure projects’. These are projects that aim to build the interconnected infrastructure of tomorrow, and with that, make the technology accessible to a larger audience. In the near future, we may be living in co-existence with these systems.Bitcoin with its Proof of Work blockchain (Proof of Work refers to cryptographically signing transactions together in tree-like structures) was only the first generation (or iteration) of this important tool. Ethereum (with its “smart contracts”) heralded the 2nd generation, and now we are looking at a 3rd generation, the future of blockchain tools. If we compare this to our internet-metaphor, we could see this generation as the ‘Wi-Fi routers among blockchains’.Looking at the current environment, though, it’s sometimes hard to envision this 3rd generation of future infrastructure, because it is yet to be built and mapped out in concrete terms. We can, however, explore a direction the ECO-coin is hoping this future of money may take. Namely, to minimize the energy usage of this money-system, and to ensure a human inclusion in this future technology.

Towards a lesser energy-intensive coin

In all this talk of the ‘technology of tomorrow’, sustainability consistently flies under the radar. The world genuinely needs ecological technologies, and it definitely needs ecological cryptocurrency technologies. Next Nature Network has asked itself the question: can we build a coin that is ecological by design?A promising glimpse of this future, may come from the proposed IOTA token, which is an example of such a 3rd generation blockchain. IOTA offers an important inspiration to the ECO Coin project, because it is thinking thoroughly about the energy usage of blockchains.IOTA is a token that will be distributed within all the Internet of Things (IoT) devices that will probably be added to our homes in the coming years. The IOTA token would make it possible for IoT machines to award each other for the data that they generate. So the thermostat could award the security camera for registering that one of the house owners walks into the house.This token has yet to prove itself worthy. But this doesn’t mean the platform or token is worthless. We may derive a valuable goal and means from it.The IOTA token, if it succeeds, is able to use less energy and therefore leverage different infrastructure technology than Bitcoin and Ethereum miners are able to. Small computers within our IoT sensors could potentially keep the IOTA ‘blockchain’ (which is actually not a blockchain) afloat and running, whereas Ethereum and Bitcoin mining can only be done with expensive, dedicated mining computers that can’t be used to do anything else than mine cryptocurrency.There aren’t many ways to connect a product to a blockchain yet., The most common approach to use the blockchain is the earlier mentioned Proof of Work. The most important feature of this way of confirming transactions is that every historical transaction ever done is recalculated within every new transaction that is made. This process is there to prevents corrupt money transfers. However, it is very power-intensive, as you need masses of calculating power to recalculate every single transaction every single time.Therefore, the IOTA protocol is not only a hype: it can really solve a very persistent problem in the blockchain space; that of energy usage.We think there is a need for more players in this emerging market of energy efficient blockchain services, so that these projects together can inform us about a safe blockchain-connected future that is also responsible towards our living environment.

Let’s put humans back into the equation

Talking about infrastructure projects, Next Nature Network has set up the ECO Coin project as a way to explore a social confirmation tool as an alternative for power-intensive Proof of Work systems. The ECO Coin proposes to include human 'checks' within a blockchain network. This would save power on the one hand, and invite users to interact with the technology on the other hand.In this new framework, questions can be set out for the network of computers to solve, just like within a Proof of Work blockchain network. In addition, humans will also have to visually confirm and check a transaction off before any transaction can go through on the blockchain. Once the transactions goes through, it will still be cryptographically signed and thus stored.With this human-addition, the ECO Coin envisions a new network role of ECO Inspector, which means that there are certified human inspectors that confirm sustainable actions, procedures and transactions, thereby leveraging the data that the network generates and adding failsafes so that there is a double protection against bad actors.The ECO Inspector will have a symbiotic relationship with the technological platform: in dialogue with the ECO Coin app, they will confirm and reward ecologically sound behaviour. The one can never go without the other.So far, there are no systems combining cryptocurrency technologies with active user rewards on the root level of the technology. Because miners (Proof of Work blockchain computers) will be non-existent in the ECO Coin network, the mining fees that incentivise Bitcoin mining computers and their owners to continue their work can go to these ECO inspectors, a role that incentivises users to be active participants in the network and which gives them agency over the network itself. [post_title] => The future infrastructure of the blockchain might be green and humane [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-future-blockchain [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-25 14:36:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-25 13:36:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81454 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81407 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-04-22 10:00:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-22 09:00:19 [post_content] => Today is Earth Day! This means that we think about the relationship between man, nature and technology, as technology is becoming a nature of its own. Acknowledged in 192 countries, Earth Day is among the most widely celebrated eco-events across the world. Today it focuses on creating awareness about our planet and demonstrating support for environmental protection.Now, what have you done to protect the environment? Took the bike to work last week? Had a meat-free lunch? Tell us on Twitter using #ecocoin or drop us a line in the comments below, and you might earn your very first ECO Coin in return!The dream of an ECO currency emerged at the 2009 Paralelo Conference in Brazil. This event brought together artists and designers from Brazil, the Netherlands, and the UK, with the aim to explore ways in which intercultural and interdisciplinary collaborations could enable research and new insights into local ecological problems. And thus, the ECO Coin was born.The ECO Coin project was researched in the Next Nature Lab at the Eindhoven University of Technology in 2010, after which a proposal was born for a collaborative platform to disctribute the ECOs among people who contribute to a better environment. The vision of such an ECO Coin was first published in our Next Nature Book in 2012.In 2015, we were invited to speak at a TEDx event. This is where things really took off! In that same year, we handed our very first ECO Coin Award to Yoyo Yogasmana for his work in Indonesia to preserve more than 130 existing rice varieties without any use of insecticides and transfer his knowledge to the digital domain. And we have been handing out medals ever since!Next, we wanted to test the currency in a community. Thousands of people were able to earn and spend ECOs at festivals and events in 2017. And now, we want to scale the currency with a revolutionary new technology: The blockchain. This is the technology that enables a cryptocurrency like the ECO Coin to function and make a positive contribution to balance ecology and economy, now and in the future.At birth, every cryptocurrency publishes their so-called "whitepaper": A vision of what their coin can do. In this file you will find how we link our economy and ecology through backing every ECO coin with trees. The paper also describes the ECO Coin as a living coin: A currency that is born, lives and decays over time.Want to read more about the ECO Coin? We are happy to share with you our very first ECO Coin whitepaper. In this paper, you can read all about the future of the ECO Coin, our currency to reward sustainable actions. 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Each year we celebrate ecological heroes as part of our ECO Coin Award and this year is no different. Have you seen an inspiring person who is making the world a more sustainable place? Let us know!

Why an ECO Coin (Award?)

Consider this: When you cut a tree and sell the wood, you will earn money. When you plant a tree, you are creating value, but you won’t get paid. In short, our ecology and economy are out of balance. That's why we launched the ECO Coin, an alternative currency to express environmental value. This is how we connect economy and ecology. Learn more about the ECO Coin.

The ECO Coin Award then, honors outstanding ecological heroes of all kinds. It seeks to inspire others by showcasing the projects that work with nature and technology in innovative ways.

What are you looking for in a winner?

We search for people working on projects that are community driven, use nature and technology in an innovative way, and share their knowledge with others. It could be someone working on a new sustainable energy source, a person developing a greener transportation system or somebody who seeks to clean polluted air. There's just one rule: It should be a person (so Burger King introducing vegan burgers does not apply, sorry).

Who are the previous winners of the ECO Coin Award?

In 2015, we handed out our first ECO Coin award to Yoyo Yogasamana for his digitalization of sustainable knowledge to preserve more than 130 existing rice varieties without any use of insecticides. In 2016 the award was given to Dave Hakkens for his ambitious open source precious plastics recycling machine. In 2017, Sandra Rey won the award for her work in the field of bioluminescence. In 2018, we handed the award to Elzelinde Doleweerd for utilizing the technology of 3D printing to upcycle food waste into edible products.

How to nominate someone today?

That's easy, simply head to ecocoin.com and share your nomination (and yes, you can nominate yourself). You can also nominate someone by commenting on this story below.

🏁 Deadline for submissions: 1 December 2019.

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