47 results for “Economology”

Slowing down to start up: Here’s the first chapter of our crypto deep dive series

Koen Blezer
March 28th 2018

It takes years to design a new banknote, having hundreds of people working on every little detail, all done under the watchful eye of governments and professionals. However today, blockchain technology allows anyone to create and launch their own digital cryptocurrency in less than a minute with only a few clicks. What does this all mean? In this Deep Dive series, we take a closer look at some of these new coins, diving into the technology that underpins them, and …

The Story of Money: Bits

NextNature.net
January 10th 2018
The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. The final episode: bits.

The Story of Money: Plastic

NextNature.net
January 4th 2018
The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. This episode: plastic.

The Story of Money: Paper

NextNature.net
December 28th 2017
The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. This episode: paper.

The Story of Money: Gold

NextNature.net
December 21st 2017
The story of money, an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. This episode: gold.

The Story of Money: Livestock

NextNature.net
December 7th 2017
The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age - from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining.

In Conversation with Yoyo Yogasmana, Winner of the First ECO Coin Award

Ruben Baart
April 9th 2017
Read our conversation with the ECO Coin Award Winner of 2015: Yoyo Yogasmana.

Plastic Cup Fields Are Not Forever

Van Mensvoort
August 24th 2016
Exploring ECO coin opportunities at Lowlands Festival. One coin for every plastic cup! A perfect local community to prototype the concept.

Rating the Reputation Economy

Lewis Just
May 17th 2016
Our online reputation is becoming a valuable currency that is hard to earn and easy to lose.

A Cryptocurrency Helping to Cure Cancer

Lewis Just
May 4th 2016
Part two of a ten part series exploring the design of an invisible technology: money.
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Economy is ecology

We are living in a world of accelerating change: Ecologies are being put to waste while new ones are being formed at any given moment, anywhere in the world. This extreme throughput of ecologies is surely also the case in our financial world. As soon as a new ecology emerges (like the sharing economy), the financial world rushes in to create an economy for it.Such a market is made from trade and conversions between shares, stocks or equities: whatever product is needed to plug it into our complex economic process. But the rules of this process remain unclear. They surely differ from the strict programming rules behind an app or website in the way that, even though we can create these markets, we never know how they will behave or what their value will be in the future. It’s an ecology of itself, something worth studying in order to learn from its behaviour.With the ECO Coin, we are aiming to create an ecological economy: an economy that is directly connected to the global, ecological sphere. To do so, we make use of cryptocurrency- and blockchain technology, and in this story, we will introduce you to the dynamics and systems that continuously feed the development of this ecological economy platform we’re currently building.Cryptocurrencies are constantly 'moving'; either up, down or sideways. And millions of dollars are flying across blockchains, faster than the speed of light. As a result, shares are being dropped for this hot new investment alternative, and money is lost in this process - hitting the people hardest who are struggling to see the cryptocurrency market for what it is: highly speculative.To that end, it is right to assume that a ‘cryptocurrency trader’ is one of the new jobs of the future, perhaps it’s as normal as being a stock trader is today.

Have you seen the latest thing in the cryptocurrency world?

No you probably haven’t. CoinMarketCap (an industry-standard listing service for cryptocurrencies) has added 58 new cryptos in the past 28 days. That’s 2 per day!By the time you are reading this, chances are that 10 new ICO’s (Initial Coin Offerings) have been launched and five crypto companies have gone bankrupt.But there are also currencies and platforms that choose a different direction. They function more like incentive structures for ‘good’ behaviour. In these, the token (a word used synonymously with the words cryptocurrency and coin) doesn’t necessarily hold any economic value, but more so signifies certain wanted behaviour, like ecological behavior.When such a platform goes bust, it’s simply a failed iteration on how to digitise socially responsible behaviour.Users and speculators often regard these incentive-based coins as being ‘the new Bitcoin’, and see dollar signs when they start using them. This is something specific to the cryptocurrency market: if there’s liquidity (which in this case directly assumes socially responsible behaviour) then there must surely be something backing that coin, and it’s a solid reason to invest.The gold standard backed our financial system in the past. But we’re long past that now. The crypto avant-garde roaming the web right now is eagerly searching for the next, big asset-backed coin that they can invest into. Whether its backed by something or not.

A token for everything

While there are a lot of great use cases out there in crypto-land, it’s hard to see the actual implementation of these in day-to-day life. Cryptographic tokens can resemble voting ballots, discounts or even bought products. But as of yet, there are no tokens yet that are as normal as paying with good ol' paper money.Moving beyond blockchain technology, programmers have recently tried to crack a use case for the IOTA token (a token that will supposedly empower the Internet-of-Things revolution), but didn't succeed to find one. This shows us that a lot of conceptually valuable tokens are not being used for anything yet. At current, the IOTA token is still unusable: a speculative coin that is being bought with the assumption that its value will rise over time.Perhaps it's good that cryptocurrencies have not penetrated everything yet, this gives us some time to reflect upon its cause. The cryptocurrency world is only 10 years young and we shouldn’t just throw away thousands of years of economic history.

A new financial elite

Currently there's a pool of young (and rich) programmers that now make up the new financial elite, because this group bought into Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies very early on in the process.You could say that this new financial elite is one of our Next Natures: A new financial elite, or the crypto investors and programmers that make up most of this sector, create autonomous systems as a way of providing sustenance (income) to themselves. Instead of dialing into existing structures, they continually create new ones and find a place within that new framework.An important distinction, of course, being that they are not in control of these systems but merely the architects of them, where in the traditional financial world, the ‘quants’ or architects do have the possibility to significantly control the networks they manage, because they program within the same network. That is why cryptocurrencies are ‘moving’ so fast now.

Crypto markets: What’s the silver lining?

Blockchain is still on a level where my grandfather is unable to pay for anything with crypto, and 'day-traders' who are investing in cryptocurrencies are losing money on a daily basis.In fact, only a small percentage of them are able to make a living off of their bets, but are far removed from how the act of trading in stocks and exchanges has developed in the ‘regular’ financial world.In case you are interested in cryptocurrencies after reading this article, but are also confused by the sheer speed of its development, then there’s only a few things that you need to do: invest as little as you can, don’t be afraid of losing it, take it easy, approach markets safely and most important of all: sit back and watch.Crypto will be around long enough for you to pick the fruits of its development. So until then, learn as much as you can, do your own research and talk to as many different people as possible.The technology behind any cryptocurrency (the blockchain) is revolutionary. It can literally connect citizens together as a people, regardless of nationality, social class or political inclination. That is beautiful dream that ECO Coin is happy to keep alive and a dream we will be talking about a lot in the coming months.Perhaps what the world of cryptocurrency needs is to pick up a slower pace. This gives us some time to reflect upon its past 10 years, and think about what's possible in the next 100 years. [post_title] => Slowing down to start up: Here's the first chapter of our crypto deep dive series [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => deep-dive-series-speed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-17 11:38:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-17 10:38:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81165 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79824 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-01-10 10:42:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-10 09:42:20 [post_content] => They say that money makes the world go round. But how does it work, and how has it changed over time? While developing the ECO Coin, we’ve been thinking a great deal of money, past and present. From the origins of civilization up to present day, economy has gone through countless shakeups, and yet we tend to take our current way of thinking about money for granted. Welcome to the sixth and final part of The Story of Money: Bits.Some might have thought that the credit card represented the pinnacle of abstraction for money, a handful of plastic that could represent almost any amount of money. But in recent years, possibilities have expanded with the introduction of digital cash - money taking the form of bits and bytes. With the rise of the Internet, an increasing number of transactions were already taking place online, through banks own web services and independent sites like PayPal. The next big breakthrough was Bitcoin.Bitcoin was first released to the world in 2009 by the mysterious Satoshi Nakamoto. Bitcoin is a form of digital currency, created and held electronically. No bank or government controls or backs the currency making it a peer to peer, decentralised currency. The currency is secured by people all over the world through a process called mining. Mining is essentially using computers to solve hard mathematical problems that help secure the Bitcoin network. This mining wastes a lot of energy.It’s the first example of a growing category of money known as cryptocurrency. Bitcoin runs on a blockchain which you can think of as a ledger or spreadsheet that everyone can see but once data has been added to the spreadsheet it can never be changed. This blockchain technology can be used not only for recording money transactions but for recording any information. Bitcoin has many benefits but it is still finding its purpose in the world. Currently most people who buy Bitcoins do so for speculative reasons (i.e. they think it will have more value tomorrow). The blockchain technology and cryptographic models are a huge leap forward for money but they are yet to be fully explored, especially from a sustainable perspective.The ECO Coin, a project initiated by Next Nature Network, intends to harness this technology to help create a more sustainable future. The age of bits is also an age of environmental precarity. We’ve seen that money can have countless different relationships with the world around it. It can incentivize certain actions over others, and even determine our way of living. Yet we are often careless about what kind of actions we are encouraging.So how does it work? The ECO Coin is a currency from planet Earth which rewards people for their environmentally good actions. It’s not a worldwide cryptocurrency yet, but it has already been trailed at living labs in The Netherlands letting over 50.000 people earn and spend ECO coins. Cycled to work instead of driving? Ate a meat-free lunch? Remembered to turn the lights off? You can earn ECO Coins. And the ECO Coin is intended to be spent on products and services which also emphasize sustainability. The idea is to create a positive feedback loop with the end goal of balancing our economy and our ecology.And that's a wrap! Want to read the entire series in full? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The Story of Money: Bits [post_excerpt] => The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. The final episode: bits. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => story-of-money-bits [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-15 10:30:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-15 09:30:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79824/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79318 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-01-04 10:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-04 09:00:22 [post_content] => They say that money makes the world go round. But how does it work, and how has it changed over time? While developing the ECO Coin, we’ve been thinking a great deal of money, past and present. From the origins of civilization up to present day, economy has gone through countless shakeups, and yet we tend to take our current way of thinking about money for granted. Welcome to the fifth part of The Story of Money: Plastic.The era of plastic money is also the era of credit. Like paper money, the idea of a credit card begins with a promise. In this case, the promise is not “we owe you”, but “we trust you to pay us back, even if you have no real money to pay with right now”. The idea of credit cards originated with individual businesses offering it to loyal customers. Think of a regular at the local bar who maintains a tab so that he can always get a drink, even when he has no cash on hand.The first credit cards were not plastic - nor were they even cards. Businesses began by handing out coins or metal plates as symbols of credits. Eventually it was found more practical to start handing out paper cards. But as time went on, busy customers who frequented a large selection of shops found themselves carrying around an inordinate amount of these cards.One of the first companies to try to solve this inconvenience, in 1950, was the Diners Club. This service allowed diners at a selection of New York restaurants to pay by credit, on the condition that the debt was paid off at the end of each month. Eight years later, the Bank of America took the next step: a credit card that did not require the consumer to pay at the end of each month. This was the enterprise that eventually became Visa.The idea of credit was shifting from a privileged trust relationship between individuals, to a more abstract category. Now, people could essentially pull money out of thin air, but careless spenders were and are still often saddled with considerable debt. Almost everyone now carries a little plastic card that represents an indefinite amount of money - but the situation is precarious. Where does money go next?Next week: BitsPART 1 LivestockPART 2 ShellsPART 3 Gold, PART 3: Paper_______________________Do you want to stay up to date about the ECO Coin and latest next nature news? Join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The Story of Money: Plastic [post_excerpt] => The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. This episode: plastic. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => story-of-money-plastic [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-10 10:42:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-10 09:42:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79318/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79313 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-12-28 10:00:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-28 09:00:03 [post_content] => They say that money makes the world go round. But how does it work, and how has it changed over time? While developing the ECO Coin, we've been thinking a great deal of money, past and present. From the origins of civilization up to present day, economy has gone through countless shakeups, and yet we tend to take our current way of thinking about money for granted. Welcome to the fourth part of The Story of Money: Paper.When paper money was first introduced in China, it was conceptualized quite differently from its modern incarnation. Like gold coins, paper bank notes have a prehistory. Bank notes had existed much earlier, but were made of leather. The advent of block printing opened up the possibility of paper money.Merchants around this time were struggling to transport metal money across long distances, owing to its weight. Paper money was first introduced as a sort of IOU; rather than transporting metal currency themselves, merchants could bring a paper certificate officially granting ownership to whomever they were trading with. Eventually, the idea caught on that as long as everyone recognized the legitimacy of paper currency, there was no need for it to be tied to precious metals at all. This had the added benefit of freeing up iron and copper for more practical uses.This raises a question: where did the legitimacy of this money come from? We have seen how the UK and other nations tried for some time to tie their money to a gold standard. But outside of this era, the value of paper money is simply something that is declared by the issuing government. Paper money works not because of any innate preciousness, but because governments, banks and businesses promise to accept it.This requires a certain level of trust, and at various times in history governments have taken harsh action against counterfeiters. The Chinese at one time cut out the hearts of criminals caught faking the Emperor’s currency, and the British in 1817 hanged 313 people for producing or using phony bank notes. Flooding an enemy nation’s economy with fake money is even a well-known tactic in war.Today, paper money is steadily being supplanted by other forms of currency - but for now, it is very much still with us.Next week: PlasticPART 1 LivestockPART 2 Shells, PART 3 Gold_______________________Do you want to stay up to date about the ECO Coin and latest next nature news? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The Story of Money: Paper [post_excerpt] => The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. This episode: paper. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => story-of-money-paper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-02 10:26:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-02 09:26:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79313/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79307 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-12-21 10:00:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-21 09:00:18 [post_content] => They say that money makes the world go round. But how does it work, and how has it changed over time? While developing the ECO Coin, we’ve been thinking a great deal of money, past and present. From the origins of civilization up to present day, economy has gone through countless shakeups, and yet we tend to take our current way of thinking about money for granted. Welcome to the third part of The Story of Money: Gold.No doubt you’ve heard of the gold standard, the monetary system in which value was measured against gold. But where does this reliance on gold come from? The first coins, used in China, were in fact made of bronze. They were originally not round but modelled after shells, knives, spades and other recognizable objects. Only later they were made circular - and then with a hole in the middle so that they could be worn on a necklace.But bronze was a common material, and elsewhere in the world people felt the need to make their money out of something more precious. This is where gold, along with silver and other precious metals, comes in. Gold began to be used for the making of coins, and with its natural scarcity, governments did not have to fear inflation from its being too common.The use of gold as an official standard for all currency, however, comes later. After the colonization of the new world, European settlers discovered that there was a great deal more gold to be found in the Americas than they had access to at home. The British led the way in imposing a gold standard whereby the nation’s economic life rested on its gold reserve as a standard of measurement. Other countries, including France, Germany and the USA, followed suit.However, as economies declined during the First World War and the Great Depression, living up to this standard became increasingly difficult. The gold standard was initially modified and eventually removed in all countries where it had previously been effective. And though some still advocate for a return to this gold standard, the general economic consensus is that such a return would not bring any real benefits. The era of gold seems to be over for good.Next week: PaperPART 1 LivestockPART 2 Shells_______________________Do you want to stay up to date about the ECO Coin and latest news? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The Story of Money: Gold [post_excerpt] => The story of money, an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age, from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. This episode: gold. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => story-of-money-gold [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-25 22:45:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-25 21:45:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79307/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79003 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-12-07 09:20:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-07 08:20:11 [post_content] => They say that money makes the world go round. But how does it work, and how has it changed over time? While developing the ECO Coin, we’ve been thinking a great deal of money, past and present. From the origins of civilization up to present day, economy has gone through countless shakeups, and yet we tend to take our current way of thinking about money for granted.So, we’ve put together the story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age - from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. The series consists of six parts, each one exploring a different age: livestock, cowry shells, gold, paper, plastic and bits.Way back before the dawn of civilization, our prehistoric ancestors worked together in tribes, hunting collectively and sharing the spoils amongst themselves. The story of money starts when this way of life began to seem inadequate. Relying on your own labor was all well and good, but what if you needed something neither you nor your clan could get their hands on?This was where barter came in. Barter transactions were based on trust. You knew that when you gave your neighbor a piece of meat, you would eventually get something in return. As this practice became increasingly common, people started to specialize. Instead of trying to provide for themselves directly, someone would specialize, for instance, in grain farming. They could keep some grain for themselves and trade the rest away for whatever else they needed.The problem was that the barter system relied on a “coincidence of wants” - that is, for grain to be traded for shoes, we need one person who has grain and wants shoes, and another who has shoes and wants grain. When the shoemaker has plenty of grain already, suddenly the unfortunate farmer has nothing to offer him. What these communities needed was a universal converter that could act as the medium for trading any product or service for any other.In short, they needed a currency. And for these early agricultural societies, the first logical choice was livestock. Cattle were the fuel on which society ran. They were durable, had practical uses, and were not so common as to be valueless. And livestock came in different sizes. One cow might be worth two goats, or perhaps five chickens. With this odd, unwieldy currency, the story of money begins.Next week: Shells_______________________Do you want to stay up to date about the ECO Coin and latest next nature news? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The Story of Money: Livestock [post_excerpt] => The story of money: an accessible roadmap from prehistory to digital age - from cows to credit, from gold mining to bitcoin mining. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => story-of-money-livestock [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-11 09:36:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-11 08:36:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79003/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72308 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-04-09 12:15:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-09 11:15:20 [post_content] => In 2015 we handed our first ECO Coin Award to Age of Wonderland fellow Yoyo Yogasmana for his work in Indonesia to preserve more than 130 existing rice varieties without any use of insecticides and transfer his knowledge to the digital domain. Two years have passed, reason enough to catch up with Yogasmana and discuss the Kasepuhan community, global food networks and winning the ECO Coin Award.In his acceptance speech on the occasion of the award, Yoyo modestly referred to the Ciptagelar Kasepuhan community by thanking them for their generous contribution to the project. “The community was very pleased to receive the Award” Yoyo says. “This was an important token of appreciation that presented our work to a large audience around the world. Our community performs a far-reaching body of work to conserve nature and culture, and strives to balance and harmonize our relationship with all living creatures”.
It is important to transmit nature, culture and traditions to successive generations
The Kasepuhan community is a traditional Sundanese community that counts around 5.300 people living in the foggy mountains of West Java, Indonesia. Its name comes from the Sundanese word sepuh, which means "old" and refers to a way of living based on ancestral traditions. Such traditions laid the foundation of the local community, whose main subsistence depends on the cultivation of rice.[caption id="attachment_72963" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Ciptagelar village view[/caption][caption id="attachment_72961" align="aligncenter" width="640"] The village is 1400m above sea level; it is always surrounded by mist.[/caption]In 2015 Yoyo was among the Age of Wonderland fellows, that year they addressed the complex issues ingrained in our global food system together with the local community of Eindhoven. “What we did was introduce our local wisdom and ancestral value to the project” Yoyo explains. “This led our community to live consciously, take care of nature and taught us how to live in togetherness”.
Food is the primary medium through which we express our humanity
Yoyo was invited on behalf of NNN fellow Arne Hendriks, who curated Age of Wonderland 2015: Balancing Green and Fair Food“Food is the primary medium through which we express our humanity. Food production, its distribution and preparation, and its symbolic strength in times of crisis as well as abundance, is the main influence on how we experience and give shape to our culture" Arne elaborates.[caption id="attachment_72971" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Rice plantation. The rice sprout will grow within 4 to 6 weeks, after that period of time, they transfer the sprout to a bigger wet field.[/caption][caption id="attachment_72969" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Women threshing rice. Every process in the rice production has to be done by hand; machines are not allowed. Throughout the village, there are some areas that provided a sheltered cabin that includes sticks for the women to use.[/caption][caption id="attachment_72967" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Woman threshing rice.[/caption][caption id="attachment_72965" align="aligncenter" width="640"] A farmer's rest house located next to the king’s rice field. All the villages are obliged to help the king by planting rice. The planting has to be finished within a certain amount of time, last year all the villages had to finish within 4 weeks after king’s plantation. This tradition comes around the same time as harvest.[/caption]Yoyo believes that the introduction of more cooperative fair trade concepts will lead to a more equally spread food system. In this case, local food production would benefit both local communities and agricultural producers, as it would benefit consumers on a global scale. During his stay in The Netherlands, Yoyo realized there are only few Dutch communities whose concern is to protect and preserve their own nature and culture, and this should change. One way to do this is to "develop kinship with nature by empowering people with their own strengths, potencies and networks” as Yoyo put it.
 I will hand the ECO coin to people who respect and practice their ancestral value
Keeping in mind the ECO Coin has a symbolic value (so far), Yoyo would pass the baton to support local communities who keep living by their tribal heritage. "I will hand the ECO coin to people or communities who respect and practice their ancestral value. It is important that nature, culture and traditions are transmitted to successive generations".[caption id="attachment_72959" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Dry land plantation in the king’s rice field. In the village, people plant rice in wet and dry land (the previous images depict the wet land plantation). All the people in the village have to help on this day. Men are holding wooden sticks to make holes in the ground, and women put the rice seeds in. The plantation process starts with a ceremony held by the king and his family.[/caption][caption id="attachment_72983" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Ceremony in front of the king’s rice storage house during the biggest harvest festival called Seren Taun.[/caption]Thank you so much Yoyo Yogasmana, for sharing your thoughts and viewpoints with us. And many thanks to Adelaide Tam, for providing such wonderful images of the Ciptagelar village!Cover image: NNN Director Koert van Mensvoort handing the ECO Coin Award to Yoyo Yogasmana. Photos and captions: Adelaide Tam. [post_title] => In Conversation with Yoyo Yogasmana, Winner of the First ECO Coin Award [post_excerpt] => Read our conversation with the ECO Coin Award Winner of 2015: Yoyo Yogasmana. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interview-yoyo-yogasmana [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-12 16:00:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-12 14:00:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72308/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 65537 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2016-08-24 20:10:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-24 18:10:38 [post_content] => Last weekend a team of experts from NNN, Deloitte and Bitonic gathered at Lowlands Popfestival to explore the opportunities for a local ECO coin implementation. The ECO coin is an alternative currency that aims to give people an economical incentive, rather than only moral, to add value to their environment. A festival is a perfect local setting to test-drive the concept. The idea is to link the ECO coin to the plastic cups scattered around the venue: one coin for every cup.Turning plastic cups into coins is not new. Some years ago the festival had a system in place that allowed people to trade ten cups for one Lowlands coupon to buy drinks. Unfortunately, this system attracted professional cup gatherers to the festival, who earned three months of income in just one weekend. As these cup parasites disturbed regular visitors of the festivals, the system was abolished.The challenge for the ECO coin team is to provide people with an economical incentive to hand cups in, but avoid a complete monetization that attracts professional cup gatherers. Having an alternative ECO coin, that cannot be traded for Euros, but can be used to obtain levels of V.E.P. (Very Ecological Person) access within the festival could do the trick.Furthermore, the team concluded the ECO coin is best implemented digitally to avoid further pollution and material usage – the drink coupons at the festival are still made of old fashioned analogue plastic. The digital wallet can be connected to a personalized festival bracelet, to provide the festival visitors with a seamless experience. Technically this makes it possible to hand some cups in, scan your bracelet and increase your V.E.P. level, gaining access to all kinds of perks, such as special areas or meet & greet with bands. [post_title] => Plastic Cup Fields Are Not Forever [post_excerpt] => Exploring ECO coin opportunities at Lowlands Festival. One coin for every plastic cup! A perfect local community to prototype the concept. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => plastic-cup-fields-not-forever [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65537 [menu_order] => 101 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63592 [post_author] => 871 [post_date] => 2016-05-17 16:00:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-17 14:00:15 [post_content] => A ten part series exploring the design of an invisible technology: money.Our online reputation permeates throughout our digital world. With every website we visit, comment we leave, person we "friend", spammer we flag or badge we earn, we leave a trail of how well we can or can not be trusted. Though it may not seem like it, our reputation is becoming a valuable currency that is hard to earn and easy to lose.In recent years, this reputational currency has manifested itself through the Silicon Valley backed sharing economy, also referred to as platform capitalism by some critics. Companies like Airbnb and Uber rely on trust, reputation and peer reviews in order for their marketplaces to self regulate. The way users are rated by others on the platform has a direct correlation to how much money they can make from their apartments, or how many people demand them as a driver. A five star review is fast becoming the next hundred-dollar bill, a new symbol of reputational wealth.Since the dawn of credit (and debt), the reputation of a person has been used as a measure of their trustworthiness. This is an indicator to the creditor (usually a bank) of how likely a person is to pay back the debt they owe, usually plus interest. Credit scores are a calculation of a persons credit "worthiness". Your credit score can be a very important measurement in life. It can decide whether or not you can buy a house with a mortgage, it can be the difference between you getting a job or not and it can affect your ability to find your one true love. That's right, your credit score could hold you back from finding Mr or Mrs right. How? With a new Chinese system called the Sesame Credit.By 2020, the Chinese government is planning to implement a countrywide “social credit” score, which will rate every citizen’s “trustworthiness”. So far the government is letting companies run pilot projects, the largest one being the Sesame Credit from the giant online retailer Alibaba. It is unknown how Sesame Credit ratings are calculated, but the system takes into account a person’s Internet usage and consumption behaviour: what they buy, where they buy it, if they reviewed it and if the transaction was positive or negative. For example, a person who buys lots of video games and spends ten hours a day playing them would be considered an idle citizen, whereas someone buying baby diapers would most likely be considered a parent and so be more responsible. Citizens are encouraged to be very public about their rating and it is starting to work. Some citizens are using the Sesame Credit score to promote themselves to partners. One online dating website displays people with good Sesame Credit scores above others.This all sounds very Big Brother and somewhat terrifying: all your digital data is being collected and algorithms work out your societal worth. This system could control your entire life. If you have a low score, you might not be able to apply for certain jobs, you might loose your friends as their scores would be dragged down by your score, you might never be able to marry and have kids because nobody wants to be associated with you. This dystopic nightmare of state controlled everything is a very telling example of how a currency system can be designed for good or evil. It comes down to the mechanics of the system and some tried and tested gamification techniques.Not all systems need to be designed in such a way. In fact, systems could be designed for a more utopian outcome. An outcome that might bring technology, biology and society together. What that looks like has yet to be fully realised. Currency, whether reputational or not, is simply a tool. It can be used as a force for good or a force for evil. It is in its design that we get to decide.Read the whole Alternative Currencies, Alternative Realities series. [post_title] => Rating the Reputation Economy [post_excerpt] => Our online reputation is becoming a valuable currency that is hard to earn and easy to lose. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => rating-reputation-economy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-20 12:57:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-20 10:57:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63592 [menu_order] => 240 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63387 [post_author] => 871 [post_date] => 2016-05-04 15:47:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-04 13:47:43 [post_content] => A ten part series exploring the design of an invisible technology: money.1969. The historical year humanity first walked on the moon. This incredible event took years of engineering, billions of dollars and relied heavily upon state of the art computers. The Goddard Space Flight centre in the US was the epicenter of all these computers. Flight technicians used the IBM mainframe computer to maintain communication between Earth and the astronauts. This computer could perform several hundred thousand operations per second. Fast-forward almost 50 years and now a simple USB stick has more computational power than the computers used for the moon landing.In fact, a modern iPhone 6 can calculate 3.36 billion instructions per second. That's 32.600 times faster than the best Apollo era computer. This incredible technological evolution is well observed in Moore’s law, which states that computer processing power, doubles every two years. Our computers have moved from a niche product to a truly global technology and an integral part of our daily lives. Computers are our portals to communicate with others, they are our trusty workhorses, our private cinemas and our banks. They have become naturalized. They are part of our next nature.So what does all this computational power have to do with alternative currencies? It comes down to how cryptocurrencies are created. In traditional fiat (government backed) monetary systems, commercial banks simply offer people a loan. This is how 97% of money is created. Only a tiny fraction of fiat money is printed into banknotes. But in Bitcoin, money isn’t printed; it is discovered through mining.In a nutshell, mining is the term used for running a series of calculations on a computer to verify the transactions that take place in the Bitcoin network. About every ten minutes, a new block of transaction data is created and the miners who created the block are rewarded with bitcoins. This serves the Bitcoin network both as a system to verify transactions and as a system for fairly distributing new Bitcoins. (If you want to know a bit more about the process, here is a great description of how mining works). Mining was intentionally designed to be resource-intensive and its difficulty to get harder over time. When Bitcoins first came into existence anyone could mine them from a laptop, but now specialized "mining farms" tend to do the majority of the mining.Instead of housing animals, these 21st century farms house computers. Thousands upon thousands of specialised mining computers are used, which demand an enormous amount of electricity to power fans to keep the machines from overheating. Some farms have moved to colder climates to try to reduce their energy consumption.[caption id="attachment_63396" align="aligncenter" width="740"]bitcoin farm mining rigs KnCMiner’s farm is located near the Arctic Circle to keep its 45,000 mining computers from overheating.[/caption]Many have criticized this energy intensive mining process and have tried to find other solutions. For example cryptocurrencies like Litecoin and Auroracoin are pre-mined, meaning that most of the hard computational algorithms are already solved. Foldingcoin goes one step further by taking advantage of the unused computational power of the general public to help Stanford University researchers find cures for some of the worlds worst diseases. By mining Foldingcoin you are directly contributing to scientific breakthroughs for diseases like Alzheimer, many forms of cancer and Aids. On top of this you are getting paid to do it.The Stanford researchers are trying to grow this network: "The problems we are trying to solve require so many calculations, we ask people to donate their unused computer power to crunch some of the numbers. Donate your computer to over 107,000 others around the world outputting  20,000 teraflops of computing power to form the world's largest distributed supercomputer".The way money comes into existence is entirely designable. The form that it takes, whether physical or digital still takes energy and resources to make and so the way we create money should not simply be a means to an end, but should help our biosphere, technosphere and society flourish. With great computational power, comes great responsibility.Source: Foldingcoin. Image: KnCMinerRead the whole Alternative Currencies, Alternative Realities series. [post_title] => A Cryptocurrency Helping to Cure Cancer [post_excerpt] => Part two of a ten part series exploring the design of an invisible technology: money. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cryptocurrency-helping-cure-cancer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-20 12:56:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-20 10:56:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63387 [menu_order] => 257 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81165 [post_author] => 1593 [post_date] => 2018-03-28 17:37:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-28 16:37:46 [post_content] => It takes years to design a new banknote, having hundreds of people working on every little detail, all done under the watchful eye of governments and professionals. However today, blockchain technology allows anyone to create and launch their own digital cryptocurrency in less than a minute with only a few clicks. What does this all mean? In this Deep Dive series, we take a closer look at some of these new coins, diving into the technology that underpins them, and explore what this may mean for the future of money.

Economy is ecology

We are living in a world of accelerating change: Ecologies are being put to waste while new ones are being formed at any given moment, anywhere in the world. This extreme throughput of ecologies is surely also the case in our financial world. As soon as a new ecology emerges (like the sharing economy), the financial world rushes in to create an economy for it.Such a market is made from trade and conversions between shares, stocks or equities: whatever product is needed to plug it into our complex economic process. But the rules of this process remain unclear. They surely differ from the strict programming rules behind an app or website in the way that, even though we can create these markets, we never know how they will behave or what their value will be in the future. It’s an ecology of itself, something worth studying in order to learn from its behaviour.With the ECO Coin, we are aiming to create an ecological economy: an economy that is directly connected to the global, ecological sphere. To do so, we make use of cryptocurrency- and blockchain technology, and in this story, we will introduce you to the dynamics and systems that continuously feed the development of this ecological economy platform we’re currently building.Cryptocurrencies are constantly 'moving'; either up, down or sideways. And millions of dollars are flying across blockchains, faster than the speed of light. As a result, shares are being dropped for this hot new investment alternative, and money is lost in this process - hitting the people hardest who are struggling to see the cryptocurrency market for what it is: highly speculative.To that end, it is right to assume that a ‘cryptocurrency trader’ is one of the new jobs of the future, perhaps it’s as normal as being a stock trader is today.

Have you seen the latest thing in the cryptocurrency world?

No you probably haven’t. CoinMarketCap (an industry-standard listing service for cryptocurrencies) has added 58 new cryptos in the past 28 days. That’s 2 per day!By the time you are reading this, chances are that 10 new ICO’s (Initial Coin Offerings) have been launched and five crypto companies have gone bankrupt.But there are also currencies and platforms that choose a different direction. They function more like incentive structures for ‘good’ behaviour. In these, the token (a word used synonymously with the words cryptocurrency and coin) doesn’t necessarily hold any economic value, but more so signifies certain wanted behaviour, like ecological behavior.When such a platform goes bust, it’s simply a failed iteration on how to digitise socially responsible behaviour.Users and speculators often regard these incentive-based coins as being ‘the new Bitcoin’, and see dollar signs when they start using them. This is something specific to the cryptocurrency market: if there’s liquidity (which in this case directly assumes socially responsible behaviour) then there must surely be something backing that coin, and it’s a solid reason to invest.The gold standard backed our financial system in the past. But we’re long past that now. The crypto avant-garde roaming the web right now is eagerly searching for the next, big asset-backed coin that they can invest into. Whether its backed by something or not.

A token for everything

While there are a lot of great use cases out there in crypto-land, it’s hard to see the actual implementation of these in day-to-day life. Cryptographic tokens can resemble voting ballots, discounts or even bought products. But as of yet, there are no tokens yet that are as normal as paying with good ol' paper money.Moving beyond blockchain technology, programmers have recently tried to crack a use case for the IOTA token (a token that will supposedly empower the Internet-of-Things revolution), but didn't succeed to find one. This shows us that a lot of conceptually valuable tokens are not being used for anything yet. At current, the IOTA token is still unusable: a speculative coin that is being bought with the assumption that its value will rise over time.Perhaps it's good that cryptocurrencies have not penetrated everything yet, this gives us some time to reflect upon its cause. The cryptocurrency world is only 10 years young and we shouldn’t just throw away thousands of years of economic history.

A new financial elite

Currently there's a pool of young (and rich) programmers that now make up the new financial elite, because this group bought into Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies very early on in the process.You could say that this new financial elite is one of our Next Natures: A new financial elite, or the crypto investors and programmers that make up most of this sector, create autonomous systems as a way of providing sustenance (income) to themselves. Instead of dialing into existing structures, they continually create new ones and find a place within that new framework.An important distinction, of course, being that they are not in control of these systems but merely the architects of them, where in the traditional financial world, the ‘quants’ or architects do have the possibility to significantly control the networks they manage, because they program within the same network. That is why cryptocurrencies are ‘moving’ so fast now.

Crypto markets: What’s the silver lining?

Blockchain is still on a level where my grandfather is unable to pay for anything with crypto, and 'day-traders' who are investing in cryptocurrencies are losing money on a daily basis.In fact, only a small percentage of them are able to make a living off of their bets, but are far removed from how the act of trading in stocks and exchanges has developed in the ‘regular’ financial world.In case you are interested in cryptocurrencies after reading this article, but are also confused by the sheer speed of its development, then there’s only a few things that you need to do: invest as little as you can, don’t be afraid of losing it, take it easy, approach markets safely and most important of all: sit back and watch.Crypto will be around long enough for you to pick the fruits of its development. So until then, learn as much as you can, do your own research and talk to as many different people as possible.The technology behind any cryptocurrency (the blockchain) is revolutionary. It can literally connect citizens together as a people, regardless of nationality, social class or political inclination. That is beautiful dream that ECO Coin is happy to keep alive and a dream we will be talking about a lot in the coming months.Perhaps what the world of cryptocurrency needs is to pick up a slower pace. This gives us some time to reflect upon its past 10 years, and think about what's possible in the next 100 years. [post_title] => Slowing down to start up: Here's the first chapter of our crypto deep dive series [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => deep-dive-series-speed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-17 11:38:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-17 10:38:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81165 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 46 [max_num_pages] => 5 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 2c612e90fad619e62cfe3ac5ffb634e3 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
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