59 results for “in vitro meat”

Aleph Farms just grew meat in space for the first time

Freya Hutchings
October 9th 2019

Hello meat lovers! In vitro meat innovator Aleph Farms has taken the saying 'one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind' to a whole new level. The startup has succeeded in producing slaughter-free meat on the international space station (ISS), 339 km away from any natural resources, in one of the most extreme environments imaginable. Let's get you up to speed.


Didier Toubia, Co-Founder and CEO of Aleph Farms says that the project — a collaboration with …

Future Food: Here’s what we’ll be eating in 2050

NextNature.net
August 1st 2019

What will you be having for breakfast, lunch or dinner in 2050? Where will this food be sourced? And how will it be prepared? Edible insects? A hamburger made from cultured meat? Or powders based on your DNA profile?

It may sound far-fetched, but with a growing world population we must carefully consider how to grow our food in the future. At our Future Food exhibition (i.c.w. NEMO Science Museum) you will get an insight into your future meals based …

10 Next Nature dinner table conversation starters

Ruben Baart
June 27th 2019

Summer is here and the sun is out, and yes, this is awesome. After a long day in the sizzling summer sun, you get a group of people together to share some delicious food, catch-up, and, of course, have dinner table conversations.

Dinnertime can be the perfect time to talk with your family, friends or colleagues. However, after a long day, you may find yourself having not much to say at the dinner table. Then, the pre-dinner party fear starts …

Taco futures: In vitro meat in Mexico City

Alejandro Alvarez
February 21st 2019

Our In Vitro Meat Cookbook has inspired many people around the world. Just recently, we had the BBC over at our headquarters to see what makes us thick.

This idea of in vitro meat certainly is — at least for now — an elaborate portion of food for thought (meat oyster anyone?). And with this in mind, the alumni of Tecnológico de Monterrey university, Mexico City, challenged themselves to speculate on possible (local) futures for in vitro meat and boil …

How in vitro meat became a subject of debate in the Dutch parliament

Ruben Baart
September 26th 2018

To all in vitro meat optimists, hear hear! In May 2018 we launched the petition 'In vitro meat is here. Let us taste it.' We proudly announce that this petition led to parliamentary questions, followed by a roundtable discussion with members of the Dutch parliament (which took place today). Prior to this debate, we were invited to hand over our petition - which was signed by 3282 people, thank you! - to the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, …

Human Nature, designing the equilibrium with Koert van Mensvoort

NextNature.net
June 19th 2018

Under the title Human Nature, designing the equilibrium, eleven designers will answer questions about a future in which Humankind and Nature enter into a new relationship. An initiative of Connecting the Dots and Creative Holland, we are happy to share our vision about this symbiosis in relation to our food, as told by our very own Koert van Mensvoort.…

Aleph Farms wants to bring clean meat from the lab to the next farming industry

Kelly Streekstra
June 19th 2018

Growing meat artificially, instead of within an animal, may soon be an available reality. Meet one of the pioneering developers of this product of the future: Aleph Farms. With their innovative methods, they are better able to mimic the structure and texture of our well-known beef. But they want to go beyond just mimicking 'real' meat. We spoke with Didier Toubia, founder and CEO of Aleph Farms, who sparked our imagination with his idea of the next farming industry. Are …

In vitro meat is here! But we are not allowed to taste it

NextNature.net
May 22nd 2018

Previously we predicted that we would be eating in vitro meat by 2028. But as it turns out... In vitro meat is already here! And we are not allowed to eat it. The meat has been sealed by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, under new European 'Novel Foods' legislation. This means that we cannot test it. Therefore, we started a petition. We want to taste this in vitro meat at our own risk. Sign if you want …

‘I volunteer myself to try this cultured meat at my own risk’

Van Mensvoort
May 22nd 2018

The Netherlands leads in cheese, clogs, and cultured meat. This sustainable and animal-friendly form of meat has largely been developed in our country. In 1997, Willem van Eelen obtained the first patent on the technique, whereby animal cells are grown into muscle tissue without any animals needing to be slaughtered…

How the Dutch government is obstructing the advent of in vitro meat

Ruben Baart
May 22nd 2018

In 2017, two years after her father died, Ira van Eelen decided to call the Dutch Arable Farming Union. She couldn't help but wonder how come the Netherlands was still not leading the next food revolution.…

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Hello meat lovers! In vitro meat innovator Aleph Farms has taken the saying 'one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind' to a whole new level. The startup has succeeded in producing slaughter-free meat on the international space station (ISS), 339 km away from any natural resources, in one of the most extreme environments imaginable. Let's get you up to speed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-_Zy-arDb0&feature=youtu.be

Didier Toubia, Co-Founder and CEO of Aleph Farms says that the project — a collaboration with 3D Bioprinting technologies (RUS), Meal Source Technologies (US) and Finless Foods (US) — is a “keystone of human achievement” that “marks a significant first step toward achieving our vision to ensure food security for generations to come, while preserving our natural resources.” Put differently, this could have huge implications for the future of our food production.

How does it work?

The beef is produced under highly controlled conditions that mimic the natural process of muscle-tissue regeneration found in cows. 3D bioprinting technology is applied to replicate this process, resulting in the production of nutritious steaks made from in vitro meat cells. This method uses minimal resources and drastically diminishes the need for livestock, water and land.

What are the wider implications?

In September of this year an intergovernmental panel report on climate change, established by the UN, highlighted the hugely damaging effects of animal farming methods on the environment. Indeed, it takes 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of beef, and runoff from factory farms and livestock is one of the leading causes of pollution in rivers and lakes.

Moreover, in the US alone, 56 million acres of land are used to grow feed for animals, while only 4 million acres produce plants for humans to eat. Here we clearly see the huge potential for change when the resources needed to produce meat are dramatically decreased.

This could be a revolutionary possibility for feeding the world’s ever-increasing population - set to reach 10 billion by 2050. This development proves nutritious food can be created anywhere and in the most unlikely of environments. With land disappearing due to rising sea levels and desertification, the possibility of growing food in space could be a gamechanger.

What’s next?

Now we know it's easy to get wrapped up in the excitement of space travel and imagining future solutions for rapidly increasing climate change. However, these technologies may also be essential for addressing current issues on earth where arable land and water is already scarce. Could Aleph farms’ breakthrough provide nutrition for populations that already suffer from food shortages?

Indeed, while technologies of this kind work to ensure future food security, we should consider how they can be implemented as a solution for present day food shortages in areas of the world where a lack of food is not a distant, science-fiction nightmare but a daily reality.

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What will you be having for breakfast, lunch or dinner in 2050? Where will this food be sourced? And how will it be prepared? Edible insects? A hamburger made from cultured meat? Or powders based on your DNA profile?

It may sound far-fetched, but with a growing world population we must carefully consider how to grow our food in the future. At our Future Food exhibition (i.c.w. NEMO Science Museum) you will get an insight into your future meals based on plantbased, animal based and functional food scenarios.

From exploring fungal futures and designing your own vegetables, to getting to know Ira van Eelen and browsing through speculative dishes from our bistro in vitro — this will be a date to remember.

Workshops

Besides a visit to the exhibition you can also participate in workshops such as tasting insects, testing your nose and developing your future recipe. Workshops are held in both Dutch and English.

Evening programme on Wednesdays

In addition to a visit to the exhibition, you can also attend various workshops, lectures and other events on Wednesday evenings. Please note most of these activities are held in Dutch. You can find the full programme here.

Location, opening hours and tickets

You can visit Future Food between 10 July and 6 October 2019 at the Studio at the Marineterrein. The Studio is open on Wednesdays from 10:00-22:00 and Thursday through Sunday from 10:00-17:30. The Studio is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. 

Your NEMO ticket includes a visit to the Studio. If you only wish to see the Future Food exhibition, get your ticket here.

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Summer is here and the sun is out, and yes, this is awesome. After a long day in the sizzling summer sun, you get a group of people together to share some delicious food, catch-up, and, of course, have dinner table conversations.

Dinnertime can be the perfect time to talk with your family, friends or colleagues. However, after a long day, you may find yourself having not much to say at the dinner table. Then, the pre-dinner party fear starts to kick in, and you wonder what you were ever thinking organizing such a disaster. Except, it won't be a disaster.

Leading up to the opening of our Future Food expo at NEMO Science Museum in Amsterdam, a journey alongside the food of the future that will surely serve plenty food for thought, these dinner table conversation starters can already help you ensure that, whatever the connections, the conversations flow as smoothly as a glass of NANO Wine.

1 Did you know that meat-eating made us who we are today: evolved, intelligent humans, able to use a verbal language.

2 Intelligent beings as we are, eating meat has harmful consequences for the planet, thus we seek for alternatives: In-vitro meat. It's already here, but the government does not allow us to taste it.

3 Another alternative to eating meat: Insects! Believe it or not, insect ramen is a big hit in Japan.

4 Staying with insects, cockroach milk is here. The next superfood? Oat milk is sooo 2018.

5 Bionic spinach could be used as biological bomb detectors (talk about superfoods).

6 Rather design your own vegetable? You can! This kitchen application allows you to design your own vegetables.

7 That banana you buy in the supermarket is a product of nature, right? Not really. It's a product of design.

8 Into futuristic kitchenware? Meet the robot fridge that forces you to smile for your food (say cheese, literally).

9 Edible packaging: How seaweed could replace plastic in disposable packaging.

10 Ever wished to eat anything you want without worrying about calories or allergies? It could be possible thanks to augmented reality.

PS: Not sure what to serve at your dinner party? There's an app for that. Chef Watson is an artificial intelligence from IBM that knows over 10,000 recipes from all over the world and is capable of combining any ingredient while following your personal food preferences.

Cover image taken at Mediamatic during our dinner with Chef Watson.

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Our In Vitro Meat Cookbook has inspired many people around the world. Just recently, we had the BBC over at our headquarters to see what makes us thick.

This idea of in vitro meat certainly is — at least for now — an elaborate portion of food for thought (meat oyster anyone?). And with this in mind, the alumni of Tecnológico de Monterrey university, Mexico City, challenged themselves to speculate on possible (local) futures for in vitro meat and boil up thoughts on how Mexican cuisine may change along the way.

But first

Mexico city is a metropolis with approximately 8.8 million inhabitants. It faces the 'common' problems for any big city: traffic, pollution, overpopulation and delinquency. Yet it stands out for it also faces some 'less common' problems. Think earthquakes, sinking buildings and water shortages.

Each of these issues are rooted in a long history of a series of (bad) decisions that all seemed to lack any future perspective. At that time, building a city over a lake perhaps seemed like a good idea, but today the chilangos (residents of Mexico City, ed.) have to deal with the consequences of such a decision.

Nevertheless, the citizens of Mexico City do enjoy a vibrant culture and all the wicked food flavors this entails. Having that said, foodies in Mexico City will have no problem at all finding the corn, cheese and chilli combos to satisfy their every craving, from the southern Oaxaca to the northernmost Tijuana — let alone the local surprises available at the many street food stands.

These two aspects of the metropolis where addressed during the workshop by the young talents, led by industrial designer Mariana Pedroza from Antefuturo. Working with the Pyramid of Technology toolkit, this creative session resulted in three future-proof scenarios that each show how speculative design holds the ability to deliver fresh insights that may inspire many more to come. Let's dig in.

Scenario 1: Filter

It's 2040 and Mexico City is suffering through an extreme water crisis. Therefore team Filter has envisioned traditional aguas frescas (fruits water) — but with a twist.

At their street stand, they are turning urine into water. Here's how it works: First you go to the special urinals where your urine is analyzed and stored. Based on this analysis, they recommend the adequate drink in order to keep you healthy.

At the bar there are different beverages available, all made from the recycled water of the city sewage, to which you just have contributed.

Scenario 2: Autonomous Street Vendor

It's 2050 and mobility in the city has drastically changed: Cars are no longer taking up all the space, as bicycles have popped up as the standard mode of transport.

As a result, the days of loud food trucks, ice cream vendors or pan dulce sellers are over. Instead, we now have Autonomous Street Vendor Drones: Floating humming drones that substitute the megaphones of food trucks. You'll hear them buzz around town, and you simply take a cycling break to enjoy a hot tamal oaxaqueño. Cheers!

Scenario 3: Meat Biohacking Lab

As emerging technologies drive new business and service models, governments must rapidly create, modify, and enforce regulations — not always in favor of its citizens.

In this scenario, in vitro meat is forbidden in Mexico City due to ill-advised security concerns. However, as the food shortage in many neighbourhoods grows, this has led to the creation of so-called Meat Biohacking Labs: underground facilities where citizens meet to produce (human) in vitro meat for self- consumption.

Pictures and project by Mariana Pedroza

PS: Do you want to organize your own next nature workshop? You can! Drop us a line at academy[at]nextnature[dot]com.

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To all in vitro meat optimists, hear hear! In May 2018 we launched the petition 'In vitro meat is here. Let us taste it.' We proudly announce that this petition led to parliamentary questions, followed by a roundtable discussion with members of the Dutch parliament (which took place today). Prior to this debate, we were invited to hand over our petition - which was signed by 3282 people, thank you! - to the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, and with that, briefly share our viewpoints on in vitro meat in the Netherlands; today, tomorrow, and beyond.

The start of a petition

In vitro meat is a sustainable and animal-friendly alternative to traditional meat. In January 2018, the first trial packages were deliverd to the Netherlands. We wanted to taste it, but we were not allowed. And we started a petition. Allow us to refresh your memory:

We observed

And requested

  • That the tasting of the in vitro meat can take place.
  • For the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority to take an active stance by testing the trial packages of in vitro meat.
  • That the government will do everything in its power to establish the Netherlands as a place where sustainable innovations (such as in vitro meat) can not only be conceived but can also introduced!
NNN director Koert van Mensvoort ready to hand over the petition!
The moment. In order of appearance: Tjeerd de Groot (D66), Koert van Mensvoort (NNN), Martijn van Helvert (CDA), Laura Bromet (GroenLinks), Arne Weverling (VVD), Maurits von Martels (CDA).

A round table

Besides the members of parliament, a number of scientists, entrepreneurs, philosophers and social influencers were asked to join the debate and present their views on in vitro meat. Given, we're taking baby steps here, but the MP meeting is certainly a step forward, and all yesterday's attendees seemed to agree on that one.

The session was split up in three blocks - science, business and society - that do so much to help inform and stimulate debate around the table. In the following, we'll take a closer look at what's to come next.

Meat is a cultural artefact

"Meat is an intrinsic part of the modern diet," says Daan Luining, research division director at CAS (Cellular Agriculture Society). In his words: "Meat is more than just proteins: it's (part of our) culture."

In a recent estimate of the number of vegetarians in the world, only 75 million people are vegetarians by choice, a number that will gradually grow with increasing affluence and education. The other 1450 million are vegetarians of necessity. They will start to eat meat as soon as they can afford it.

"Meat has to do with prosperity," says Peter Verstrate, CEO at MosaMeat. "When cultures are becoming wealthier, the first thing the population does is adding meat to their diets - instead of buying new cars."

And then there's the experience of eating meat. Often the desire to eat meat is rooted in habit. According to Verstrate, we are "addicted to meat" - and this may be the core of our problems. "Meat is the holy grail, and producers of vegetable products know this only too well."

At Next Nature Network, we could not agree more, hence our Meat the Future project, exploring the potential and food cultures in vitro meat will bring us - through design. With system change comes behavioral change.

What's in a name?

Lab-grown meat? Cultured meat? In vitro meat? Clean meat? How to name such a product?

Dr. Arnout Fischer, associate professor in consumer behaviour at Wageningen University (WUR), points out that "by naming [it] 'clean meat', consumers may loose their trust in the food industry. It's a great task that lies with the government." Anticipating on his comment, politician Tjeerd de Groot from D66, the social, liberal party wrote a tweet to call upon the Dutch citizens to come up with a name (Thoughts? Let us know in the comments below!).

Fischer has done important research on how consumers think about in vitro meat. He found that the Dutch population holds no objections to the product (be it a 'neutral' stance), but there's also not a real demand for it. Surprisingly, just 5% of the Dutch populace regards in vitro meat as an important opportunity to reach our climate goals.

However, what it comes down to is this. The name should highlight the fact that the product is a meat produce like no other. Just imagine a future where in vitro meat becomes cheaper than 'analogue' meat, and is being sold like the 'real thing'.

The government needs to take a stance

"In vitro meat should come more natural to us," says Ira van Eelen, in vitro meat optimist, marketeer and member of JUST's advisory board. The self-described 'nexitarian' thinks its important that, for society to fully accept the product, we must call a spade a spade: "It's just meat!"

Van Eelen too, feels strongly about the missed opportunity of launching the product in the Netherlands earlier this year. Now, other countries are now taking the lead in this revolution. She points out that worldwide there are about thirty start-ups working on the production of in vitro meat, and The Netherlands are now falling behind.

Due to the European legislation holding off the in vitro meat, this sends a negative message to society, and it's about time we change that. "The government needs to take a stance, and inform citizens in a neutral, subjective way on what the product is and is not."

"The next step is to make it sexy for students to specialize in making in vitro meat instead of becoming a doctor," she adds. Like other entrepreneurs, she calls on the Dutch government to invest in knowledge and education about in vitro meat. "There's a whole new generation of scientists on the rise who will bring this forward." Not back to, but forward to Nature!

Have thoughts? Let us know in the comments below!

[post_title] => How in vitro meat became a subject of debate in the Dutch parliament [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => in-vitro-meat-petition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 17:41:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 16:41:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91218 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 82037 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-06-19 07:27:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-19 06:27:07 [post_content] => Under the title Human Nature, designing the equilibrium, eleven designers will answer questions about a future in which Humankind and Nature enter into a new relationship. An initiative of Connecting the Dots and Creative Holland, we are happy to share our vision about this symbiosis in relation to our food, as told by our very own Koert van Mensvoort. [post_title] => Human Nature, designing the equilibrium with Koert van Mensvoort [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => human-nature-with-koert-van-mensvoort [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-19 07:29:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-19 06:29:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=82037 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81899 [post_author] => 1510 [post_date] => 2018-06-19 07:09:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-19 06:09:10 [post_content] => Growing meat artificially, instead of within an animal, may soon be an available reality. Meet one of the pioneering developers of this product of the future: Aleph Farms. With their innovative methods, they are better able to mimic the structure and texture of our well-known beef. But they want to go beyond just mimicking 'real' meat. We spoke with Didier Toubia, founder and CEO of Aleph Farms, who sparked our imagination with his idea of the next farming industry. Are farms the clean meat laboratoria of the future?In a conversation with our friends at the Good Food Institute, Matt Ball told us about the work of Aleph Farms. He states: “Aleph Farms has an absolutely world-class scientific team! If they are successful with growing four distinct cell types in three dimensions, they will be able to replicate more complex cuts of meat than are currently being attempted by other clean meat startups.”We got in touch with Didier Toubia, CEO and founder of Aleph Farms, and found ourselves inspired by their ideas, technology and innovation.

Towards taking the cow out of the steak

The lacking animal welfare, the high environmental impact, and the potential health issues related to our traditional meat industry, are motivating a quest for a better alternative to our dearly-loved meat. Didier Toubia explains “With Aleph Farms, we're part of what is called the ‘cellular agricultural revolution’, a transition towards agriculture where we’re directly growing tissues off of cells instead of growing the whole animal.”Didier compares this growth of meat to hydroponic agriculture, where crops are grown without soil, but attached to nutrient flows. “The same as there are ways to grow vegetables disconnected from the soil, we are growing a steak disconnected from the cow.”However, before this revolution can unravel, the clean meat industry is facing multiple challenges.“Developing cost-effective growth media is the biggest challenge for clean meat's future at the moment.” Matt ball explains. Didier Toubia adds: “Scaling up the production efficiency, and lowering the costs of the current methods, are well-known challenges that we, as well as other companies, are working hard for to overcome.”But Didier sees another challenge. "It’s also important that at the end of the day, the clean meat product will be attractive and appealing to the consumer.” Therefore, the currently lab-grown meat must develop further. “It has to be a complex piece of meat, with a texture and structure which is closer to real meat.”
“The same as there are ways to grow vegetables disconnected from the soil, we are growing a steak disconnected from the cow.”
Aleph farms may be able to further this resemblance of meat. “We bring two innovations to the clean meat industry. Firstly, we developed a method with Technion, the University in Haifa, where they use a platform for regenerative medicine that restores and repairs tissues for patients. With this method we can grow a 3 dimensional cut of meat.”“Moreover, we are the first to generate meat with 4 types of cells. Besides the muscles cells and fat, we also have connective tissue and blood vessels in our meat.”Besides these advancements in the clean meat development, they seem eager to take on another challenge. “Beef is probably the least sustainable type of meat, and it is triggering most problems in the meat industry these days. However, there is only two countries in the world working on lab-grown beef, as it is a much more complex type of meat to grow in a lab. We believe our technology is capable of doing the job, so we choose to start our clean meat development with beef.”

Clean meat is to be differentiated from traditional meat

Didier is keen to emphasize: “To start off, the end-product is meat, just meat. Lettuce is a lettuce no matter how you grow it. The same counts for lab-grown meat, which is in the end meat. We just grow it in a more advanced manner.”But, the end goal is not necessarily to make a piece of meat that one cannot distinguish from real meat. “I think it is necessary to go beyond mimicking real meat.”“In the beginning clean meat will still be more expensive than cow-meat. Moreover, if people know the meat is not produced exactly like cow-meat, a psychological bias will likely give them the sensation that the meat does not taste the same.”
"Clean meat should be unique and new experience, that differentiates the product from traditional meat and grants some real added value."
These arguments led Didier to the following conclusion. “I think it is better if we don’t directly compete with traditional meat, but that it is ‘clean meat’ as a statement. Clean meat should be unique and new experience, that differentiates the product from traditional meat and grants some real added value. Your In Vitro Meat Cookbook with that respect is, well, a pioneering vision for clean meat, which I liked very much.”The process of developing clean meat also allows for this differentiation. “Clean meat offers lots of possibilities when compared to traditional ways of growing meat.” For instance, “We have some freedom in the ratio between fat and muscle tissue, as such we can develop products with a different nutritional profile.” That reminds us a little of our home incubator, no?Alongside the unique experience of clean meat, Didier trusts that clean meat will already be attractive to people for its "cleaner" nature. “We like to see clean meat as something mainstream, meaning it addresses the need of many consumers who are more and more aware of the downsides of real meat." Didier explains. "The process of growing the meat is more efficient, sustainable and ethical. Furthermore, because we grow the meat in controlled conditions, there is no need for animal antibiotics. And it is free of contamination, as this is a prevailing risk at slaughterhouses, which obviously won’t apply to clean meat.”Opening the market for clean meat, starts simply with spreading that exact message. "If you want to further the development of clean meat, spread the word that clean meat is better for the planet, better for us as humans, and better for the animals."

The next laboratory is actually a farm

The original term ‘in vitro meat’ is not used by Didier. And, I have to admit, when I think of clean meat, I still see a petri dish with a perfectly pink piece of meat in it. This association with the lab may repel people from the concept. However, the future of clean meat is not envisioned to take place in a laboratorium.Didier explains: “Even your most standard cookie was once made in the lab, like any new food product starts in the lab for research and development.” It is not surprising that, now that clean meat is slowly progressing from this R&D stage, the industry is both moving and rebranding its product. Didier chooses specifically to envision an integration of the old and the new. The future of in vitro meat, may just find its way into our well-known farms.“We envision that the production of clean meat will be done in bio farms. I believe that those biofarms can be integrated with the traditional farms, which nowadays are already very high-tech. Farmers are integrating new technologies and approaches all the time. I see clean meat simply as another improved technique for agriculture, giving farmers additional revenues. I think they are the best partners for us to produce clean meat globally and to increase production capacities quickly. I don't feel safe as a biotech company, but I’m sure as a farming business.”
I don't feel safe as a biotech company, but I’m more sure as a farming business.
We at Next Nature are more than curious to see how Aleph Farms will continue to develop their innovative methods, their differentiated meat experience and their ideas for the next farming industry. Thank you for sharing, Didier Toubia! [post_title] => Aleph Farms wants to bring clean meat from the lab to the next farming industry [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => meet-aleph-farms-clean-meat [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-10 16:34:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-10 15:34:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81899 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81684 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-05-22 12:02:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-22 11:02:04 [post_content] =>
Previously we predicted that we would be eating in vitro meat by 2028. But as it turns out... In vitro meat is already here! And we are not allowed to eat it. The meat has been sealed by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, under new European 'Novel Foods' legislation. This means that we cannot test it. Therefore, we started a petition. We want to taste this in vitro meat at our own risk. Sign if you want to taste in vitro meat.
The problem The Netherlands has been leading the research on in vitro meat for the past 20 years. There has been a patent since 1999 and in 2013 the first lab-grown burger was cooked and eaten. The trial packages are currently in the Netherlands, but are sealed by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority. We want to eat it, but we are not allowed to!The solution The Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority should become an active contributer to innovation by testing the in vitro meat test packages.What can you do? Sign the petition if you agree and also want to taste in vitro meat. [post_title] => In vitro meat is here! But we are not allowed to taste it [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => petition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-11 13:07:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-11 12:07:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81684 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81676 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2018-05-22 12:01:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-22 11:01:51 [post_content] => The Netherlands leads in cheese, clogs, and cultured meat. This sustainable and animal-friendly form of meat has largely been developed in our country. In 1997, Willem van Eelen obtained the first patent on the technique, whereby animal cells are grown into muscle tissue without any animals needing to be slaughteredAt the beginning of this century, the Dutch government invested substantial money into the scientific research being carried out at the universities of Utrecht, Amsterdam, and Eindhoven. In 2013, professor Mark Post of Maastricht University presented the first in vitro burger to the world. From 2011 onwards, I myself researched the possible impact of such technology at the Eindhoven University of Technology, and in 2014 we at Next Nature Network published the first In Vitro Meat Cookbook to stimulate the societal discussion of the future of meat.According to the United Nations, excessive meat consumption constitutes one of the largest environmental problems of our time. Although it’s well-known that global warming is a problem, far fewer people know that meat production is responsible for a significant proportion of the harmful greenhouse gases causing it. If we want to realize the goals of the Paris Agreement, we have to somehow shrink the numbers of our livestock in the coming years, according to a recent report of the Dutch Council for the Environment and Infrastructure. Since not everyone is prepared to immediately turn vegetarian, and since meat consumption in developing economies such as India and China rises with prosperity, we must explore all possible alternatives.Although many people still experience in vitro meat as artificial and unnatural, the manufacturing process is comparable to beer-brewing or cheese-making; both depend on the feeding of cell cultures. The most important difference is that in vitro meat is new, and therefore alien and unusual. Maybe in 2050 it will be perfectly normal to grow a piece of meat in your own kitchen. For the time being, is it “Trust what you know?” Not quite. Research into public willingness to consume in vitro meat reveals that between 40 and 70% of the population are open to trying it or even to making the switch.Because the first in vitro burger cost €250,000 in 2013, this more sustainable and animal-friendly form of meat production can seem like a distant dream. But make no mistake. The first flat-screen televisions were also affordable only to millionaires. Today, almost everyone has one hanging in their bedroom.Meat is a billion-dollar industry around the world. The business that succeeds in serving a portion of this market with in vitro meat will not only contribute to a more sustainable world; there is also the potential to earn a great deal of money. International investors haven’t failed to notice this. At this very moment, various businesses around the world are busy bringing in vitro meat to the market.One of those businesses is the American JUST, which claims to have made cultured nuggets, chorizo meat and even foie gras from animal cells. The CEO of this business, Josh Tetrick, wants to bring his product to market in 2018. Because he recognizes our country’s history with cultured meat, Tetrick recently hosted the first public tasting of in vitro meat at a Dutch restaurant, as well as at the NEMO Science Museum, the idea being to present his product to the world from its point of origin.As an in vitro meat explorer since the beginning, I was invited to the dinner and thrilled to have the chance to try the product. But it never got that far. On the authority of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, an inspector from the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA) came to seal up the packets of cultured meat. Because this product hasn’t yet been approved by the European “Novel Food” legislation, we aren’t allowed to consume it. In reaction to this, the presentation is likely to take place in Asia instead.Give me a break. In the Netherlands, we have played a leading role in this sustainable innovation since day one. The government has invested money in the research. Now that a number of important technical and societal hurdles surrounding the manufacturing process and consumer acceptance have been overcome, that same government is going to raise a legal barrier by forbidding the presentation of the product in the Netherlands.Don’t get me wrong. I understand that cultured meat products must be thoroughly researched and tested before we can offer them to consumers in the supermarket. Is in vitro meat safe? Is it healthy? We all want to know. All those doubts must be addressed before it can go on sale. But you can’t find any of that out if government agencies seal up cultured meat packages before they can be tested at all.The Dutch are known worldwide for our cheese and our delicious light beer. We have a unique chance here to add a new product category to that list. Our government’s ambitious business policy aims to make us into the most creative economy in Europe. We want our innovation and food production to outshine the world. And this is what we do about it?If I may put a request to the government: I want to ask that the NVWA be instructed to lift the seal immediately, and that the government take an active stance by allowing the new food products to be tested as soon as possible. I volunteer myself to try this cultured meat at my own risk. And we’ve started a petition. Sign if you want the opportunity to try it yourself. [post_title] => 'I volunteer myself to try this cultured meat at my own risk' [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => in-vitro-meat-is-here [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81676 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81652 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2018-05-22 12:01:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-22 11:01:37 [post_content] => In 2017, two years after her father died, Ira van Eelen decided to call the Dutch Arable Farming Union. She couldn't help but wonder how come the Netherlands was still not leading the next food revolution.What followed was an unexpected call from Josh Tetrick, the lightning-rod CEO of billion-dollar US food startup JUST (formerly Hampton Creek), who invited her over for a tasting in the kitchen of their laboratory in San Fransisco. From that moment on, things started to move. Quickly.The company bought the patents from her father and took Ira in on the member advisory board to bring her father's dream to the market by the end of 2018. "Being on the market is part of the learning experiment," says Van Eelen, "this is how it becomes real.”Together they spoke with governments in the US, Singapore, China and the Netherlands to explore what leadership in this field looks like. Ira convinced Josh to introduce the meat in the Netherlands due to its background and inherence in the field, and it seemed as if nothing could stop the two in doing so.Ira did her research and learned from the Dutch Arable Farming Union that a business proposal was needed in order to get the dream done. Knowing this, this led her to “behave in an appropriate matter” when offering the Dutch government a proposal to jointly take the lead in a well-orchestrated tasting experiment within the margins of the law.Together with JUST, Ira proposed serving victimless fois gras to the dinner table. “People were already eating fois gras before 1997,” Ira commemorates - this was the year her father initially filed the patent.Whilst setting up arrangements, Van Eelen found three parties (two restaurants in Zaandam and NEMO Science Museum in Amsterdam) that were interested in serving the meat. And so, she updated the Dutch Arable Farming Union about her plans.“The idea was to serve the meat every other two weeks on a small scale with an informed, yet curious audience, to learn and see what people would think of it.” Ira says. “As it is now, we are not able to give people the chance to be involved in the product. Therefore my goal is to take it from the lab and onto the plate.”But unfortunately, it never came that far.

A prisoner of legislation

A first dinner was scheduled to take place on December 28th, 2017. “But then we found that this was not allowed,” Ira tells us. “I called the Dutch Arable Farming Union, as well as the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality for more information. They told us there was a transitional arrangement that ran until 1 January 2018 - the day that the new European novel foods regulation took effect - and on the 23rd of January, they told me that the idea was off the table.”However, as arrangements had been made, the meat arrived in the Netherlands. “Because I had told the Dutch Arable Farming Union about our plans, they felt the need to inform the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA) about it, who in turn - under the rule of this European legislation - have taken the meat into custody,” Ira says. “It has not been confiscated or taken away, but it is sealed. It’s just laying there now.”[caption id="attachment_81702" align="alignnone" width="640"] The sealed sausage, as documented at NEMO Science Museum.[/caption]“I’m not mad,” Ira says, “I’m worried! We missed a unique opportunity to launch this in the Netherlands, as we were able to deliver in 2017. Politicians are badly informed on this topic matter, and they act upon outdated information. Therefore other countries are now taking the lead in this revolution. Look at Memphis Meats in the US, or Supermeat in Israel. Also China, where the developments on in vitro meat are closely monitored, is interested. And Singapore has been eager to do things for years, but Europe is locked by the Novel foods administration.”“It feels as if I’m being held prisoner in Europe. I find it almost unsafe that the innovations that are needed (and of which I am convinced that they are necessary - I am a very positive person), are being held back under the guise of food and safety in Parma, where the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is established. It’s as if we have put up some sort of a ‘Trump wall’ to put down new ideas and possibilities, letting a lot of interesting and important innovations pass us by.”And it’s exactly this balustrade that led JUST to take the revolution eastwards: The company announced in February it will open its first in vitro meat manufacturing facility in Asia later this year. A big miss for Europe.

In vitro meat is a unique opportunity to reach our climate goals

“It’s a shame that the Netherlands missed out on this due to European legislation!” comments Koert van Mensvoort, joining the conversation. “It’s a unique opportunity to reach our climate goals,” he adds. “We want to excel at innovation and food productivity worldwide. And then this? It’s time we call upon politicians. It’s time for a change.”“Research shows that in vitro meat reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 90% compared to beef, as much less grain, land and water is needed than in traditional agriculture and livestock farming,” he adds.“The people must know about this too,” Ira nods approvingly.Therefore, Next Nature Network launched a petition. A petition for people interested in the developments around, are curious about, and looking to taste the in vitro meat.The goal? Parliamentary questions! The Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority should become an active contributor to innovation by testing the in vitro meat test packages (instead of sealing them) and give people the chance to taste it themselves. Do you agree?Sign the petition if you do - and also want to taste in vitro meat. I sure know I do. [post_title] => How the Dutch government is obstructing the advent of in vitro meat [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interview-ira-van-eelen [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81652 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 122853 [post_author] => 2194 [post_date] => 2019-10-09 16:13:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-09 15:13:23 [post_content] =>

Hello meat lovers! In vitro meat innovator Aleph Farms has taken the saying 'one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind' to a whole new level. The startup has succeeded in producing slaughter-free meat on the international space station (ISS), 339 km away from any natural resources, in one of the most extreme environments imaginable. Let's get you up to speed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-_Zy-arDb0&feature=youtu.be

Didier Toubia, Co-Founder and CEO of Aleph Farms says that the project — a collaboration with 3D Bioprinting technologies (RUS), Meal Source Technologies (US) and Finless Foods (US) — is a “keystone of human achievement” that “marks a significant first step toward achieving our vision to ensure food security for generations to come, while preserving our natural resources.” Put differently, this could have huge implications for the future of our food production.

How does it work?

The beef is produced under highly controlled conditions that mimic the natural process of muscle-tissue regeneration found in cows. 3D bioprinting technology is applied to replicate this process, resulting in the production of nutritious steaks made from in vitro meat cells. This method uses minimal resources and drastically diminishes the need for livestock, water and land.

What are the wider implications?

In September of this year an intergovernmental panel report on climate change, established by the UN, highlighted the hugely damaging effects of animal farming methods on the environment. Indeed, it takes 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of beef, and runoff from factory farms and livestock is one of the leading causes of pollution in rivers and lakes.

Moreover, in the US alone, 56 million acres of land are used to grow feed for animals, while only 4 million acres produce plants for humans to eat. Here we clearly see the huge potential for change when the resources needed to produce meat are dramatically decreased.

This could be a revolutionary possibility for feeding the world’s ever-increasing population - set to reach 10 billion by 2050. This development proves nutritious food can be created anywhere and in the most unlikely of environments. With land disappearing due to rising sea levels and desertification, the possibility of growing food in space could be a gamechanger.

What’s next?

Now we know it's easy to get wrapped up in the excitement of space travel and imagining future solutions for rapidly increasing climate change. However, these technologies may also be essential for addressing current issues on earth where arable land and water is already scarce. Could Aleph farms’ breakthrough provide nutrition for populations that already suffer from food shortages?

Indeed, while technologies of this kind work to ensure future food security, we should consider how they can be implemented as a solution for present day food shortages in areas of the world where a lack of food is not a distant, science-fiction nightmare but a daily reality.

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