9 results for “Intimate Technology series”

How to bingewatch our ‘Intimate Technology’ video series

NextNature.net
March 12th 2019

Technology is coming closer to us. In the form of decades old headphones or state-of-art devices. It has always been a part of our lives and this only seems to develop further: Organ modules are grown from human cells, robots are asking for our attention and intelligent wearables control our emotions.

Technology is coming more and more towards—and inside—our body. Communication between people is also increasingly technologically mediated.

What does it mean for technology to colonize our body?

To explore …

Intimate Technology S01E08: Scroll

NextNature.net
November 28th 2017
The last episode of our Intimate Technology series follows a minute in the life of a hyperconnected family in the digital era.

Intimate Technology S01E07: Our Selves

NextNature.net
November 21st 2017
We think of selfhood as residing in our everyday stream of consciousness. But could we possibly have a second digital self in our online behaviors? Watch episode 3 of our Intimate Technology series.

Intimate Technology S01E06: Also, the Dichotomy of Pragmatism and Perversion

NextNature.net
November 14th 2017
Do we treat our technologies with more care and sentimentality these days than we did in the past?

Intimate Technology S01E05: The Modular Body

NextNature.net
November 7th 2017

The body, like any technology, is made up of countless individual components. Yet, apart from dire medical emergency, have you ever thought about mixing and matching these components, replacing old modules with shiny new upgrades - building a body? In The Modular Body, Floris Kaayk demonstrates what this process might look like.…

Intimate Technology S01E04: So Happy Together

NextNature.net
October 31st 2017
What if you could upload your fondest memories to the cloud? Watch episode 4 of our Intimate Technology video series.

Intimate Technology S01E03: A iReal

NextNature.net
October 24th 2017
What if your devices had a life of their own? Guy Farber’s playful short movie "An iReal" explores this very possibility.

Intimate Technology S01E02: Misbehaving (Ro)bots

NextNature.net
October 17th 2017
"Misbehaving (Ro)bots" asks whether technology could hope to replicate these small bothersome quirks that instill a feeling of intimacy.

Intimate Technology S01E01: All My Clothes

NextNature.net
October 11th 2017
This movie titled "All My Clothes" reminds us of a more straightforward example of intimate technology: the clothes we wear every day.
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Technology is coming closer to us. In the form of decades old headphones or state-of-art devices. It has always been a part of our lives and this only seems to develop further: Organ modules are grown from human cells, robots are asking for our attention and intelligent wearables control our emotions.

Technology is coming more and more towards—and inside—our body. Communication between people is also increasingly technologically mediated.

What does it mean for technology to colonize our body?

To explore such matter, we called upon artists, filmmakers and film enthusiasts around the world to visualize Intimate Technology in a one-minute video.

Resulting in a digital mixtape of 16 films, NNN has found a strong partner in The One Minutes. Together we believe that, through the power of visualization, we can spur debate and capture the current spirit of time. Enjoy!

S01E01 All my clothes
S01E02 Misbehaving (ro)bots
S01E03 An iReal
S01E04 So happy together
S01E05 The modular body
S01E06 Also, the dichotomy of pragmatism and perversion
S01E07 Our selves
S01E08 Scroll

Rather watch the full thing at once? Then head to Youtube.

[post_title] => How to bingewatch our ‘Intimate Technology’ video series [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bingewatch-intimate-technology-series [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-12 18:44:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-12 17:44:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=109319 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78798 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-11-28 10:00:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-28 08:00:10 [post_content] => Nowadays we spend a lot of our time scrolling through digital timelines, tapping and swiping on screens. Such behavior is so ingrained that we forget the older technologies these actions are meant to emulate. Swiping no longer reminds us of turning the page of a book. We tap on digital keyboards without thinking for a moment about typewriters. Scrolling certainly no longer recalls actual scrolls. Digital rituals meant to recall their analog forebears are second nature to us now, but in his movie Scroll, Daniel Sánchez brings our relationship with these rituals vividly back to life.The video follows a minute in the life of a hyperconnected family in the digital era. Every family member has their own device which fully occupies their attention. The father receives notifications about his high school reunion. The young boy Samuel sends emoji-filled messages to his school friend. His sister uploads selfies and watches approval flood in, until Samuel snaps an unflattering picture of her and tags her without permission.In Sánchez’s tech-saturated vision of postmodernity, little has really changed about the dynamics of family life. Kids still chat with their school friends. Their elders still try to reconnect with old ones. Siblings still squabble and tease one another. All this may now be accomplished through digital interfaces, but the reasons and feelings involved have hardly changed. And the video ends with a quiet moment which reminds us where all these digital gestures originated from. While her siblings fight in the next room, the youngest daughter taps and swipes on a picture frame showing a photo of the family, achieving no response. The metaphor has come full circle.Is family life radically changed by the presence of new technologies, or does it simply adapt? What do you make of the intimate rituals we perform with our technologies? Does our intuitive understanding of new tech rely on analogies to old ones?[youtube]https://youtu.be/bcnvQdYJJrs[/youtube]Credit: Scroll, by Daniel Sánchez (CO)______________And that's a wrap! The first season of our Intimate Technology series has come to an end. Missed an episode? Or do you want to immerse yourself once more in the entire series? Scroll through our web archive here. [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E08: Scroll [post_excerpt] => The last episode of our Intimate Technology series follows a minute in the life of a hyperconnected family in the digital era. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-s01e08 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78798/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78687 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-11-21 10:00:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-21 08:00:01 [post_content] => In the modern world, our identities are intimately tied to our technologies. We think of selfhood as residing in our everyday stream of consciousness. But could we possibly have a second digital self in our online behaviors? In their film Our Selves - An Imaginary Dialogue Between Brainwaves and Smartphones, Gianmaria Vernetti and Elisa Troglia reflect on the relationship between these two selves.On the left side of the screen, the video presents the human mind as a simple digital interface. Thoughts flash across the top of the monitor, ranging from the mundane (“I should not waste time on Facebook”, “No more emails today”, “Selfie”) to the vulnerable and beautiful (“Feel sad”, “Inner self”, “Autumn leaves”). Beneath this, the interface tracks frustration and excitement as numerical values. Meanwhile on the right side, the text cycles through smartphone commands: “Established Internet”, “Established Facebook”.At first these two streams do not interact - but the title suggests we are here for a dialogue. As the movie progresses the streams indeed begin to interact in quite poignant ways. Amid the continuing techno-babble, the words “I’ll be with you" briefly flash up on the smartphone side of the screen.What do you make of Vernetti and Troglia’s film? Do you recognize your own thoughts and moods in it, or your own mode of interaction with technology? Is the movie a parable of loneliness in the postmodern world, or simply a reflection of our new hyperconnected way of being?[youtube]https://youtu.be/2TDFyJOiaNQ[/youtube]Credit: Our Selves - An Imaginary Dialogue Between Brainwaves and Smartphones by Gianmaria Vernetti and Elisa Troglia (IT) [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E07: Our Selves [post_excerpt] => We think of selfhood as residing in our everyday stream of consciousness. But could we possibly have a second digital self in our online behaviors? Watch episode 3 of our Intimate Technology series. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-s01e07 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78687/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78554 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-11-14 10:21:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-14 08:21:47 [post_content] => Not only our technology itself, but also the way we interact with it varies and evolves over time. Do we treat our technologies with more care and sentimentality these days than we did in the past? In her short film Also, the Dichotomy of Pragmatism and Perversion, Tiziana Kruger examines the question through an unusually old-fashioned object: a simple rug.Usually, when we discuss our (over)attachment to technology, we think of ultramodern tech. We say that we consider our smartphones as something similar to pets or companions, than mere tools. Or that virtual reality may have the potential to replace our real-world connections. And so on. But perhaps we are forgetting that, in a way, it was always like this. The farmer at the dawn of agriculture could have had a favourite scythe. The medieval knight certainly had a great attachment to his shield and armor. We have for a long time taken pride in the tidiness and tasteful décor of our homes.To remind us of this, Kruger flips the script. Her video shows a simple yet unusual scene: a hand holding a comb, carefully combing the fringe of a rug. The tender act of care becomes something strange to watch when applied to a technology we usually pay little attention to. We think rugs are made to stay under our feet, they are not objects of affection. Yet the movie reminds us that technology is a very broad category. When we talk about intimate technology, we are not necessarily talking about something new, but something very old indeed.Do you think that technological advancement has deepened our attachment to what used to be simple tools? Or is this just part of a very old phenomena? And as the title asks, is an attachment to objects above people necessarily “perverse”?[youtube]https://youtu.be/wDxFOEb5zIs[/youtube]Credit: Also, the Dichotomy of Pragmatism and Perversion by Tiziana Kruger (DE) [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E06: Also, the Dichotomy of Pragmatism and Perversion [post_excerpt] => Do we treat our technologies with more care and sentimentality these days than we did in the past? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-s01e06 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78554/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78398 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-11-07 13:19:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-07 11:19:23 [post_content] => The body, like any technology, is made up of countless individual components. Yet, apart from dire medical emergency, have you ever thought about mixing and matching these components, replacing old modules with shiny new upgrades - building a body? In The Modular Body, Floris Kaayk demonstrates what this process might look like.The protagnoist of the video, OSCAR, is a prototype designed by the fictional biologist Cornelis Vlasman to demonstrate the possibilities of the body as a modular system. When a limb is lost, it can be already replaced with a prosthetic which may even outperform the original. People unhappy with their appearance nowasays have the option of surgically altering the parts they don’t like. But overall, science still views the body as a “closed system”. A body designed from the outset to be modular would radically change this view. We might start switching out parts, and the consequences for medicine would be enormous.Yet, the movie leaves us to puzzle over the wider implications of the technology ourselves. What we see instead is the very intimate physical process of assembling OSCAR. The image of the body’s central module, the heart, comes into focus as the microscope is adjusted and repositioned. Delicate instruments slot the power module into place with a satisfying click, and the heart begins to beat. As more modules are added, next to the sound of the heart monitor we can hear the excited talk of the doctors assembling this modular body. Here is technology at its most intimate, delicate and satisfying version to work with.How might a modular body impact the world of medical science? Is a modular body compatible with our concept of intimacy? What would the ability to redesign the body on a whim mean to you?[youtube]https://youtu.be/t5cf5jUw-j0[/youtube]Credit: The Modular Body by Floris Kaayk (NL) [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E05: The Modular Body [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-modular-body [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78398/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78194 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-10-31 10:00:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-31 08:00:53 [post_content] => What if you could upload your fondest memories to the cloud, delete those you don’t want anymore, make a highlight reel of the best days of your life? This is the future that Benedikt Wöppel envisions in“So Happy Together”.Wöppel’s film takes the form of an advert for Google’s (imaginary) new product: The Mind Uploader G9, a device that allows us to archive, curate, search and delete our memories on a whim. Such a technology would have many implications. It could become a new feature in our daily lives. Nowadays, we do not consider remembering a real activity in our lives; it is something that happens passively. But with a Mind Uploader, we might deliberately schedule time with our memories into our daily routine.1-2 pm: relive childhood. Nevertheless, memory is among the most intimate features of our minds. Many of us would think twice before surrendering it to technology.If you had a Mind Uploader, what would you do with it? You could dip into happier times when you feel down, or delete anything disturbing or embarrassing in order to feel better about yourself. Such a device could make you happier in your day-to-day life, or it could simply distract you. These are the issues Wöppel’s thought-provoking film brings vividly to life.Do you forget things you ought to remember, or remember experiences you would like to forget? Would you buy a Mind Uploader if you could?[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_OcCRny5ZM[/youtube]
Credit: So Happy Together by Benedikt Wöppel (DE).
[post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E04: So Happy Together [post_excerpt] => What if you could upload your fondest memories to the cloud? Watch episode 4 of our Intimate Technology video series. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-happy-together [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78194/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77509 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-10-24 10:00:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-24 08:00:43 [post_content] => Imagine if your devices could have their own life: after a hard day facilitating your social life, your iPhone simply does not go to sleep, but ventures out to hold intimate conversations with its own peers. Guy Farber’s playful short movie "A iReal" explores this very possibility.We increasingly think of our handheld devices as part of the family; they recognise us, talk to us, know our habits. But rarely we consider what our phones and tablets, defined by their ability to communicate for us, might have to say for themselves if they had the chance. Your iPhone might gossip about your social life. Your Kindle might be quietly judging your reading habits (Harry Potter, again?).Or it might not be about you at all. In Farber’s interpretation, the devices gather not to talk about their owner behind his back or plot an iPhone rebellion, but to discuss their feelings. The precocious phones of "A iReal" communicate in uncannily human ways. They make eye contact with their video cameras, shuffle closer to each other across the desk, and talk in both visual text and small robotic voices. “I love you” says one. “I love you too” replies the other. Romeo and Juliet become Samsung and iPhone - a digital romance.Farber’s film makes us think about how far we have gone in humanizing our technologies. Does your phone have a sentimental value beyond its functionality? Do our devices get to be intimate too?[youtube]https://youtu.be/kTO6c1qNN50[/youtube]Credit: A iReal by Guy Farber (UK)______________________________This article is part of the "HUBOT weeks" to contextualize our latest project HUBOT, the job agency for people and robots. Want to learn more about this project? Join NNN and we will keep you posted! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E03: A iReal [post_excerpt] => What if your devices had a life of their own? Guy Farber’s playful short movie "An iReal" explores this very possibility. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-ireal [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77509/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77503 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-10-17 10:00:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-17 08:00:17 [post_content] => What does intimacy mean? Sometimes it can mean little annoyances: a partner disturbing your sleep, a pet biting your hand, a child doing anything to draw your attention. In her video "Misbehaving (Ro)bots", Nicole Pérez asks whether technology could hope to replicate these small bothersome quirks that instill a feeling of intimacy.The narrator of the film speaks lovingly of “her” - his lover. We come to learn that she is not a human, but a collection of small robots designed to simulate the intimacy of a partner sleeping in his bed. Not sexually but, you might say, romantically. The robots poke and prod the narrator, and he even finds them annoying. But the tender attention amounts to a feeling of loving intimacy. It might remind us of the movie "Her", in which a man falls in love with his phone’s talking operating system. But Pérez’s robots are something more physical, they simulate the lover’s touch, not her voice or mind."Misbehaving (Ro)bots" is thought-provoking on two levels. It asks us, firstly, to think about the future. How do we feel about the idea of being intimate with a mechanical robot? Whether we find the lovers’ tale romantic or disturbing, it might be important if such technological love become common in the future. Secondly, Pérez invites us to think about the theme of intimacy itself. In her video, after all, intimacy is not intellectual or spiritual, but rather habitual and physical.Do we become intimate with someone not when we know their deepest thoughts, but rather when we get used to their most annoying quirks? Can technology hope to replicate this feeling? Pérez’s film makes us reflect on intimacy as it is, and as it might be.[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_H3RQjetiVI[/youtube]Credit: Misbehaving (Ro)Bots by Nicole Perez (US)______________________________This article is part of the "HUBOT weeks" to contextualize our latest project HUBOT, the job agency for people and robots. Want to learn more about this project? Join NNN and we will keep you posted! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E02: Misbehaving (Ro)bots [post_excerpt] => "Misbehaving (Ro)bots" asks whether technology could hope to replicate these small bothersome quirks that instill a feeling of intimacy. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-misbehaving-robots [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:08:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:08:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77503/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77777 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-10-11 10:00:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-11 08:00:24 [post_content] => What does intimate technology mean to you? Probably the word "intimate" makes you think about sex and personal relationships, while "technology" suggests modern inventions and designs. In his video "All My Clothes", Rick van de Dood reminds us of a more straightforward example of intimate technology: the clothes we wear every day.We have worn clothes since we first donned bearskins as cavemen, and yet we usually don’t put much thought, care, or attention into our choices. We pull a shirt on at the beginning of the day, we roll our socks into a ball, we hide our clothing away in a closet. Clothes, so closely in contact with our bodies, are an intimate technology we rarely think of as intimate."All My Clothes" puts these everyday objects in a very different light. We see clothes - not luxurious accessories and dresses, but the clothes we wear for ordinary work and leisure - floating against an idyllic sky-blue background. Spinning and twirling through the sky, the clothes separated from their owners appear to be dancing. Their movements are different form the movements of the humans who usually wear them, but are expressive in their own way. We begin to think of this most intimate technology, not only as a collection of functional objects, but also as freely creative and independent.How does van de Dood’s movie make you feel? Are there other intimate technologies that, separated from the user, seem to take on a life of their own? Watch the video below.[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9t_8iean1w[/youtube]Credit: All My Clothes by Rick van de Dood (NL) [post_title] => Intimate Technology S01E01: All My Clothes [post_excerpt] => This movie titled "All My Clothes" reminds us of a more straightforward example of intimate technology: the clothes we wear every day. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => intimate-technology-ep-1-clothes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-03 14:09:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-03 13:09:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77777/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 9 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 109319 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2019-03-12 18:33:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-12 17:33:30 [post_content] =>

Technology is coming closer to us. In the form of decades old headphones or state-of-art devices. It has always been a part of our lives and this only seems to develop further: Organ modules are grown from human cells, robots are asking for our attention and intelligent wearables control our emotions.

Technology is coming more and more towards—and inside—our body. Communication between people is also increasingly technologically mediated.

What does it mean for technology to colonize our body?

To explore such matter, we called upon artists, filmmakers and film enthusiasts around the world to visualize Intimate Technology in a one-minute video.

Resulting in a digital mixtape of 16 films, NNN has found a strong partner in The One Minutes. Together we believe that, through the power of visualization, we can spur debate and capture the current spirit of time. Enjoy!

S01E01 All my clothes
S01E02 Misbehaving (ro)bots
S01E03 An iReal
S01E04 So happy together
S01E05 The modular body
S01E06 Also, the dichotomy of pragmatism and perversion
S01E07 Our selves
S01E08 Scroll

Rather watch the full thing at once? Then head to Youtube.

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