338 results for “Made-to-debate”

Call for movies: Which movie deserves a spot in the sequal to the Next Nature movie top 10?

NextNature.net
February 7th 2019

Sequels and prequels appear in our cinemas every day but somehow we haven’t had a follow-up to our infamous Next Nature movie top 10 that fully deserves the “sequel treatment”.

Allow us to refresh your memory:

1. Quest for Fire / La Guerre du Feu (1981)
2. Being There (1979)
3. Koyaansiqatsi (1983)
4. Blade Runner (1984)
5. American Beauty (1999)
6.The Matrix (1999)
7. Grizzly Man (2005)
8. Avatar (2009)
9. The Terminal (2004)
10. Idiocracy (2006)

Thus our …

Genetically engineered plants do it better

NextNature.net
January 11th 2019

Welcome to the conversation! Every week, we’ll open up a new conversation among members of the network about next nature topics we've encountered around the globe. We hope Nextnature.net can serve as a thrilling platform for dialogue among our authors, members, and anyone interested in exploring the next nature with us. On behalf of the editorial team, welcome. – Koert van Mensvoort

What happened Genetic engineers in Illinois have designed super-size tobacco plants that grow as much as 40% larger …

‘Listen’ to your genetic heritage: Curate a playlist based on your DNA

Ruben Baart
September 27th 2018

Genealogy services have exploded over the past few years, and Spotify is capitalizing on the boom by providing curated playlist based on users’ DNA. Here's what you should know.

If you could listen to your DNA, what would it sound like?…

Interview: Designer Shahar Livne is geomimicing the future of plastics

Kelly Streekstra
April 18th 2018

What if plastics one day become a rare commodity that we desire and mine from the depths of the earth’s crust? By that time, plastic would be a rather different material. Shahar Livne offers a fast-forward to this next nature, by artificially geomimicing metamorphisms. She shares with us her speculative material: the “lithoplast”.

The return of Rayfish Footwear?

NextNature.net
February 23rd 2018

Rayfish Footwear was a fictional company that offered personalized sneakers crafted from genetically modified stingray leather. This online science fiction story allowed customers to grow and design their own sneaker from a genetically modified fish, to question our (often all too consumptive) relationship with animals. Now, the company fiction is back: Catch Rayfish as part of FAKE at the Science Gallery in Dublin.…

The Smell of Global Economy

Elle Zhan Wei
August 2nd 2017
The Pollution Pods installation replicates the smell and air quality of five different urban environments, forming the smell of a global economy.

Step Inside the Next Nature Habitat

NextNature.net
January 20th 2017
Discover the Next Nature Habitat VR experience, and explore four future environments for humans to live in.

Begging Ghetto Blasters Hack the System

Ingmar Nieuweboer
June 10th 2016
Begging ghetto blasters in Utrecht are making you question poverty.

If a Robot Buys XTC on the Dark Web, Who is Responsible?

Alexandra Bremers
October 2nd 2015
The Random Darknet Shopper, with bitcoin to burn, has purchased counterfeit jeans, master keys, dodgy cigs and even a bag of ecstasy tablets. Who is legally liable?

Hacking And Controlling Cars Remotely

Robin Bergman
July 24th 2015
Two American hackers have been working on hacking cars to takeover full control of vehicles.
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Sequels and prequels appear in our cinemas every day but somehow we haven’t had a follow-up to our infamous Next Nature movie top 10 that fully deserves the “sequel treatment”.

Allow us to refresh your memory:

1. Quest for Fire / La Guerre du Feu (1981)
2. Being There (1979)
3. Koyaansiqatsi (1983)
4. Blade Runner (1984)
5. American Beauty (1999)
6.The Matrix (1999)
7. Grizzly Man (2005)
8. Avatar (2009)
9. The Terminal (2004)
10. Idiocracy (2006)

Thus our carefully crafted, not updated yet timeless, always debatable and incomplete list of the ten next nature movies for you to watch.

Now, our top 10 is getting a sequal series, many years on from its completion after bingewatching (ahem, working) for the sake of research.

Is there a movie (2010-present) of which you think deserves a spot in the Next Nature movie top 10, part two? Share your suggestions in the comments below ?

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Welcome to the conversation! Every week, we’ll open up a new conversation among members of the network about next nature topics we've encountered around the globe. We hope Nextnature.net can serve as a thrilling platform for dialogue among our authors, members, and anyone interested in exploring the next nature with us. On behalf of the editorial team, welcome. – Koert van Mensvoort

What happened Genetic engineers in Illinois have designed super-size tobacco plants that grow as much as 40% larger than usual by tweaking the process that plants use to turn sunlight into food.
Why tobacco? Researchers work with tobacco because it grows quickly and is easy to genetically modify. The team is now making similar gene changes to potatoes, soybeans, and cowpeas.
Greener than you think In the US alone, average crop yields are only 20% of those produced during bumper crop seasons when conditions are ‘ideal’. In other words, during a typical growing season 80% of our food production is lost to pathogens and environmental stress. Genetically engineered plants have already solved some of these problems in an environmentally friendly way.
The bad news While the research is being conducted in the US, the EU has established a rather protectionist legal framework that puts the development of modern biotechnology, and more specifically of GMOs, on hold.
Societal debate A recent survey shows that fear of GMOs is increasing. Researchers believe it could take 20 years to get the new crops approved by regulators. However, reclaiming even a percentage of crop loss across the world would go a long way to meeting the 21st century’s rapidly expanding food demands, so it's certainly worth having a discussion about. Feel free to share your knowledge, thoughts and viewpoints with us in the Contribute section! ?

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Genealogy services have exploded over the past few years, and Spotify is capitalizing on the boom by providing curated playlist based on users’ DNA. Here's what you should know.

If you could listen to your DNA, what would it sound like?

This weekend Spotify announced it has partnered with the world’s largest for-profit genealogy company, AncestryDNA, to launch a new feature which curates your own personal playlist based on your DNA. These genetically-curated playlists will link your Spotify account to your DNA test results, combining the music streaming platform’s personalized recommendations with 'top tracks' based on your genetic heritage.

All you have to do is to sign up for the genealogy platform, send in your saliva sample, and the DNA dealer will input the data into Spotify’s musical generator, which will simply select the playlist with historic music from the countries that feature in your DNA results.

That’s right, thanks to the modern miracle of corporate synergy, you can let your $99 AncestryDNA info dictate a custom clutch of tunes for your next road trip. But what's really at stake here?

The lucrative rise of DNA testing

For centuries, genealogists have relied on oral and written records to trace their family trees. But around the turn of the millennium, the age of DIY genetics testing took off and a growth industry was born. Today industry estimates suggest that roughly 1 in 25 adult Americans have access to their genetic data.

Sure, on the one hand this provided genealogists and family historians with an opportunity to use well-established scientific methods to prove relationships and ancestry, but on the other hand, it created a marketplace.

Make no mistake, this market is expected to be worth £261m by 2022 and is being applied to a broad spectrum of sectors including ancestry, health, beauty, and dating. Some firms in America even provide DNA testing for pets, so dog owners can pinpoint the exact breed makeup of their four-legged friend.

It’s a market largely dominated by large firms, such as AncestryDNA, which last year announced they’d reached four million users on their database, and 23andMe, backed by Facebook billionaire Yuri Milner and Google Ventures. But what about the security implications…

Is DNA the new data?

The public’s fascination with ancestry has led to a boom in businesses specialising in DNA, but it requires the transfer of sensitive information: your genetic data.

The rise of consumer genetics tests has brought up a number of privacy concerns, since they deal with information that’s fundamental and unique to every individual. It poses the question: When you spit into a tube and submit your sample, who has access to that information - and who ultimately owns your DNA?

Therefore it’s important to get a clear picture of who owns that information and who will be able to see it. I mean, we are good at clicking ‘agree’ and not reading the terms of service, right? From there, it’s a matter of how far such terms go.

Then there’s also the question of what it truly means to trust a tech company like Spotify to recommend songs based on your genetic origins, or how DNA could get shared with other companies without your consent.

The fact is, we don’t know how our genetic sequence will be used in the years to come, who will be able to access it, and on what terms. Who knows, in the near future, DNA may be the hottest new currency around.

So for now, you may consider holding off on sharing yours.

[post_title] => 'Listen' to your genetic heritage: Curate a playlist based on your DNA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => spotify-playlist-dna [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 17:41:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 16:41:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91224 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81354 [post_author] => 1510 [post_date] => 2018-04-18 11:35:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-18 10:35:27 [post_content] => What if plastics one day become a rare commodity that we desire and mine from the depths of the earth’s crust? By that time, plastic would be a rather different material. Shahar Livne offers a fast-forward to this next nature, by artificially geomimicing metamorphisms. She shares with us her speculative material: the “lithoplast”.We sat down with Shahar Livne, an Israeli-born designer who graduated from the Design Academy in Eindhoven. This week, she is showcasing her work at the Milan Design week. We spoke about her research into metamorphism as a design tool, and how this led her to envision the future of plastics. 

Material narratives through metamorphism

“I’m a material designer. I’m interested in the philosophical and cultural aspects of materials. I aim to use them to tell a story.” One of the many materials that may tell a story, are rocks. “Over time, rocks go through a lot of transformations inside the Earth.” One of these transformations, is metamorphism. “This is a natural process, resulting in natural rocks, through which I am uniquely able to tell a story.”The Earth’s history is told by the rock-layering of the earth’s crust. Humanity is uniquely present in that story, by leaving a global mark on our technosphere. The most prominent material-marker of humanity, are plastics.[caption id="attachment_81355" align="alignnone" width="640"] A lithoplast rock made by Shahar Livne[/caption]

Exploring plastics

“Plastic is the first man-made material that we have changed on a molecular level. Plastics are made from the natural material of oil, and were developed to imitate and enhance nature." “I drew upon an essay by Koert van Mensvoort, and was particularly inspired by the concept of Hypernature. I think plastic is a hypernatural material. With plastics, we’re able to model and control nature.”Plastics are made to be durable, and may survive much longer than we had imagined. There is no place in the world that is free from plastics anymore.” Despite our efforts of recycling, and cleaning up the oceans, plastics will most likely be a future fossil. Shahar dares to accept this scenario and explores what this future may look like.
"Plastic is a hypernatural material"
Nature is already taking plastic into itself. At some point, plastic hybridized with natural materials.” The first example of this hybrid material, are ‘plastic conglomerates’. These are nature-made-rocks that harbor pieces of plastic within them. These have gone through the earliest stages of the rock-cycle, similar to the process by which dead shellfish pressurize into limestone, making up the iconic white cliffs of England. However, it's possible that materials like rock or plastic stay within the earth’s crust for longer. This is when the natural process of metamorphism takes place. Under high pressures and temperatures, limestone may turn into marble, or charcoal turns into diamonds.“I wondered, could plastics last through the full rock-cycle? So, I started talking to geologists. They agreed that our plastics will most probably one day be metamorphosed.”“That vision of the future, is what grasped me. That’s how I got to my speculative material version of the future. A newly created material: the lithoplast.”
"Nature is already taking plastic into itself. At some point, plastic hybridized with natural materials"
[caption id="attachment_81362" align="alignnone" width="640"] Shahar shares: “I had never expected that people would be so eager to touch the lithoplasts. The moment they pick it up their faces are almost always fully surprised. People expect a heavy material like a stone, but plastic is a lot lighter.”[/caption]

Presenting the future of plastics

“To make the lithoplast, I’m geomimicing something that doesn’t happen in nature just yet.”“In natural settings, I expect that all kinds of plastics will metamorphose together with other minerals. To mimic this, I mix the plastics with minestone and marble dust. This distinguishes my method from 3D printing, where you can only use certain types of plastics and have to divide them yourself.”“To mimic metamorphism, I have access to a huge press. This machine can expose my mix to such high pressures and temperatures that the material completely changes. The material stretches, and becomes malleable.”Malleability is a celebrated characteristic of plastics; you can make it into any form you like. “However, the timespan for molding plastics in traditional methods, industrial plastics and 3D printers, only lasts a few seconds. This time-frame makes plastic inherently a machine-made material.”
"In the future, we may rediscover this beautiful material of our wasted plastics, and start mining them"
“What I discovered, is that through my method of metamorphism, the lithoplast stays malleable for much longer. We think this happens due to the mixture I use.  This unique aspect allows me to mold the material by hand - as if it is clay. This interaction with the material, is much more like craftmanship.” Her next-material may envision a goldsmith of the future: the plastic smith!Her work envisions a more positive view on our waste culture. “What I think will happen, is that we will reach a point where we won’t be able to make plastics anymore. At that point, we may rediscover this beautiful material of our wasted plastics, and start mining them.”“When I tell people that I’m not recycling plastics, but envisioning a far future with fossilized plastics in it, some people may get angry. I think that makes sense: many of us put a lot of effort into recycling our plastics, we simply don’t want to see our plastic waste become a part of nature. I want people to start thinking differently about plastics, on a larger timescale.”[caption id="attachment_81363" align="alignnone" width="640"] The malleability of the lithoplasts, allows Shahar to hand-make objects, like a craftsman.[/caption]

Milan design week

Shahar is excited to present her work during Milan design week. She’ll be doing two exhibitions as part of her metamorphism research. “Firstly, I’m invited by the organization of Ventura Future to exhibit in their collection on future materials and technologies. Here, I will be treating the lithoplasts like clay, and make vases with them, that either are ‘rough’ or really ‘fine’. So, the vases change in meaning from looking really natural to looking really synthetic.”“I’m also exhibiting with Dutch Invirtuals, a design collective. One of their exhibits is exploring the future of mining, and is part of the exhibition “Mutant Matter”. Here I will present the lithoplast like altars, to illustrate the idea that we could also be worshipping plastics instead of wasting them.”

The future of the lithoplast

In the future, Shahar hopes to publish her research on metamorphism in book form. Her graduation research will be a part of this. “This research will explore our perceptions on the natural-born and man-made, our cultural uses of plastics, and I’ll research the idea of craftsmanship.” Her favorite part of her designs, lies in the dialogue it invites. “I'm now developing a methodology on material research and design, whilst doing my residency at the ‘materials experience lab’ at TU Delft. I realized that what I like most about my materials such as the lithoplasts, is how I can ask people lots of questions with it.”“One of my favorite questions I like to ask people about my work is: 'If we are natural, and we are making plastic, then is plastic not a natural material?' Think about it.Thank you Shahar Livne, for sharing your viewpoints with us! We are looking forward to your exhibit in Milan, and the many more next-materials you may make. [post_title] => Interview: Designer Shahar Livne is geomimicing the future of plastics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interview-shahar-livne [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-20 10:53:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-20 09:53:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81354 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 80585 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-02-23 11:16:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-02-23 10:16:26 [post_content] => Rayfish Footwear was a fictional company that offered personalized sneakers crafted from genetically modified stingray leather. This online science fiction story allowed customers to grow and design their own sneaker from a genetically modified fish, to question our (often all too consumptive) relationship with animals. Now, the company fiction is back: Catch Rayfish as part of FAKE at the Science Gallery in Dublin.

A phoney faux-pas expo?

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Science Gallery Dublin, known for being one of the most creative, innovative and artistic venues in Ireland: A place where science, art, technology and design collide, unleashing their combined creative potential.

What to expect at FAKE? You will be challenged to look at the theme of ‘fake’ from both positive and negative perspectives. From biomimicry to forged documents, and from fake meat to scandals and fake emotions. Expect yourself to question when is "authenticity considered essential, copying cool, and what is the boundary between a phoney faux-pas and a really fantastic FAKE," thus the curator writes.

This makes us wonder, how do we perceive what’s fake from what’s real? In the case of Rayfish Footwear, one of our first projects here at NNN, the truth about it being fake took a little while to come out.

An online science fiction story...

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="640"] Visitors of the Rayfish website could grow their own sneaker with the online design tool: www.rayfish.com[/caption]

As you may remember, the launch of Rayfish Footwear back in 2012 raised a considerable debate on new biotechnologies, and questioned our – often all too consumptive – relationship with animals. With the creation of this fictional startup, we aimed to make that discussion tangible in a concrete product, a customized stingray leather sneaker, which consumers could either love or hate.

The promise was simple: Grow your own stingray with a pattern that you design. After a good life in the fishfarm, your fish is turned into a biocustomized sneaker.

While almost ten thousand people had designed their own fish sneaker on the Rayfish website, showing their desire for a biocustomized sneaker; almost the same amount of people had protested against the company, resulting in an intense discussion on the consumptive use of animals in our society.

[caption id="attachment_80660" align="alignnone" width="634"] A selection of customer-made sneakers.[/caption]

The Rise and Fall of Rayfish Footwear

During those days, the startup received lots of attention from prominent media, such as Wired, Huffington Post, among others, a fact that definitely contributed to further catalyze the debate. Rayfish seemed bound for success at the beginning, however, after animal rights activists broke into the company and released all the fishes in the ocean, Rayfish started struggling to find new investors. These series of events eventually led to more people questioning how legitimate this story was.

Not long after that, the fictional startup declared its bankruptcy and the true objective of the company was revealed in a ‘making of video’ titled "The Rise and Fall of Rayfish Footwear". This short documentary gave an overview of the entire project, its impact and the motivation of the makers to create this fictional story. Watch it here: [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGV4wxHRDKo[/youtube]FAKE runs from March 1st until June 3rd at Science Gallery in Dublin._________________________Your project on this website? Join the network!  [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The return of Rayfish Footwear? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => rayfish-footwear [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=80585 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75896 [post_author] => 1324 [post_date] => 2017-08-02 20:30:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-02 18:30:23 [post_content] => Have you ever wondered how a global economy smells like? British artist Michael Pinsky, in collaboration with Climart, built the Pollution Pods, an installation that replicates the smell and air quality of different urban environments.By using a carefully mixed elements that are present in the air of each chosen location, they recreated the smell of some of the most polluted cities in the world: Beijing, New Delhi, Sao Paulo, London and Oslo. The choice of these five cities is a strategic one: global economy."Much of this pollution is driven by the insatiable appetite of capitalist consumerism. Whilst we here in the developed world live in an environment with relatively clean air, people in countries such as China and India are being poisoned by the air borne toxins created from industries fulfilling orders from the West", the project description explains. This difference is how our global economy smells like. The five pollution pods are interconnected, visitors move from one pod to the next through short corridors to highlight the interrelation of these global eco-systems. The difference from the extremely polluted New Delhi pod to the clean Oslo pod is made clear to visitors, with the aim of raising awareness and evoking a reaction.The installation sends the message that developing countries aren't the only ones to blame for the damage done to our planet. Even though they are the ones producing the pollutants, it is a global episode in which each country plays its part. Eventually, no one stays untouched from the influence of climate change.Sources: Climart [post_title] => The Smell of Global Economy [post_excerpt] => The Pollution Pods installation replicates the smell and air quality of five different urban environments, forming the smell of a global economy. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => smell-of-global-economy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-07 10:55:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-07 08:55:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=75896/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70215 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-01-20 11:28:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-20 10:28:30 [post_content] => The natural habitat of the polar bear is the Arctic. The natural habitat of the scorpion is the desert. How about humans? What is our natural habitat? And what does it mean to live in a next nature? Discover it with the Next Nature Habitat VR, our immersive experience to travel through different environments where we might live in someday. Will machines take over, just like they did with the Internet or global finance? Or will we go back to live like our ancestors, in close harmony with nature and gathering food to survive? And what if we existed in a fully simulated reality, could we endure such a artificial place? Try to answer these questions and join the discussion on our possible future habitat. Step inside... [post_title] => Step Inside the Next Nature Habitat [post_excerpt] => Discover the Next Nature Habitat VR experience, and explore four future environments for humans to live in. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => whats-next-nature-habitat [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-10 12:58:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-10 11:58:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70215 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 64160 [post_author] => 869 [post_date] => 2016-06-10 14:00:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-10 12:00:54 [post_content] => In the city of Utrecht, the Netherlands, something strange is going on. Since a couple of years begging is prohibited there. The beggars were seen as a nuisance, disrupting the picturesque atmosphere of the old city center. Today, however, begging voices are echoing through the streets again. But this time it’s not homeless people, but ghetto blasters that do the begging.Songs for Thomas Piketty is an art project part of Hacking Habitat, an art manifestation that aims to empower the expression of individuals in public spaces. The public space should be a reflection of society, not a polished, one-sided version of it. Our everyday life is colonized and infiltrated by corporate and governmental systems under the guise of safety and risk aversion. Hacking Habitat poses the question: how can we keep ownership of our lives?gettoblaster with saucer begging for changeThomas Piketty makes us realize with his book Capital in the Twenty-First Century how the income-gap between the rich and the poor will only increase in the years to come. Songs for Thomas Piketty confronts us with the reality. The begging voices demand your attention. They make you feel uncomfortable and give a sense of urgency. The ghetto blasters ‘hack’ the system in this way and pose questions such as: do we need to see the poor in order to discuss poverty? And do we feel more empathy for a machine than for the human being it represents?Source: Europe by People. Image: Dries Verhoeven [post_title] => Begging Ghetto Blasters Hack the System [post_excerpt] => Begging ghetto blasters in Utrecht are making you question poverty. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => begging-gettoblasters-hacking-system [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-06-15 15:26:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-06-15 13:26:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=64160 [menu_order] => 214 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 57189 [post_author] => 861 [post_date] => 2015-10-02 22:44:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-10-02 20:44:47 [post_content] => The Random Darknet Shopper was an algorithm shopping on the Dark Web. Provided with a budget of $100 in Bitcoins per week, it selected one random item from deep web shop Agora and had it shipped to Switzerland to its makers, !Mediengruppe Bitnik. From counterfeit jeans and hidden camera baseball caps, to a passport scan and a Visa platinum card, everything was collected and put together in an exhibition that took place at the end of 2014. But there was one problem: on one of its shopping sprees the robot ordered a bag of Ecstasy pills.parcel_xts_04_905"Today, we received the 10 Ecstasy Pills which the Random Darknet Shopper bought last week. The pills were vacuum-sealed in aluminium foil and placed inside a DVD case, so they would look like a DVD in a x-ray scan" the artists wrote.The package with drugs was added along with 11 other purchases to the exhibition Dark Net - From Memes to Onionland, which opened on October 18th, 2014 and ran successfully for three months at Kunst Halle St. Gallen. But on the 12th of January, the day after the exhibition was closed, the work was confiscated by the public prosecutor's office of St. Gallen and all the purchases and the bot itself were taken away. The reason was said to be to prevent the pills from ending up in the hands of a third party.The event brought some complicated issues to light concerning liability in the case of bots. Can a piece of software be jailed for a crime, or should the makers be held responsible? We might think immediately about the person who programmed the bot to do it, but what will happen when artificial intelligence becomes increasingly functional?In the case of the Random Darknet Shopper the objects and the bot were released after three months, but the Ecstasy pills were destroyed. The artists were declared free of charge from illegal drug possession, since the effects of the questions raised by the artwork justified the drugs being exhibited as artefacts.“We are the legal owner of the drugs – we are responsible for everything the bot does, as we executed the code", Domagoj Smoljo - one of the makers - told to The Guardian. “But our lawyer and the Swiss constitution says art in the public interest is allowed to be free”.The aim of the project was to explore ethical implications of this kind of markets. Apart from that, trust was another topic the project aimed to explore. It is curious how trust exists between two anonymous parties around a commercial transaction of goods that are possibly illegal. According to Smoljo, the markets used similar procedures such as Ebay and Amazon's ratings and feedback systems. All the twelve items ordered arrived and for one cancelled trade the paid Bitcoins were returned.10x_yellow_Twitter_120mg_mdma_gVwpYKG6D8_540According to the makers, the project has opened up just the tip of the iceberg about some important topics, such as the discussion about liability issues concerning software and robots.“The arts should be able to mirror something that is happening in contemporary society in a contemporary way. We really want to provide new spaces to think about the goods traded on these markets. Why are they traded? How do we as a society deal with these spaces? At the moment there is just a lot of pressure, but not a lot of thinking about stuff, just immediate reaction” Weisskopf, member of !Mediengruppe Bitnik, said.In the meantime, some of the dark markets which are mostly being used for drug trading have been shut down, while others continue to exist and even flourish.Via: The Guardian, BBC, !Mediengruppe Bitnik Images: !Mediengruppe Bitnik [post_title] => If a Robot Buys XTC on the Dark Web, Who is Responsible? [post_excerpt] => The Random Darknet Shopper, with bitcoin to burn, has purchased counterfeit jeans, master keys, dodgy cigs and even a bag of ecstasy tablets. Who is legally liable? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robot-buys-xtc-dark-web-responsible [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-10-02 22:48:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-10-02 20:48:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=57189 [menu_order] => 526 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 55300 [post_author] => 824 [post_date] => 2015-07-24 16:14:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-24 14:14:00 [post_content] => Two American hackers, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, during the last two years have been working on hacking cars to takeover full control of vehicles. At the beginning of the project in 2013, their hacks had limitations: they had to sit in the back of the car with their laptops hooked up with wires to the cars central nervous system. Today the two hackers have gone wireless, operating over the internet.This was possible because car manufactures are implementing smart inter-connective technologies and integrating WiFi hot spots into their products. The only thing a hacker needs to know is the car IP address to take full control over the car, anytime anywhere. “From an attacker’s perspective, it’s a super nice vulnerability”Miller says. “This is what everyone who thinks about car security has worried about for years. This is a reality”.150701_car_hackers_12-1024x683-530x353_2150701_car_hackers_17-1024x683-530x353_3Read more at: Wired [post_title] => Hacking And Controlling Cars Remotely [post_excerpt] => Two American hackers have been working on hacking cars to takeover full control of vehicles. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hacking-and-controlling-cars-remotely [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-08-12 09:55:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-12 07:55:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net.webslice.eu/?p=55300 [menu_order] => 582 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 107994 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2019-02-07 13:04:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-07 12:04:11 [post_content] =>

Sequels and prequels appear in our cinemas every day but somehow we haven’t had a follow-up to our infamous Next Nature movie top 10 that fully deserves the “sequel treatment”.

Allow us to refresh your memory:

1. Quest for Fire / La Guerre du Feu (1981)
2. Being There (1979)
3. Koyaansiqatsi (1983)
4. Blade Runner (1984)
5. American Beauty (1999)
6.The Matrix (1999)
7. Grizzly Man (2005)
8. Avatar (2009)
9. The Terminal (2004)
10. Idiocracy (2006)

Thus our carefully crafted, not updated yet timeless, always debatable and incomplete list of the ten next nature movies for you to watch.

Now, our top 10 is getting a sequal series, many years on from its completion after bingewatching (ahem, working) for the sake of research.

Is there a movie (2010-present) of which you think deserves a spot in the Next Nature movie top 10, part two? Share your suggestions in the comments below ?

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