18 results for “Mass-customization”

Fast Food = Lower Test Scores

Alessia Andreotti
June 13th 2015
The amount of fast food children eat may be linked to how well they do in school, a study suggests.

Zero-Waste Grocery Store

Julia Weber
July 4th 2014
The first Zero-Waste Grocery Store "Original Unverpackt" will open this summer in Germany.

The Fist Bump Manifesto

Alessia Andreotti
November 27th 2013
From the handshake to the sanitary, gender-neutral fist bump.

Not so Happy Meals

Arnoud van den Heuvel
June 17th 2009


This week a Brazilian prosecutor asked a judge to nationally ban toys sold with meals in fast-food outlets like McDonald's and Burger King, because it can lead children to develop bad eating habits. The move comes amid wide-spread concern over the link between some fast food and illnesses such as diabetes, as the U.S. congress considers requiring chain restaurants to disclose calories on their menus to help fight endemic obesity.

Prosecutor Marcio Schusterschitz, a federal prosecutor in Brazil's Sao Paulo …

Miracle Banana Diet

Arnoud van den Heuvel
April 7th 2009

The 150 people watching this Youtube-commercial right now, will copy the source and blog or twitter it forward because it diggs. 40 of them have remorse over the fact that it is an ordinary commercial and not a live search engine to be able to know what's going on in the Next Nature. 10% of them is thinking; "But this search engine is sure to exist in 5 to 10 years". 2% will post a comment about it and there's …

YourDay

Arnoud van den Heuvel
March 1st 2009

Visitors of the British amusement park Alton Towers can have themselves wristbanded and RFID tracked in order to buy a "personalised" DVD at the end of their visit. Precomposed videomaterial is mixed with CCTV footage, featuring the wristband-wearer, friends and family having a great personalized collective experience day out. Watch some video examples here.

Mark the day that the British started paying for their own surveillance camera footage!

via: boingboing.net | related: CCTV Total World Domination | Smart Forests EWAN…

Controlling the Uncontrollable

Arnoud van den Heuvel
January 12th 2009


It is a home to crawlers, virusses, search engines, gamers, spammers, chatters, twitters, bloggers, worms and spiders. If calling it alive goes too far, it's still safe to say that the internet forms a nature of its own. Would the new American president have won the elections if he had ignored its tentacles? How many people would be out of a job if it seized to exist? Internet's garden is blooming like never seen before, yet some people only enjoy …

Brain Needs ‘Nature’

Arnoud van den Heuvel
January 8th 2009

Scientists have begun to examine how the city affects the brain, and the results are chastening. Just being in an urban environment, they have found, impairs our basic mental processes. After spending a few minutes on a crowded city street, the brain is less able to hold things in memory, and suffers from reduced self-control. While it's long been recognized that city life is exhausting -- that's why Picasso left Paris -- this new research suggests that cities actually dull …

Searching for something to drink

Arnoud van den Heuvel
September 21st 2008

Copy and paste the successful and your shop will survive. That's what these Indian entrepreneurs must have figured in the city of Mumbai. Peculiar detail: a trademark on that logo!? 🙂

Gola is a kind of Indian Slush Puppie - crushed ice with flavoured syrup on top.

Via BoingBoing and creativereview.co.uk …

Design for dummies

Arnoud van den Heuvel
September 2nd 2008

Creativity for all! Design used to be predestined to a select group of qualified brand–owning designers. That model is made redundant. At least, if it is up to Studio Ludens in Eindhoven (The Netherlands). Today you can sculpt and buy your lamp or coaster on the internet; tomorrow it's your house, car and mother–in–law. In the Next Nature everyone is a designer.

Related: Sexual behaviour totems | Park buildings | Digital Trashcan brought to virtual office…

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Researches reveal that students who ate fast food often obtained test scores that were 20 percent lower than those who didn’t consume any fast food.Ohio State University assistant professor of human sciences Kelly Purtell released a study showing that increased frequency of fast food consumption led to lower test results in reading, math and science."There’s a lot of evidence that fast-food consumption is linked to childhood obesity, but the problems don’t end there" said Purtell. "Relying too much on fast food could hurt how well children do in the classroom".During the study children who had fast food every day or four-six times a week had notably lower gains from fifth to eighth grade, compared to children who didn’t eat any fast food. Kids who had fast food just one-three times per week showed lower gains in one subject, math. The research took into account other factors that could have affected the test scores, such as the amount of exercise the children got, what else they ate, how much TV they watched and their family’s socioeconomic status, but the results remained unvaried.The study didn’t explore the reason why the amount of fast food kids eat may be linked to how well they do in school, but other investigations have shown that diets high in fat and sugar impede learning and cognitive processes. “We’re not saying that parents should never feed their children fast food, but these results suggest fast food consumption should be limited as much as possible” Purtell cautioned.If there was a sign on the door of McDonald’s saying “Caution: Eating our food will cause your child to do worse in school”, would parents make healthier choices?Source: Eco Child's Play Related post: Not so Happy Meals [post_title] => Fast Food = Lower Test Scores [post_excerpt] => The amount of fast food children eat may be linked to how well they do in school, a study suggests. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fast-food-lower-test-scores [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-06-08 23:19:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-06-08 21:19:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=45216 [menu_order] => 624 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 40273 [post_author] => 827 [post_date] => 2014-07-04 16:00:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-04 14:00:19 [post_content] => A four-strong team of young women from Germany launch a shopping revolution: with their crowdfunded supermarket Original Unverpackt they’re going to ban disposable packages. The shop will open its doors in late summer in Berlin Kreuzberg.Everything we buy is packed: from cucumbers to bananas, although they already have a perfect natural packaging. Just with our daily purchases, in total we produce 450 kilos of waste per year and per capita!One year ago the German team started to think about the idea of not recycling, but precycling. Just one day after they started the crowdfuning project, they collected 20.000 Euro. Midway through the campaign they set their funding goal at 45.000 Euro.The aim is to make consumers more conscious and enable the shopping experience to a completely new level. Every step of the supply chain is guided by the team's "Zero Waste" philosophy, as they say on their website: Sustainable consumption should be sexy.Instead of endless rows of products arranged on shelves, the fresh food will be serve up in bulk bins and dry goods can be dispensed from gravity bins. This allows shoppers to customize their purchase and avoid food wasting at home. Customers will bring their own containers, borrow reusable containers from the store or use recycled paper bags.original_unverpackt-4“Everyone should be able to afford to help the environment in the way they can” they explain. We hope this concept will also be adopt by the large concerns. So don't forget to bring your own container into the future!Source: Original-Unverpackt.de Related Post: Plastic Planet, The Banana Gets a Second Skin [post_title] => Zero-Waste Grocery Store [post_excerpt] => The first Zero-Waste Grocery Store "Original Unverpackt" will open this summer in Germany. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-first-zero-waste-grocery-store [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-07-04 19:54:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-07-04 17:54:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=40273 [menu_order] => 971 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37252 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-11-27 10:18:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-27 09:18:31 [post_content] => European kiss on the cheeks, one, two, three or four times depending from the Country, Asians bow, gentlemen kiss ladies' hands, and young people give high fives. But soon we all could greet in the same way: fist bumping. As a Society of Simulations we seem to be doing all that we can to remove ourselves from personal interactions on a face to face level. From the perspective of spreading bacteria, fist bumping may be a more sanitary way to greet others. Will it replace the most common of the greeting rituals, the handshake?“The fist bump has science behind it – reason to hasten its integration as a formal gesture of gender-neutral respect. The handshake, its alternative, is unsanitary. The handshake is outdated in most places, born of a time when we might all be expected to be concealing sabers. It would make more sense for us to casually intertwine almost any other part of our bodies with those of strangers”.Could this evolve to the point that we will just wave to one another from a safe distance?Read more in The Fist Bump Manifeston The Atlantic [post_title] => The Fist Bump Manifesto [post_excerpt] => From the handshake to the sanitary, gender-neutral fist bump. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-fist-bump-manifesto [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-11-27 10:18:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-11-27 09:18:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37252 [menu_order] => 1189 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3609 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-06-17 11:39:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-06-17 10:39:11 [post_content] => Not so Happy Meals This week a Brazilian prosecutor asked a judge to nationally ban toys sold with meals in fast-food outlets like McDonald's and Burger King, because it can lead children to develop bad eating habits. The move comes amid wide-spread concern over the link between some fast food and illnesses such as diabetes, as the U.S. congress considers requiring chain restaurants to disclose calories on their menus to help fight endemic obesity.Prosecutor Marcio Schusterschitz, a federal prosecutor in Brazil's Sao Paulo state, said fast-food toy promotions encourage children to buy high-fat meals through "the abusive creation of emotional associations" that turn them into life-long eaters of high-fat foods. Read the full article on uk.reuters.com  Toys are us... Apart from the health-aspect and cases of obesity, this article makes me wondering; how much plastic are we talking about on a yearly basis? According to thebluebrick.net, it takes 34 cents to manufacture and package each Happy Meal toy. At 2.5 million Happy Meals sold annually, $850 thousand is spent on those little wads of plastic a year.You think that is much? Why no; it is good investment. Children really need some entertainment to go with their meals. It is educational, every toy is played with over and over again and almost never thrown away. And when children play, they burn calories. I guess it is the toys that determine the nature we deserve.Related: Fake For Real: Image Consumption | Hamburger Sneaker | Million Dollar Burger | They are made out of Meat | Where it came from | [post_title] => Not so Happy Meals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => not-so-happy-meals [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-06-17 19:09:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-06-17 18:09:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3609 [menu_order] => 2855 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 5 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3349 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-04-07 20:46:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-04-07 19:46:45 [post_content] => [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFLzHLGRv7M[/youtube]The 150 people watching this Youtube-commercial right now, will copy the source and blog or twitter it forward because it diggs. 40 of them have remorse over the fact that it is an ordinary commercial and not a live search engine to be able to know what's going on in the Next Nature. 10% of them is thinking; "But this search engine is sure to exist in 5 to 10 years". 2% will post a comment about it and there's a 50% chance you are thinking to creatively post something to make me have my facts wrong.Via: scaryideas.com [post_title] => Miracle Banana Diet [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => miracle-banana-diet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-05 12:16:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-05 11:16:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3349 [menu_order] => 2929 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3208 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-03-01 12:13:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-03-01 11:13:07 [post_content] => yourday01Visitors of the British amusement park Alton Towers can have themselves wristbanded and RFID tracked in order to buy a "personalised" DVD at the end of their visit. Precomposed videomaterial is mixed with CCTV footage, featuring the wristband-wearer, friends and family having a great personalized collective experience day out. Watch some video examples here.yourday02Mark the day that the British started paying for their own surveillance camera footage!via: boingboing.net | related: CCTV Total World Domination | Smart Forests EWAN [post_title] => YourDay [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => yourday [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-12-23 14:26:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-12-23 13:26:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3208 [menu_order] => 2965 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3072 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-01-12 21:23:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-01-12 20:23:02 [post_content] => i love china It is a home to crawlers, virusses, search engines, gamers, spammers, chatters, twitters, bloggers, worms and spiders. If calling it alive goes too far, it's still safe to say that the internet forms a nature of its own. Would the new American president have won the elections if he had ignored its tentacles? How many people would be out of a job if it seized to exist? Internet's garden is blooming like never seen before, yet some people only enjoy gardens without the weeds.---Article by Michael Bristow, published at news.bbc.co.uk.China is using an increasing number of paid "internet commentators" in a sophisticated attempt to control public opinion. These commentators are used by government departments to scour the internet for bad news - and then negate it. They post comments on websites and forums that spin bad news into good in an attempt to shape public opinion.Chinese leaders seem aware that the internet - the only public forum where views can be freely expressed - needs close attention. China's Communist Party leaders have long sought to sway public opinion by controlling what the media can report. That policy was extended to the internet, and many websites are blocked by a system sometimes dubbed the "great firewall of China". [...]A document released by the public security bureau in the city of Jiaozuo in Henan province boasts of the success of this approach. It retells the story of one disgruntled citizen who posted an unfavourable comment about the police on a website after being punished for a traffic offence. One of the bureau's internet commentators reported this posting to the authorities within 10 minutes of it going up. The bureau then began to spin, using more than 120 people to post their own comments that neatly shifted the debate."Twenty minutes later, most postings supported the police - in fact many internet users began to condemn the original commentator," said the report.---Now that's powerful fertilizer folks! Time will tell if the gardeners will start spraying in the Next Nature.read the full article at news.bbc.co.uk | see also this article at: chinadigitaltimes.net [post_title] => Controlling the Uncontrollable [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => controlling-the-uncontrollable [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-12-23 14:28:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-12-23 13:28:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3072 [menu_order] => 3008 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 3 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3067 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-01-08 11:06:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-01-08 10:06:16 [post_content] =>

Scientists have begun to examine how the city affects the brain, and the results are chastening. Just being in an urban environment, they have found, impairs our basic mental processes. After spending a few minutes on a crowded city street, the brain is less able to hold things in memory, and suffers from reduced self-control. While it's long been recognized that city life is exhausting -- that's why Picasso left Paris -- this new research suggests that cities actually dull our thinking, sometimes dramatically so. [...]

One of the main forces at work is a stark lack of nature, which is surprisingly beneficial for the brain. Studies have demonstrated, for instance, that hospital patients recover more quickly when they can see trees from their windows, and that women living in public housing are better able to focus when their apartment overlooks a grassy courtyard. [...]This research arrives just as humans cross an important milestone: For the first time in history, the majority of people reside in cities. For a species that evolved to live in small, primate tribes on the African savannah, such a migration marks a dramatic shift. Instead of inhabiting wide-open spaces, we're crowded into concrete jungles, surrounded by taxis, traffic, and millions of strangers. In recent years, it's become clear that such unnatural surroundings have important implications for our mental and physical health, and can powerfully alter how we think.This research is also leading some scientists to dabble in urban design, as they look for ways to make the metropolis less damaging to the brain. The good news is that even slight alterations, such as planting more trees in the inner city or creating urban parks with a greater variety of plants, can significantly reduce the negative side effects of city life. The mind needs nature, and even a little bit can be a big help. [...]

The density of city life doesn't just make it harder to focus: It also interferes with our self-control. In a stroll down a busy street, the brain is also assaulted with temptations -- caramel lattes, iPods, discounted cashmere sweaters, and high-heeled shoes. Resisting these temptations requires us to flex the prefrontal cortex, a nub of brain just behind the eyes. Unfortunately, this is the same brain area that's responsible for directed attention, which means that it's already been depleted from walking around the city. As a result, it's less able to exert self-control, which means we're more likely to splurge on the latte and those shoes we don't really need. While the human brain possesses incredible computational powers, it's surprisingly easy to short-circuit: all it takes is a hectic city street. [...]

Related research has demonstrated that increased "cognitive load" -- like the mental demands of being in a city -- makes people more likely to choose chocolate cake instead of fruit salad, or indulge in a unhealthy snack. This is the one-two punch of city life: It subverts our ability to resist temptation even as it surrounds us with it, from fast-food outlets to fancy clothing stores. The end result is too many calories and too much credit card debt. [...]Article by Jonah Lehrer. Read the full article at boston.com [post_title] => Brain Needs 'Nature' [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => brain-needs-nature [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-08-01 18:38:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-01 16:38:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3067 [menu_order] => 3012 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2786 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2008-09-21 23:35:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-09-21 22:35:10 [post_content] => gogolaCopy and paste the successful and your shop will survive. That's what these Indian entrepreneurs must have figured in the city of Mumbai. Peculiar detail: a trademark on that logo!? :)gogola02Gola is a kind of Indian Slush Puppie - crushed ice with flavoured syrup on top. Via BoingBoing and creativereview.co.uk [post_title] => Searching for something to drink [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => searching-for-something-to-drink [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-08-11 12:47:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-08-11 10:47:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=2786 [menu_order] => 3120 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2729 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2008-09-02 09:11:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-09-02 08:11:01 [post_content] => studio ludens lampCreativity for all! Design used to be predestined to a select group of qualified brand–owning designers. That model is made redundant. At least, if it is up to Studio Ludens in Eindhoven (The Netherlands). Today you can sculpt and buy your lamp or coaster on the internet; tomorrow it's your house, car and mother–in–law. In the Next Nature everyone is a designer.Related: Sexual behaviour totems | Park buildings | Digital Trashcan brought to virtual office [post_title] => Design for dummies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-for-dummies [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-09-02 22:03:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2008-09-02 21:03:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=2729 [menu_order] => 3136 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 45216 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2015-06-13 16:00:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-13 14:00:04 [post_content] => Too much junk food might be bad for the brain, as well as for the body. Researches reveal that students who ate fast food often obtained test scores that were 20 percent lower than those who didn’t consume any fast food.Ohio State University assistant professor of human sciences Kelly Purtell released a study showing that increased frequency of fast food consumption led to lower test results in reading, math and science."There’s a lot of evidence that fast-food consumption is linked to childhood obesity, but the problems don’t end there" said Purtell. "Relying too much on fast food could hurt how well children do in the classroom".During the study children who had fast food every day or four-six times a week had notably lower gains from fifth to eighth grade, compared to children who didn’t eat any fast food. Kids who had fast food just one-three times per week showed lower gains in one subject, math. The research took into account other factors that could have affected the test scores, such as the amount of exercise the children got, what else they ate, how much TV they watched and their family’s socioeconomic status, but the results remained unvaried.The study didn’t explore the reason why the amount of fast food kids eat may be linked to how well they do in school, but other investigations have shown that diets high in fat and sugar impede learning and cognitive processes. “We’re not saying that parents should never feed their children fast food, but these results suggest fast food consumption should be limited as much as possible” Purtell cautioned.If there was a sign on the door of McDonald’s saying “Caution: Eating our food will cause your child to do worse in school”, would parents make healthier choices?Source: Eco Child's Play Related post: Not so Happy Meals [post_title] => Fast Food = Lower Test Scores [post_excerpt] => The amount of fast food children eat may be linked to how well they do in school, a study suggests. 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