24 results for “Media Schemas”

Your Next Nature guide to Transmediale 2019

NextNature.net
January 18th 2019

Berlin is kicking off its cultural season with the not-to-miss 23th installment of Transmediale. This year the digital art/culture festival focuses on how feelings are made into objects of technological design, and asks what role emotions and empathy play within digital culture.

We combed the program so you don't have to:

How to Grow and Use Your Feelers (Workshop. Wednesday from 11:00 to 14:00

Donna Harrway's writings inspired the interdisciplinary techno-feminist research group #purplenoise to immerse us in a world …

China’s state news agency has unveiled a virtual newsreader

bryan clark
November 10th 2018

Don’t adjust your TV set, that’s just a new computer-generated news anchor working out the bugs.…

We Are What We Like

Alessia Andreotti
January 14th 2015
According to a study our PC, equipped with a list of things we "Like" on Facebook , knows us better than our friends.

Falling in Love According to Facebook

Alessia Andreotti
February 20th 2014
Facebook data science analyzed what happens to our virtual life when we fall in love.

Exploring the Society of Simulations with “Her”: Nextnatural Movie

Alessia Andreotti
February 8th 2014
A man falls in love w/ his artificially intelligent operating system.

Belief System Meets Operating System

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
February 6th 2014
The façade of an Indian temple constructed from a large-scale print of a Facebook Wall.

Assemble Your Own Computer

Alessia Andreotti
February 2nd 2014
Kano: the low-cost computer anyone can assemble.

Pixel Nostalgia Leads to Digital Pointillism

Alessia Andreotti
December 10th 2013
The return of megapixels.

iTypewriter

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
August 18th 2013
Miss the soothing clacking of typewriter keys? Long for satisfying clang of a carriage return? Get iTypewriter for iPad.

Interact with Friends (in Real Life) with Facebook Monopoly

Alessia Andreotti
July 25th 2013
A Facebook version of Monopoly forces players to interact with each other in meatspace.
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Berlin is kicking off its cultural season with the not-to-miss 23th installment of Transmediale. This year the digital art/culture festival focuses on how feelings are made into objects of technological design, and asks what role emotions and empathy play within digital culture.

We combed the program so you don't have to:

How to Grow and Use Your Feelers (Workshop. Wednesday from 11:00 to 14:00

Donna Harrway's writings inspired the interdisciplinary techno-feminist research group #purplenoise to immerse us in a world of “feelers” as symbols for an extended human sensorium.

Algorithmic Intimacies (Talk. Saturday from 12:00 to 13:30)

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life, yet there's a deficit in current understandings of how technologies are used within algorithmic intimacies. In this talk, fembots, virtual assistants and dating apps are discussed to reflect upon how today’s algorithmic lives are felt.

Knitting and Knotting Love (Keynote. Saturday from 18:00 to 19:30)

How do you love? And how is this love traversed through networks? In their performative lecture at transmediale 2019, Shaka McGlotten tracks a networked experience of love.

Alter Media (Screening. Saturday from 19:30 to 21:30)

From global connectedness bridging unimaginable distances to data abuse, automated opinion manipulation and unrestrained marketing strategies. This screening depicts a broad spectrum of lived experiences with the media spheres of our time.

Actress + Young Paint (live AI/AV) (Performance. Saturday from 21:30 to 22:30)

Meet the AI-based character that spends its time programming Actress’ sonic palette. Expect a life-size projection of the AI working in a virtual studio, coming together with a physical performance on stage.

Cover image: Rory Pilgrim, Software Garden, 2018. Courtesty of the artist and andriesse-eyck galerie Some rights reserved. (Performance: Friday from 20:00 to 21:00)

Transmediale 2019 takes place from 31 January to 3 February 2019 at Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Tickets.

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Don’t adjust your TV set, that’s just a new computer-generated news anchor working out the bugs.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAfiATTQufk[/youtube]

Xinhua, a Chinese state-run media company, and Sogou, a Beijing-based search engine debuted a pair of AI news anchors this week at the World Internet Conference. While identical in appearance, the two versions are designed to appease both English and Mandarin-speaking watchers. Both are carbon copies of a real-life anchor, Zhang Zhao.

To create the life-like replica, the teams poured over hours of video and went to great lengths to recreate the mannerisms and idiosyncrasies of actual broadcast news anchors — complete with realistic lip movements and facial expressions.

“AI anchors have officially become members of Xinhua‘s reporting team,” the report said. “Together with other anchors, they will bring you authoritative, timely and accurate news information in Chinese and English.”

The team says that its AI can read texts as naturally as a professional news anchor, a claim that’s dubious, at best. It does, however, exceed humans in one key area: it never needs to eat or sleep. This version can read the news, uninterrupted, 24/7. The AI confirms as much, saying “I will work tirelessly to keep you informed as texts will be typed into my system uninterrupted.”

Xinhua said, in its report:

"AI anchors have officially become members of Xinhua‘s reporting team. Together with other anchors, they will bring you authoritative, timely and accurate news information in Chinese and English."

Both anchors have already been put to work on a handful of distribution channels, like its public WeChat account, the TV webpage, two Weibo accounts, and the network’s English and Chinese apps.

[post_title] => China's state news agency has unveiled a virtual newsreader [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virtual-newsreader [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 16:33:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 15:33:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91581 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 42424 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2015-01-14 13:00:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-14 12:00:38 [post_content] => Every time we use our PC we leave behind lots of personal information that computers use to understand our personality and what we like, far better than our own mother, family or friends.According to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Cambridge and Stanford University, our computer – equipped with a list of things we "Like" on Facebook - knows us more than our kith and kin (and probably even better than we know ourselves).The researchers have compared the personality traits of 86.000 participants acquired via an analysis of their Facebook activity. By collecting the social media "Likes", the computer model proved to be very precise at identify a person’s self-reported personality. Where the team had gathered data from over 100 Facebook "Likes" for user, their algorithms could determine the character of that person more accurately than the circle of friends.There is more! This technique is not limited to Facebook, every evidence left on a PC, from the websites we visited to the purchase we made, can define what kind of person we are. The researchers’ team suggest that the study could be used also to predict our suitability for a job. Instead of applying for new employment, algorithms would find it for us by scouring internet data. Might be time to become more selective about what we like on Facebook!Source: Quartz [post_title] => We Are What We Like [post_excerpt] => According to a study our PC, equipped with a list of things we "Like" on Facebook , knows us better than our friends. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => you-are-what-you-like [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-10 17:43:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-10 16:43:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=42424 [menu_order] => 800 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38322 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2014-02-20 15:00:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-20 14:00:56 [post_content] => From Single to In a Relationship: Facebook and love in the Big Data era. The social network data science analyzed what happens to our virtual alter ego when we fall in love.Courtship, messages, profile visits, shared posts; what love looks like according to Facebook servers? Two people who are about to become a couple share a large number of timeline posts, more optimistic and happier than usual. Then, when the love takes wing, online interactions quickly decrease. “Presumably, couples decide to spend more time together, courtship is off, and online interactions give way to more interactions in the physical world” writes Facebook data scientist Carlos Diuk.Facebook knows everything about us: job role, friendships, favorite spots, hobbies and diversions. And, based on how we relate to one another, even who our special person will be, long time before the new relationship is announced. What about single people, are they in a relationship with media?Facebook_relationships2Source: The Formation of Love [post_title] => Falling in Love According to Facebook [post_excerpt] => Facebook data science analyzed what happens to our virtual life when we fall in love. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => love-according-to-facebook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-25 09:03:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-25 07:03:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38322 [menu_order] => 1098 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38108 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2014-02-08 10:30:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-08 09:30:03 [post_content] => What about a movie night? A new nextnatural film is on the big screen! We are talking about “Her”, a science-fiction romance written and directed by Spike Jonze, set in a not too distant  future. Part of the movie’s charm is just how meticulously Jonze has imagined and constructed a future Los Angeles: its smoggy skies, its glittering skyscrapers, its efficient transit system.The movie tells the story of the modern age love relationship between, Theodore (played by Joaquin Phoenix), a lonely man who writes love letters for people with difficulties expressing their feeling, and Samantha (Scarlett Johansson). Samantha, it should be mentioned, is an intelligent computer-operating system.HERUnhappy because of his upcoming pending divorce from his childhood sweetheart, Theodore decides to purchase a talking operating system (O.S.) with artificial intelligence, designed to adapt and evolve like a human being. He decides he wants the O.S. to have a female identity, and she names herself  Samantha. Theodore is fascinated by her ability to learn and grow psychologically, to the point to feel emotions. She purrs in his ear with the dulcet tones of Scarlett Johansson, she organizes his emails and calendar and she completes that book proposal he has always been meaning to finish, she supply original romantic music compositions for him, and steamy phone sex.Quickly their intimacy grows, to the point he considers, and calls, Samantha his girlfriend, bringing her everywhere he goes. He even becomes jealous when he discovers that the operating system is in contact with 8.316 other users or O.Ses, and that she is in love with 641 of them.Their relationship ends when Samantha reveals that the OSes have evolved beyond their human companions and are going away to continue the exploration of their existence.The movie makes us reflect about the difficulty of human connections, and the need to go beyond technological simulacra. Obstacles, such as social media and other technologies, that are supposed to bring us closer, in reality drive us apart. The result could be a world like the one described in “Her”: a society where it’s ok to commission to strangers the composition of intimate letters, and where a men prefer to fall in love with a bodiless computer rather than a human being. A place where simulations can be more influential, satisfying and meaningful than the reality they are presumed to represent. The setting of the movie in a near future, in a world almost like ours, make us believe that we could live in this future. From the smatphones that tell us about the world around us, so that we don’t need to look at it, to the e-mails checked while on the metro, passing through the presence of videogames, the media are filters through which the characters survey the world around them. Throughout the movie Jonze drops funny hints about how the existence of artificial intelligence in human society might affect us.Virtual computer worlds are becoming increasingly ‘real’ and blended with our physical world. “Her” remind us that our technologies, even if perfectly shaped on our needs, habits and desires, don’t always lead to fully satisfactory endings.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ne6p6MfLBxc[/youtube] [post_title] => Exploring the Society of Simulations with "Her": Nextnatural Movie [post_excerpt] => A man falls in love w/ his artificially intelligent operating system. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => into-society-of-simulations-with-her [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 17:02:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 16:02:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38108 [menu_order] => 1113 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35239 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2014-02-06 10:30:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-06 09:30:47 [post_content] => The image above depicts two seemingly Indian men sitting in front of what looks like an improvised temple or shrine for the hindu goddess Saraswati. What makes the image curious, is that the façade of the temple is constructed from a large-scale print of a Facebook Wall, dedicated to the deity. Do we have a Boomeranged Metaphor here or is it time to coin a new term: the Reincarnated Interface?Saraswati’s social network seems to consist mostly of peers in the realm of gods. Judging by the sidebar activity, her online social life is quite active but not so much concerned with us mortals; we can see that Brahma likes his own photo, Kali just updated her profile picture and Durga, in return, just liked Shiva’s status. Lord Shiva is also avaiable for a chat conversation, by the way. Oh, and Krishna also just came online. Quite some unanswered messages, status updates and invites also.Wat fascinates me about this image, is that it seems so weird and exotic for me, but apparently not at all for the guys posing in the picture. When we visit the Saraswati page on Facebook, we can see that the admins changed the profile picture into that of the guys in the Facebook Temple.In the western part of the world, most religious belief systems have been replaced, or updated if you want, by a belief in technology. But for the biggest part of the world this hasn’t been the case. India is one of those places in the world where traditional values meet future technologies. Or, put differently: where Belief Systems meet Operating Systems. For the people in the picture, there might not be a contradiction here. Should we reboot?

Page of Saraswati on Facebook

[post_title] => Belief System Meets Operating System [post_excerpt] => The façade of an Indian temple constructed from a large-scale print of a Facebook Wall. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => belief-system-meets-operating-system [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 17:01:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 16:01:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35239 [menu_order] => 1115 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38024 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2014-02-02 10:30:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-02 09:30:00 [post_content] => Buy a computer for $99 and put it together in 107 seconds is now possible! Based on simple steps, physical computing, and play, Kano is the computer anyone can make, as affirmed in its slogan.It comes as a toolkit that can be assembled like a Lego, to start coding immediately using visual programming languages hooked up to games. The set includes a minicomputer powered by Raspberry Pi, games, a speaker, a wireless server and a custom case.“We often draw lines between things: art and science, code and design, STEM and humanities. It makes "digital literacy" seem like Brussels sprouts -- good for you, but hard to chew" the team says on Kano Kickstarter page.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNc6NRX2JG4[/youtube] [post_title] => Assemble Your Own Computer [post_excerpt] => Kano: the low-cost computer anyone can assemble. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => assemble-your-own-computer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 17:01:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 16:01:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38024 [menu_order] => 1120 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37445 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-12-10 10:21:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-10 09:21:42 [post_content] => For years, we have assisted in the war of megapixels. Smartphones, cameras and tablets do battle offering the most powerful, detailed and high definition displays and pictures. Nevertheless, around the web the opposite trend is spreading: returning to the digital image essence, the pixel. Through an app (I Pixel U) is it possible to transform our snapshots in dots, choosing the subject to blur and leaving the rest intact. It’s a sort of nostalgic action that reminds us at the same time of the painting technique of Pointillism and the oldest video games. Progressive Nostalgia, indeed! [post_title] => Pixel Nostalgia Leads to Digital Pointillism [post_excerpt] => The return of megapixels. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pixel-nostalgia-brings-in-digital-pointillism [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 17:00:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 16:00:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37445 [menu_order] => 1171 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35850 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2013-08-18 21:46:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-08-18 19:46:40 [post_content] => As technology progresses we constantly have to adapt ourselves to new gadgets, yet occasionally, we need a gadget that feeds on our nostalgic sensibilities.Miss the soothing clacking of typewriter keys? Long for satisfying clang of a carriage return? The iTypewriter, created by industrial designer Austin Yang, adds the old-fashioned typewriter feeling to your iPad, allowing you to relive those Mad Men days, or ensure that everyone in the library hates you by the time you hit ‘send’. [post_title] => iTypewriter [post_excerpt] => Miss the soothing clacking of typewriter keys? Long for satisfying clang of a carriage return? Get iTypewriter for iPad. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => itypewriter [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-04 16:59:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-04 15:59:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35850 [menu_order] => 1300 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35350 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-07-25 10:00:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-25 08:00:42 [post_content] => With Facebook: The Board Game, American graphic designer Pat C. Klein brings social media to the real world. The artist reinvented the most classic board game, Monopoly, by replacing houses, hotels, streets, Chance and Community Chest with the famous activities of Zuckerberg's social network.Klein’s goal is to get people to interact with each other in person, tackling the digital life and the web omnipresence. As he explains:"As a young person living in the digital age, I feel as though the internet is affecting our ability to communicate with one another. Research done by Stanford University has indicated that social networking sites like Facebook can increase loneliness, depression and insecurity. Facebook: The Board Game was created as a response to this. The idea is that instead of engaging with Facebook on your computer or phone, you can arrange to meet up with friends, have a few drinks and play in real life".The result is a white and blue board where Jail was changed into Account Suspended, GO became Collect a free “like” card, Go to Jail turned into Forgot Log-in and Free Parking into Refresh Page. What about the game pieces? The game pieces are us!So, when a player lands on Status he has to share good news or reveal future plans. The box Video forces to watch a video with somebody. Features like Events encourage to plan a gathering with another player.Klein had fun adding a “sadistic” note to the game, with repercussions in real life. For instance, Unattended PC allows a player to reveal something embarrassing about the next person to leave the room, while Break Up forces people in relationship to break up. As they say: life is a game! [post_title] => Interact with Friends (in Real Life) with Facebook Monopoly [post_excerpt] => A Facebook version of Monopoly forces players to interact with each other in meatspace. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interact-with-friends-in-real-life-with-facebook-monopoly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-25 11:22:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-25 09:22:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35350 [menu_order] => 1329 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 107665 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2019-01-18 12:43:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-18 11:43:27 [post_content] =>

Berlin is kicking off its cultural season with the not-to-miss 23th installment of Transmediale. This year the digital art/culture festival focuses on how feelings are made into objects of technological design, and asks what role emotions and empathy play within digital culture.

We combed the program so you don't have to:

How to Grow and Use Your Feelers (Workshop. Wednesday from 11:00 to 14:00

Donna Harrway's writings inspired the interdisciplinary techno-feminist research group #purplenoise to immerse us in a world of “feelers” as symbols for an extended human sensorium.

Algorithmic Intimacies (Talk. Saturday from 12:00 to 13:30)

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life, yet there's a deficit in current understandings of how technologies are used within algorithmic intimacies. In this talk, fembots, virtual assistants and dating apps are discussed to reflect upon how today’s algorithmic lives are felt.

Knitting and Knotting Love (Keynote. Saturday from 18:00 to 19:30)

How do you love? And how is this love traversed through networks? In their performative lecture at transmediale 2019, Shaka McGlotten tracks a networked experience of love.

Alter Media (Screening. Saturday from 19:30 to 21:30)

From global connectedness bridging unimaginable distances to data abuse, automated opinion manipulation and unrestrained marketing strategies. This screening depicts a broad spectrum of lived experiences with the media spheres of our time.

Actress + Young Paint (live AI/AV) (Performance. Saturday from 21:30 to 22:30)

Meet the AI-based character that spends its time programming Actress’ sonic palette. Expect a life-size projection of the AI working in a virtual studio, coming together with a physical performance on stage.

Cover image: Rory Pilgrim, Software Garden, 2018. Courtesty of the artist and andriesse-eyck galerie Some rights reserved. (Performance: Friday from 20:00 to 21:00)

Transmediale 2019 takes place from 31 January to 3 February 2019 at Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Tickets.

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