402 results for “Office Garden”

Meet Emma: Your colleague of the future comes with a warning

Freya Hutchings
October 29th 2019

Emma is in poor health. She has painful varicose veins, stress-related eczema, puffy skin, a grey complexion, red eyes and a hunch-back. She is an imagined office worker of the future — a morbid life-sized doll that forecasts the impact of office work on human evolution. According researchers at Fellowes, if we don’t do something, Emma could resemble most of your colleagues in 20-years time.

Indeed, Emma embodies the evolutionary impact of our current work culture on the human body. Apparently, …

Five (un)mundane things to do at Dutch Design Week 2019

Freya Hutchings
October 17th 2019

Lining up plans for Dutch Design Week? Once more, 2600 designers gather in over 120 locations during 450 events. So whether you're a local, new in town, or just passing through, you may still be agonizing over the extensive program in order to prioritize your favorites.

With this guide, we’re going back to basics. These five highlights will transform your mundane, everyday actions into extraordinary interactions — be it with other humans, data, organisms and even furniture.

Somewhere to ask…

Work with us!

NextNature.net
July 30th 2019

We are a network of makers, thinkers, educators and supporters. With members in 44 countries, we are the international network for anyone interested in the debate on our future – in which biology and technology are fusing.

We explore how technology becomes so omnipresent, complex, intimate and autonomous – a nature of its own. We stimulate discussion, initiate publications, events and traveling expositions on how to dream, build and live in the next nature.

That’s a towering goal, and to …

Games become jobs: Looking through the eye of the submarine with an X-Box controller

Kelly Streekstra
April 10th 2018

Submarines feature a special device called a periscope that allows people inside the submarine to see what's going on above water. Controlling such an eye requires hours of training, and costs a whopping $38.000 per ship. However, the new generation sailors saw fit for a millennial-ready tool: the 30$ X-box controller from that children's’ playstore around the corner. …

Here’s what manufacturing enhanced with virtual reality will look like

Megan Ray Nichols
March 1st 2018

Robots are coming for our jobs. Virtual reality is coming to make the jobs that remain easier to accomplish.

All of the world’s manufacturing sectors are in the process of applying VR to the dizzying number of tasks required all up and down the supply chain — from handling raw materials to shipping goods off to end-users. Don’t be surprised if the future of manufacturing looks quite a bit different than it does today thanks to this up-and-coming — and quickly …

AI & VR Impact on Architects and Engineers

Megan Ray Nichols
December 17th 2017
Future workspace, human interaction and unique experiences: here’s how artificial intelligence and VR impact on architects and engineers.

Make the World Your Office

Megan Ray Nichols
December 4th 2017
Imagine being able to enter your office through a digital representation of reality. It sounds crazy, but it’s possible with augmented and virtual reality.

What You Should Know About Artificial Intelligence Changing Jobs

Megan Ray Nichols
November 2nd 2017
It should come as no surprise that artificial intelligence naturally extends into the way we work. Let's look at how AI changes the way we relate to work.

HUBOT: Meet the Organ Designer

NextNature.net
October 27th 2017
As an organ designer, you develop genetic algorithms from which organs are grown to perfectly fit the recipient’s body, but also to meet the personal wishes of the patient.

Design Your Own Vegetables

Ruben Baart
September 19th 2017
With her project Future Food Formula, food designer Chloé Rutzerveld is looking for innovative methods to design vegetables.
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Emma is in poor health. She has painful varicose veins, stress-related eczema, puffy skin, a grey complexion, red eyes and a hunch-back. She is an imagined office worker of the future — a morbid life-sized doll that forecasts the impact of office work on human evolution. According researchers at Fellowes, if we don’t do something, Emma could resemble most of your colleagues in 20-years time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=fL5SuzGkUPw

Indeed, Emma embodies the evolutionary impact of our current work culture on the human body. Apparently, our humble office chairs are the biggest culprits - all together we spend an average of eight years of our life sitting down, which will gradually disfigure our bodies and weaken our muscles permanently. Additionally, trading sunlight for artificial light will lead to poor vision and chronic vitamin deficiency. This information may not be new, but being confronted with Emma certainly is.

How can we avoid this fate? Fellowes’ research suggests radical changes to our current ways of working. This means more walk-and-talk meetings, regular breaks, spaces in the office for exercise and relaxation, as well as different types of desks and work spaces that support our bodies.

This hyper-real rendering of a future office protagonist may indeed shock us into action. Emma also serves as a stark reminder of how, as much as we like to think we can use technology to shape the world around us for our needs, technology itself plays an active role in shaping us. How natural is it to sit in an office chair, staring at a computer for eight hours a day?

This story of evolution reveals how intertwined nature and technology can be, how our interactions with the things we make can literally transform our physicality, intervene in our development and influence the ‘natural’ biological processes of our bodies. We can no longer underestimate how, in some cases, we serve technology just as much as it serves us. 

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Lining up plans for Dutch Design Week? Once more, 2600 designers gather in over 120 locations during 450 events. So whether you're a local, new in town, or just passing through, you may still be agonizing over the extensive program in order to prioritize your favorites.

With this guide, we’re going back to basics. These five highlights will transform your mundane, everyday actions into extraordinary interactions — be it with other humans, data, organisms and even furniture.

Somewhere to ask questions

When we arrive somewhere new, we are always full of questions. You may be wondering, 'which way to the superhuman-space-suit-warrior exhibition you can’t remember the name of?' Or, 'where can I imagine a post-drought future?' And perhaps, 'when can I take shelter under a living pavilion?'

Once practical matters are out of the way, you may want to ask some more profound questions.

That's where RealiteitBureau steps in. They are here to remind us that design is not just something we go to see, but something that can facilitate meaningful interactions and in this case, ask questions.

What? A meeting point
When? All week from 19 to 27 October
Where? Plan-B

Somewhere to eat

After spending a couple of hours ticking off your must-see list, you may start to feel hungry. We suggest you go and sink your teeth into some delightfully sustainable snacks at the Future Food Experience, curated by NNN fellow Chloé Rutzerveld, where every bite tells a story.

You can enjoy an array ecologically conscious dishes, from Dutch delicacies frikadellen made from saved oyster mushroom stems, to algae burgers and tomato-stem sausages. All the food available is mostly plant based and locally produced.

And did we mention you can design your own vegetables?

What? A future food experience
When? 21 to 23 October
Where? CWF House, Level 3 Foyer

Somewhere to lie down

After enjoying some tasty sustainable treats, you may be in need of a lie down while your digestive system does the hard work. Make your way over to The Algae Bar and take a moment to rest under the specimen table.

While you rest, you will have the opportunity to donate Co2 and heat from your body by breathing into tubes that are linked to growing algae. Once the organisms have received the perfect amount of nourishment, they will return the favor: you will receive a nutrient-packed algae shot, smoothie or cocktail. This hidden gem of a food source is packed with proteins, carbohydrates, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

What? An interactive installation
When? 21 to 23 October
Where? CWF House, Level 3 Foyer

Somewhere to read

Re-energized? Good! Now it's time for a good read. Julia Janssen will be enlisting the help of hundreds of visitors in order to read aloud 835 privacy terms and conditions. This laborious task is usually avoided with a single click in just 0.0146 seconds.

This collective performance will take hours of reading over a number of days. By facing the sheer enormity and exploitative demands of the data economy, why not step in and help complete this inhumane task together and reconsider what we mindlessly ‘Accept’.

Participate as a reader by signing up here.

What? A public reading group
When? All week from 19 to 27 October
Where? Ketelhuisplein

Somewhere to sit

You’re a few design shows down, it’s late in the afternoon and you need to relax a little. Well, don’t get too comfy. When we say sit, we actually mean act, sing and dance. Confused? Go with it, the results could be enlightening.

Head over to MU and explore the movement of bodies. Here, we use experimental dance as a way of communicating how we interact with our furniture. Naturally, NNN fellow Govert Flint is among the participants, to showcase a series of seating arrangements that allow your brains to engage with your surroundings — in an entirely new way.

What? A theatre, a concert, a cinema, a gym and an exhibition in one
When? All week from 19 to 27 October
Where? MU

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We are a network of makers, thinkers, educators and supporters. With members in 44 countries, we are the international network for anyone interested in the debate on our future – in which biology and technology are fusing.

We explore how technology becomes so omnipresent, complex, intimate and autonomous – a nature of its own. We stimulate discussion, initiate publications, events and traveling expositions on how to dream, build and live in the next nature.

That’s a towering goal, and to achieve it, we need talent. Read on for descriptions of the individual opportunities:

Creative Producer EN/NL

We are looking for hands-on talent to handle our mobile exhibitions that travel throughout the Netherlands and abroad. Someone who is highly goal-orientated with the drive to meticulously produce the exhibitions demanded by our client base, has an intrinsic motivation to lead and inspire a team of tour guides, and knows how to properly communicate with our clients during pre-production. Read more.

Editor-in-Chief / Manager Online Magazine EN/NL

We are looking for a strategic talent to further develop our online magazine. Someone who is highly content-driven and holds the ability to create unique content based on the next nature philosophy, who has an ear to the ground for emerging next nature topics and knows how to communicate this to our audience via our online magazine, newsletters and social media. Read more.

Interested?

Apply before 16 August by sending your CV and cover letter to tim[at]nextnature.net, attn. Tim Hoogesteger, Managing Director. For questions about the role, feel free to give us a call at (+31) 20 261 3853.

We will schedule the first round of talks in the week of 19 August 2019.

[post_title] => Work with us! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => work-with-us [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-30 15:28:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-30 14:28:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=114545 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81206 [post_author] => 1510 [post_date] => 2018-04-10 15:25:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-10 14:25:31 [post_content] => Submarines feature a special device called a periscope that allows people inside the submarine to see what's going on above water. Controlling such an eye requires hours of training, and costs a whopping $38.000 per ship. However, the new generation sailors saw fit for a millennial-ready tool: the 30$ X-box controller from that children's’ playstore around the corner. When gaming, you’re looking at a virtual world, a simulation of fiction, or perhaps another reality. But for these sailors, the gaming-interface now shows the real world: an eye on the surface, moved with the familiar taps and twists of their childhood-controllers. Training times for these sailors decreased to minutes. We all know how they work, why wouldn’t we apply them beyond our comfy couches, right?Video game controllers are just one of many innovations the Navy is using as it transitions into the 21st century. It’s already using virtual-reality simulators to train sailors, and exploring technology like 3D printing and robotic underwater drones. Games become jobs! [post_title] => Games become jobs: Looking through the eye of the submarine with an X-Box controller [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => x-box-controllers-operate-submarine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-17 11:38:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-17 10:38:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81206 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 80592 [post_author] => 872 [post_date] => 2018-03-01 10:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-01 09:00:22 [post_content] => Robots are coming for our jobs. Virtual reality is coming to make the jobs that remain easier to accomplish.All of the world’s manufacturing sectors are in the process of applying VR to the dizzying number of tasks required all up and down the supply chain — from handling raw materials to shipping goods off to end-users. Don’t be surprised if the future of manufacturing looks quite a bit different than it does today thanks to this up-and-coming — and quickly maturing — technology.

Inventory Management

If you’ve never worked in a warehouse before, it might be difficult to imagine how useful virtual reality could be for the “picking” of orders. In shipment facilities, for example, several products may be gathered at once to be shipped together in the same container. In a FedEx or DHL facility, picking involves choosing the correct shipment from many, at the right time, and seeing it on toward the next part of the chain of custody.The previous version of this paradigm required “pickers” to juggle handheld RFID or barcode scanners, sometimes while operating heavy machinery or dollies simultaneously. Virtual reality delivers the most important task-related information while keeping our hands unencumbered. Amazon.com and the U.S. Postal Service are already frighteningly efficient at what they do — virtual reality should boost their productivity and accuracy even further.

Training

Many of the global industries which still rely on physical labor in a major way are in the midst of a labor shortage. Simply put, we have a lot of semi-skilled positions available and not enough semi-skilled persons to fill them. The fact that college becomes more prohibitively expensive each year isn’t helping things. Amazingly, VR may soon play a central role in the employee training and onboarding processes.New hires can receive more tailored, relevant and, most importantly, workflow-friendly training prompts as they learn the ropes. This type of immersive learning is frequently credited with better recall later on, so imagine the potential when VR delivers not dry classroom learning, but instead context- and graphics-rich training materials right when you need them most. It might even preside over a kind of renaissance in on-site “apprenticeship-style” training, where learning is put to use immediately and with the benefit of real-world context.

Maintenance

General Electric paired with software company Upskill recently to demonstrate the benefits VR can bring to general maintenance. It’s a timely example, too: they proved that wind turbine workers could deliver productivity improvements of nearly 35 percent with assistance from VR. This is compared with the benchmark of “traditional” and VR-less turbine wiring techniques.For wind turbine technicians, this is less a “maintenance” application and more a “day-to-day” type of thing. Nevertheless, the concept readily applies to a great deal of the duplicable, repetitive and frequently necessary upkeep tasks needed by modern machinery and facilities of all kinds.

Floor Plan Optimization

Building a brand-new facility from scratch or designing upgrades for an existing structure are both difficult and time-intensive tasks you don’t want to get wrong the first time around. Whether you need to choose locations for stationary manufacturing or material handling equipment or you just need to come up with a more natural workflow for your employees, virtual reality is here to help you out.Interior decorators have allowed consumers to play with top-down views of their homes to digitally arrange dining room tables and loveseats for some time now. It lets us, as it were, adjust the “digital Feng Shui” of our homes and workplaces before plunking down the cash on new furnishings. Virtual reality will take this concept to its logical next step.Imagine manipulating equipment and furniture not in two dimensions, but in three. Picture yourself walking through a totally virtual wireframe representation of what your new building could look like. Imagine how much easier the trial and error if it all could be with VR giving us a new pair of eyes.As you can see, there likely isn’t a single part of the manufacturing process that won’t be touched in some way by the advent of more mature virtual reality technology. That’s a step forward we can all get behind._________________________Looking for more stories? Join NNN and we will keep you in the know on everything next nature, all around the world! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Here’s what manufacturing enhanced with virtual reality will look like [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virtual-manufacturing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-08 18:34:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-08 17:34:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=80592 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79179 [post_author] => 872 [post_date] => 2017-12-17 10:00:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-17 09:00:08 [post_content] => The modern world is only just now starting to come to terms with the idea of fully immersive digital experiences. We're not talking about the kind you get sitting in front of a screen, playing games or watching media. We’re talking about entering a digital space via virtual reality or augmented reality tech.It’s clear the technology is about to disrupt many industries as it advances in capability. Imagine a VR system to give military personnel real-world, hands-on experiences without ever leaving an in-country facility. Or, envision AR tools that help construction and project managers visualize a property or structure before it’s complete.These examples are not pipe dreams, either. Major brands such as Facebook, Amazon, Google and even Microsoft are heavily investing in the necessary technologies and their experiences. You see, that’s the next hurdle. It’s not just about having the technology - or devices - to allow this sort of thing. It’s also about crafting and developing the experiences to make it happen - in other words, the software to go along with the hardware.Here’s where the driving idea behind AI or VR in architecture and engineering comes into play.

Custom and unique experiences abound

It’s no secret companies will need to develop, maintain and perfect virtual experiences for various industries. Some have a greater advantage than others - for example, the military can take several bits of inspiration from the gaming world. You could argue architecture, engineering and design could do the same, borrowing from the sweeping builds you see in modern video games, such as Assassin’s Creed Unity in Paris, or Tom Clancy’s The Division in a post-apocalyptic New York.We can expect to see many new opportunities in terms of immersive experiences and environments. One of the obvious examples of AR in architecture is using the tech to visualize projects and designs. BIM, or building information models, can benefit greatly from a more digital investment, such as one you get from a VR experience. Interested parties could enter the digital space, manipulate objects and scenery and even view concepts as full-scale recreations.AR and VR augment and improve the tasks of existing professionals in the workforce, but they also make things a whole lot more modern and interesting for younger generations. Millennials, for example, may be more attracted to various trades and professions that have implemented modern technologies.There’s another aspect we’d be remiss not to mention. These technologies will also alter the way - and environments - in which we work.

The office of the future

Tired of working in a cramped cubicle, or middle office? Pretty soon, you might be able to don a pair of AR or VR glasses and enter a completely different world. Imagine working on the shores of a sunny beach, for instance. What about chilling in a boat, out on a calm lake, with a fishing pole at your side?Companies like Mure VR are already crafting these kinds of unique and alien experiences that let you enter a whole new environment. Want to work in the isolated, quiet confines of outer space? No problem! Want to sit inside a deep-positioned submarine? It’s possible. The opportunities are endless.More importantly, the options are coming. Pretty soon, these examples will be more than just theoretical; we will have the technology in our hands, to do anything we can imagine.

The way we work and interact is evolving

Alongside those unique experiences will come a new form of work or organization. Employees and personnel will need to build the experience and skills to work in these new environments. The varying formats such technologies can offer call for a need to familiarize oneself with a digital landscape, as opposed to a physical one. For example, we’ll need to learn the difference between working with a virtual desktop and a physical one.It’s not only possible, however. It’s probable. In fact, AR is expected to claim $83 billion in market share by 2021, with VR taking $25 billion, for a total somewhere between $94 and $122 billion. It’s growing, and fast, which means these kinds of experiences and tools will be here before you know it.Image: Arch Daily [post_title] => AI & VR Impact on Architects and Engineers [post_excerpt] => Future workspace, human interaction and unique experiences: here’s how artificial intelligence and VR impact on architects and engineers. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ai-vr-impact-architects-engineers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 11:14:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 10:14:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79179/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78954 [post_author] => 872 [post_date] => 2017-12-04 10:00:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-04 09:00:36 [post_content] => Working from home is accepted more openly these days, and with modern technology, why not? You can have a conference or video meetings with everyone from your office, while you sit at home in your PJs. However, imagine being able to attend work and meetings, as well as operate in a professional environment from anywhere - and not just by taking your work laptop to a coffee shop or remote location. We are talking about actually entering the work environment you are used to, thanks to a digital representation of reality. It sounds crazy, but it’s entirely possible with technologies like augmented reality and virtual reality.

Why is this technology beneficial?

Even if you work from an office, you can use these technologies to visit and interact with remote locations and remote personnel or partners. For instance, you could have a virtual reality meeting with a potential client who lives halfway around the world - but you’re communicating as though you were together in person in an actual office.Between 60% to 70% of consumers believe there are clear benefits for using AR and IoT devices in their daily lives, including at work. At work, 69% believe the devices will be beneficial for training programs, while 65% think they can be used to increase safety. A further 64% believe AR can improve interactions through remote engagements and environments.These ideas offer an alarming yet welcome look at how the physical office will change in the future, maybe even sooner than we expect. Like the mobile has done, these technologies will connect people worldwide and change the ways we all communicate.

Unprecedented office experiences are coming

No one enjoys sitting in a cramped cubicle, but sometimes it is necessary, especially when a business is limited on space. However, less-than-ideal workspaces can often affect performance - and not necessarily in a good way.Stuck inside dealing with fluorescent, ugly lighting all day? You could jump into a VR office, set outside in the sun, with the wind blowing in your hair. This kind of thing would do wonders not just for productivity, but also for employee satisfaction.Taking its use one step further, companies and businesses could operate remotely, with employees separated by hundreds or thousands of miles. All workers could check in via a VR or digital platform, interacting with one another as if they were all in the same building or room. This allows for more opportunities in human resources, too. Imagine hiring a professional at the top of their field who had no interest in relocating to your local area.High Fidelity is one company that’s already at the forefront of the virtual workplace, trying to bridge the gap between a digital fantasy-like working environment and the physical world. Mure VR’s Breakroom is another example of the modern office going digital.

Development and support is crucial

The major concern is development support. A developer or engineer has to craft these experiences first. That means custom or proprietary experiences deployed by modern business will need to have a fully supportive development team.It’s going to take time to make these virtual experiences and environments possible. The good news, at least, is that many of us are ready - 66% of workers revealed they are open to the concept of using VR or AR tech in their workplace.Image: vSpatial_______________________Do you want to stay up to date about the latest next nature news? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Make the World Your Office [post_excerpt] => Imagine being able to enter your office through a digital representation of reality. It sounds crazy, but it’s possible with augmented and virtual reality. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => make-world-office [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 11:14:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 10:14:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78954/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78141 [post_author] => 872 [post_date] => 2017-11-02 15:49:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-02 13:49:16 [post_content] => Artificial intelligence, or AI, has changed the way we shop online by giving suggestions for things we may want to buy based on past purchases. It has also altered how we send and receive emails, since many platforms automatically filter messages by importance or give suggested responses due to our habits. It should come as no surprise, then, that AI naturally extends into the way we work. Let's look at how artificial intelligence is influencing the way we relate to work.

AI has changed how we search for jobs

Google is the first place many people go when searching for jobs. Now, thanks to a recent update that utilizes AI technology, locating relevant employment postings through the search engine is even simpler. Using a service called Google for Jobs, you can enter the preferred position and location on Google and receive a list of possibilities without having to sign up at the job websites that are advertising the openings.In this case, AI is simplifying the often-arduous job search process and helping people find relevant job openings in a more centralized manner.

AI changes how we work and the tasks we carry out

There are also many ways AI impacts what we do while at work. AI has already proven it is excellent for repetitive tasks. Some insurance companies use it to streamline the claims process and deploy chatbots to ease the workload of human customer service agents, for example. One argument against AI asserts that the technology lacks empathy. That means it won't ever be able to perform the same way as a doctor, trying to calm a frightened patient or an irate customer that has experienced too many faults with a product or service and has run out of patience.But, it is certain that future workforce must learn how AI can supplement skills in meaningful ways to succeed in the workplace of the future. The technology exists, and it is being used with increasing frequency to help employees complete repetitive tasks and allow them to focus on other activities instead.

Today’s technologies create opportunities for those with the necessary skills

Experts also assert that people with skills related to AI and associated technologies, such as robotics, will enjoy strong employment outlooks. They'll command more job flexibility, better salaries and other perks that are not available to people who do not have the same knowledge and have not been able or willing to adapt.New technologies require people to learn new things. It's smart for workers to increase their knowledge base on their own. However, employers can also help fill the gap by ensuring their workers do not get left behind.Some notable brands, such as eBay and Electronic Arts, are also turning to AI to measure employee performance. They tap into technology and make predictions about things ranging from absenteeism to whether a commute time will adversely affect performance. Theoretically, employers could also use the resources at their disposal to see where skills growth needs to occur, allowing workers to nimbly change with the times.Artificial intelligence, robotics and similar technologies have become integrated into the way of life for the modern workforce. Employees who do not realize that and improve themselves accordingly may find it difficult to succeed in the workplace. [post_title] => What You Should Know About Artificial Intelligence Changing Jobs [post_excerpt] => It should come as no surprise that artificial intelligence naturally extends into the way we work. Let's look at how AI changes the way we relate to work. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => artificial-intelligence-changing-jobs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 10:31:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 09:31:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78141/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78167 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-10-27 09:46:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-27 07:46:03 [post_content] => Now that organ printing is a reality, we can start designing body parts as well. As an organ designer, you develop genetic algorithms from which organs are grown to perfectly fit the recipient’s body, but also to meet the personal wishes of the patient. From a liver replacement or a new heart valve, to an extra sense to communicate with a dolphin. You imagine it, you design it. Nothing is too challenging for you. Are you interested in this job? Take the job test and find out if this working position suits you.The organ designer is portrayed by British artist Agi Haines, whose work investigates the potential of our body as a raw material for our engineering fantasies and speculates on the impact of biomedical technologies on the human form. Last year we spoke with her about body modification, science fiction, medical futures and more. Read the interview here. [post_title] => HUBOT: Meet the Organ Designer [post_excerpt] => As an organ designer, you develop genetic algorithms from which organs are grown to perfectly fit the recipient’s body, but also to meet the personal wishes of the patient. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => organ-designer-hubot [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 10:39:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 09:39:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78167/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77205 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 10:11:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 08:11:42 [post_content] => Imagine a future where you can design your own vegetables. Say goodbye to growing boring baby sprouts on your windowsill and welcome a climate-controlled cultivation system to your kitchen top. Simply change the parameters of your crops with a touchscreen interface and you’ll be on your way. Sounds good, does it? This growing scenario does not exist yet, but food designer and NNN fellow Chloé Rutzerveld is looking for innovative methods to turn this fantasy into a reality. Introducing the Future Food Formula, a formula for success.[caption id="attachment_77372" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Future Food Formula installation.[/caption]Consider this, humans are technological by nature. You would be surprised to hear that cooking is the first technology humans ever conceived. This invention allowed our ancestors to pre-digest food before eating it, which led to bigger brains and basically let evolution do its part by turning them into the modern human beings we are today. This would explain our constant need to search for smarter, more efficient and more sustainable ways to produce our food (remember Bistro In Vitro?). After all, a population of 7.5 billion people is not easy to feed.With this in mind, Chloé Rutzerveld explored the process of growing - or to be more precise, designing - crops, based on scientific facts, to model the outcome into an interactive installation: Future Food Formula. While doing so, she teamed up with researchers from the University of Wageningen and the Association for Vertical Farming, and payed a visit to leading tech company Phillips. Every time she visited a researchers, she asked this simple question: what exactly influences crops? And how can we manipulate this without using GMO’s?[caption id="attachment_77370" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Future Food Formula opening.[/caption]“It’s about education” the designer says. “It’s important for us to understand to which extent natural processes affect our crops; these processes keep the vegetation stable”. Chloé single-handedly created charts to map the parameters that determine crops outcome and wondered what would happen if she could convert that knowledge into new crop variations:“I looked into the growth processes of crops and considered their functionalities: how do crops respond to light? Or to warmth? Having obtained this information, I discovered that I was able to adjust the nutritional values of our crops, but also the taste, color, size etc. It was exciting to discover the endless possibilities to create new crops by simply using nature - and technology enabled me to cope with these factors. This is not a new thing, when modern farmers grow crops in laboratories, efficiency stands first. It’s no a coincidence if tomatoes have that specific red-warm color!”.[caption id="attachment_77371" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Setting the parameters to design vegetables.[/caption]Chloé transformed the crop data into 2D drawings, then she collaborated with RNDR to animate them. This way the visitors of the installation gain a playful understanding of the growing processes of vegetables. “Imagine a future where everyone has his own cultivation system on his kitchen top, this would turn consumers into operating green-keepers” the designer explains. “Downloading and upvoting such recipes to a certain database, would give producers an insight into consumers’ demands”.Partial speculation, partial science, Chloé’s vision promises an exciting future for our diet and cooking appliances. It may as well be a matter of time before her growing methods would available in a kitchen near you. Until then, we advise you to visit Future Food Formula and discover what does it mean to have vegetables on your fingertips.You can visit Future Food Formula at RAUM in Utrecht, The Netherlands, where Chloé Rutzerveld has been artist-in-residence over the last few months. The installation will be open until October 17, every Wednesday afternoon (15:00 - 18:00) and Sunday (12:00 - 18:00). After this exhibition, the installation will travel to the Dutch Design Week as part of the Embassy of Food exhibition at the Ketelhuisplein in Eindhoven. DDW runs from October 21 until October 29.Photography: Bram Saeys. Cover image: Stef ArendsDo you want to stay up to date about the NNN fellows and other NNN news? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Design Your Own Vegetables [post_excerpt] => With her project Future Food Formula, food designer Chloé Rutzerveld is looking for innovative methods to design vegetables. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-vegetables [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-21 15:48:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-21 13:48:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77205/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 125108 [post_author] => 2194 [post_date] => 2019-10-29 12:43:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-29 11:43:03 [post_content] =>

Emma is in poor health. She has painful varicose veins, stress-related eczema, puffy skin, a grey complexion, red eyes and a hunch-back. She is an imagined office worker of the future — a morbid life-sized doll that forecasts the impact of office work on human evolution. According researchers at Fellowes, if we don’t do something, Emma could resemble most of your colleagues in 20-years time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=fL5SuzGkUPw

Indeed, Emma embodies the evolutionary impact of our current work culture on the human body. Apparently, our humble office chairs are the biggest culprits - all together we spend an average of eight years of our life sitting down, which will gradually disfigure our bodies and weaken our muscles permanently. Additionally, trading sunlight for artificial light will lead to poor vision and chronic vitamin deficiency. This information may not be new, but being confronted with Emma certainly is.

How can we avoid this fate? Fellowes’ research suggests radical changes to our current ways of working. This means more walk-and-talk meetings, regular breaks, spaces in the office for exercise and relaxation, as well as different types of desks and work spaces that support our bodies.

This hyper-real rendering of a future office protagonist may indeed shock us into action. Emma also serves as a stark reminder of how, as much as we like to think we can use technology to shape the world around us for our needs, technology itself plays an active role in shaping us. How natural is it to sit in an office chair, staring at a computer for eight hours a day?

This story of evolution reveals how intertwined nature and technology can be, how our interactions with the things we make can literally transform our physicality, intervene in our development and influence the ‘natural’ biological processes of our bodies. We can no longer underestimate how, in some cases, we serve technology just as much as it serves us. 

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