76 results for “Organized-Networks”

Your Next Nature guide to Transmediale 2019

NextNature.net
January 18th 2019

Berlin is kicking off its cultural season with the not-to-miss 23th installment of Transmediale. This year the digital art/culture festival focuses on how feelings are made into objects of technological design, and asks what role emotions and empathy play within digital culture.

We combed the program so you don't have to:

How to Grow and Use Your Feelers (Workshop. Wednesday from 11:00 to 14:00

Donna Harrway's writings inspired the interdisciplinary techno-feminist research group #purplenoise to immerse us in a world …

Ramen: the New Prison Currency

Ruben Baart
September 4th 2016
Instant ramen noodles have become a valuable commodity to inmates, as cost-cutting measures in US prisons led to the deterioration of food quality.

The Complex Networks of Our Planet

Margherita Olivo
April 25th 2016
This video by Nature explains the complexity of networks on our planet.

New Friends? Let Social Textiles Help You

Yunus Emre Duyar
February 26th 2015
A group of students at the MIT Media Lab are working on an electronic textile that might help us interact with people more easily.

A Conversation with Kevin Kelly

Van Mensvoort
February 5th 2014
Buckle up for a 1:11:28 interview with technology philosopher and founding editor of Wired Magazine, Kevin Kelly.

Let the Drones take care of the Biosphere

Van Mensvoort
January 4th 2014

Drones are typically thought of as flying spying robots, or even worse flying spying shooting robots. But could we also employ drones for good? The people of conversationdrones.org employ drones to survey wildlife, monitor ecosystems and guard protected areas.

Although there is still a 'boys with toys' element to the practice, the idea to employ the technosphere to support the biosphere must be applauded.…

Interact with Friends (in Real Life) with Facebook Monopoly

Alessia Andreotti
July 25th 2013
A Facebook version of Monopoly forces players to interact with each other in meatspace.

The Interspecies Internet

Van Mensvoort
July 16th 2013
Could the internet be expanded to include sentient species like apes, dolphins and elephants?

What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks

Deborah Gordon
July 10th 2013

Ever notice how ant colonies so successfully explore and exploit resources in the world … to find food at 4th of July picnics, for example? You may find it annoying. But as an ecologist who studies ants and collective behavior, I think it’s intriguing — especially the fact that it’s all done without any central control.

What’s especially remarkable: the close parallels between ant colonies’ networks and human-engineered ones. One example is “Anternet”, where we, a group of researchers at …

Free Solar Chargers in the Streets of NY

Alessia Andreotti
July 5th 2013
Solar chargers for everyday emergencies.
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Berlin is kicking off its cultural season with the not-to-miss 23th installment of Transmediale. This year the digital art/culture festival focuses on how feelings are made into objects of technological design, and asks what role emotions and empathy play within digital culture.

We combed the program so you don't have to:

How to Grow and Use Your Feelers (Workshop. Wednesday from 11:00 to 14:00

Donna Harrway's writings inspired the interdisciplinary techno-feminist research group #purplenoise to immerse us in a world of “feelers” as symbols for an extended human sensorium.

Algorithmic Intimacies (Talk. Saturday from 12:00 to 13:30)

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life, yet there's a deficit in current understandings of how technologies are used within algorithmic intimacies. In this talk, fembots, virtual assistants and dating apps are discussed to reflect upon how today’s algorithmic lives are felt.

Knitting and Knotting Love (Keynote. Saturday from 18:00 to 19:30)

How do you love? And how is this love traversed through networks? In their performative lecture at transmediale 2019, Shaka McGlotten tracks a networked experience of love.

Alter Media (Screening. Saturday from 19:30 to 21:30)

From global connectedness bridging unimaginable distances to data abuse, automated opinion manipulation and unrestrained marketing strategies. This screening depicts a broad spectrum of lived experiences with the media spheres of our time.

Actress + Young Paint (live AI/AV) (Performance. Saturday from 21:30 to 22:30)

Meet the AI-based character that spends its time programming Actress’ sonic palette. Expect a life-size projection of the AI working in a virtual studio, coming together with a physical performance on stage.

Cover image: Rory Pilgrim, Software Garden, 2018. Courtesty of the artist and andriesse-eyck galerie Some rights reserved. (Performance: Friday from 20:00 to 21:00)

Transmediale 2019 takes place from 31 January to 3 February 2019 at Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Tickets.

[post_title] => Your Next Nature guide to Transmediale 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => your-next-nature-guide-to-transmediale-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-18 14:14:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-18 13:14:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=107665 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 65658 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-09-04 20:24:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-04 18:24:17 [post_content] => After cigarettes, postage stamps and mackerel, a new currency emerged in US prisons: instant ramen noodles. A new study found out that ramen became a valuable commodity to inmates, as cost-cutting measures in US prisons led to the deterioration of food quality. The noodle currency is used for trading food, clothes, hygiene products and services.A new report by Michael Gibson-Light, doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona School of Sociology, revealed how the rise of ramen value was a result of defunded prison services. After spending 12 months researching at a state prison, the author spoke to 50 inmates and seven staff members. "There was an entire informal economy based on ramen" he said.The noodles, often referred to as 'soups', became a vital part of the black market since the beginning of 2000, control over food service switched to one private company to another. “With that change that resulted in a reduction in the quantity of the food the inmates were receiving” Gibson-Light explained. "Inmates shared countless grievances about serving sizes as well as the quality, taste or healthiness of the food".Keeping in mind the recommended daily intake of calories is 2.400-2.800 a day for men, and 1.800-2.000 for women, both the quality and the quantity of food service had immensely decreased. Instead of getting three hot meals a day, "the second meal was reduced in size and changed to cold-cut sandwiches and a small bag of chips. Lunch was completely removed from weekend menus and portion sizes in every meal were reduced" the author said. Some facilities have cut down the cost to as low as 15 cents a meal.At a price of 59 cents, the noodle currency is worth much more. A sweatshirt that costs roughly ten dollars would be purchased at a price of two packs of ramen. “One way or another, everything in prison is about money” a prisoner says in the report. Even though the research utilizes only one prison as its case study, a 2015 “Prison Ramen” cookbook by a former inmate confirms the durability of the Asian delicacy. Ramen is the New Black.Sources: The Guardian, NPR [post_title] => Ramen: the New Prison Currency [post_excerpt] => Instant ramen noodles have become a valuable commodity to inmates, as cost-cutting measures in US prisons led to the deterioration of food quality. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ramen-prison-currency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-06 12:13:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-06 11:13:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65658 [menu_order] => 84 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63147 [post_author] => 864 [post_date] => 2016-04-25 16:00:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-25 14:00:48 [post_content] => Our planet is composed of millions of networks. The balance between the animal species and their habitats. The migrations in history. The financial flows between countries and continents. Everything that happens in the world, on a microscopic scale as well as globally, is potentially describable as a set of mathematical functions. The more accurate they are, the more useful they will be to depict not only the present but also the future reality.Understanding the complexity and the logic behind these systems and predicting possible consequences of the extinction of a particular species, for example, was almost impossible. Until now. There is a whole branch of physics devoted to studying the relationships between the various systems, the so-called complex networks.This five-minute data visualization by Mauro Martino, head of the Cognitive Visualization Lab for IBM Watson, and Jianxi Gao, researcher at Northeastern University, will give you the opportunity to understand these networks. The project is what Martino calls a "data-film", a video able to visualize complicated scientific and statistical ideas through animation."The image of four lines is not as seductive as a dynamic network or a 3-D planet full of links" Martino says. "But I tried to force people to look at the reality, that the beauty of a discovery can be found in predicting when a simple line breaks, that the beauty is in understanding what's behind that line". Source: Nature [post_title] => The Complex Networks of Our Planet [post_excerpt] => This video by Nature explains the complexity of networks on our planet. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => complex-networks-planet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-24 13:15:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-24 11:15:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63147 [menu_order] => 266 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 43247 [post_author] => 835 [post_date] => 2015-02-26 16:00:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-26 15:00:17 [post_content] => Although social media helps us connect with more people in a highly efficient way, the act is still far from real human interaction. We share posts, upload photos or post status updates, looking frantically at our screens for likes, shares or comments. A group of students at the MIT Media Lab, named Fluid Interfaces Group, is working on an electronic textile that might help us interact with people based on our social media profiles.With the intent "to design and develop interfaces that are a more natural extension of our minds, bodies and behavior", the team is working on a project named Social Textiles. The technology depends on a smartphone app, thermochromatic ink and haptics to create a seamless experience of interaction with people.The Social Textile is connected to the app via Bluetooth. After putting on the T-shirt and going outside, you get a gentle "haptic" tap on your shoulder if there is anyone else with the Social Textile on. This is a signal by a computer chip for you to look around. When you locate the person, you greet them with a handshake or a high five. The skin contact creates a small electric charge, which will activate the thermochromatic ink on your T-shirts. If you have any interests in common, the ink will spell it out for you. This means that you can avoid the awkward talk about weather conditions and get right into your common interests.You can check the video below for more explanation on how the system works.[vimeo 118489711 w=530&h=280]

Story via Discovery News, image via Ecouterre

[post_title] => New Friends? Let Social Textiles Help You [post_excerpt] => A group of students at the MIT Media Lab are working on an electronic textile that might help us interact with people more easily. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-friends-let-social-textiles-help-you [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-26 14:28:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-26 13:28:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=43247 [menu_order] => 762 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38065 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2014-02-05 10:20:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-05 09:20:41 [post_content] => You have a choice dear reader: spend 3 seconds scanning this blogpost, or spend the full 1:11:28 minutes listening to the interview John Brockman did with technology philosopher and founding editor of Wired Magazine, Kevin Kelly.The interview touches upon the nature of technology, big data, surveillance society, money as a medium, techno-literacy and the question whether the universe is analog or digital.The video is best experienced as radio, or you can read the transcript here. [post_title] => A Conversation with Kevin Kelly [post_excerpt] => Buckle up for a 1:11:28 interview with technology philosopher and founding editor of Wired Magazine, Kevin Kelly. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-conversation-with-kevin-kelly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-05 12:06:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-05 11:06:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38065 [menu_order] => 1117 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37680 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2014-01-04 01:16:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-04 00:16:56 [post_content] => [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIrgjCNcDBI[/youtube]Drones are typically thought of as flying spying robots, or even worse flying spying shooting robots. But could we also employ drones for good? The people of conversationdrones.org employ drones to survey wildlife, monitor ecosystems and guard protected areas.Although there is still a 'boys with toys' element to the practice, the idea to employ the technosphere to support the biosphere must be applauded. [post_title] => Let the Drones take care of the Biosphere [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => let-the-drones-take-care-of-the-biosphere [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-01-03 15:17:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-01-03 14:17:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37680 [menu_order] => 1145 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35350 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-07-25 10:00:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-25 08:00:42 [post_content] => With Facebook: The Board Game, American graphic designer Pat C. Klein brings social media to the real world. The artist reinvented the most classic board game, Monopoly, by replacing houses, hotels, streets, Chance and Community Chest with the famous activities of Zuckerberg's social network.Klein’s goal is to get people to interact with each other in person, tackling the digital life and the web omnipresence. As he explains:"As a young person living in the digital age, I feel as though the internet is affecting our ability to communicate with one another. Research done by Stanford University has indicated that social networking sites like Facebook can increase loneliness, depression and insecurity. Facebook: The Board Game was created as a response to this. The idea is that instead of engaging with Facebook on your computer or phone, you can arrange to meet up with friends, have a few drinks and play in real life".The result is a white and blue board where Jail was changed into Account Suspended, GO became Collect a free “like” card, Go to Jail turned into Forgot Log-in and Free Parking into Refresh Page. What about the game pieces? The game pieces are us!So, when a player lands on Status he has to share good news or reveal future plans. The box Video forces to watch a video with somebody. Features like Events encourage to plan a gathering with another player.Klein had fun adding a “sadistic” note to the game, with repercussions in real life. For instance, Unattended PC allows a player to reveal something embarrassing about the next person to leave the room, while Break Up forces people in relationship to break up. As they say: life is a game! [post_title] => Interact with Friends (in Real Life) with Facebook Monopoly [post_excerpt] => A Facebook version of Monopoly forces players to interact with each other in meatspace. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interact-with-friends-in-real-life-with-facebook-monopoly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-25 11:22:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-25 09:22:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35350 [menu_order] => 1329 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35180 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2013-07-16 10:25:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-16 08:25:33 [post_content] => [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGMLhaa98GI[/youtube]Apes, dolphins and elephants are animals with remarkable communication skills. Could the internet be expanded to include sentient species like them?Dolphin researcher Diana Reiss, musician Peter Gabriel, internet of things visionary Neil Gershenfeld and Vint Cerf, one of the fathers of the internet discussed this remarkable developing idea at TED. [post_title] => The Interspecies Internet [post_excerpt] => Could the internet be expanded to include sentient species like apes, dolphins and elephants? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-interspecies-internet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-16 10:25:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-16 08:25:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35180 [menu_order] => 1341 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35056 [post_author] => 813 [post_date] => 2013-07-10 09:48:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-10 08:48:10 [post_content] => Ever notice how ant colonies so successfully explore and exploit resources in the world … to find food at 4th of July picnics, for example? You may find it annoying. But as an ecologist who studies ants and collective behavior, I think it’s intriguing — especially the fact that it’s all done without any central control.What’s especially remarkable: the close parallels between ant colonies’ networks and human-engineered ones. One example is “Anternet”, where we, a group of researchers at Stanford, found that the algorithm desert ants use to regulate foraging is like the Traffic Control Protocol (TCP) used to regulate data traffic on the internet. Both ant and human networks use positive feedback: either from acknowledgements that trigger the transmission of the next data packet, or from food-laden returning foragers that trigger the exit of another outgoing forager.This research led some to marvel at the ingenuity of ants, able to invent systems familiar to us: wow, ants have been using internet algorithms for millions of years!But insect behavior mimicking human networks — another example are the ant-like solutions to the traveling salesman problem provided by the ant colony optimization algorithm — is actually not what’s most interesting about ant networks. What’s far more interesting are the parallels in the other direction: What have the ants worked out that we humans haven’t thought of yet?[pullquote]During the 130 million years or so that ants have been around, evolution has tuned ant colony algorithms.[/pullquote]During the 130 million years or so that ants have been around, evolution has tuned ant colony algorithms to deal with the variability and constraints set by specific environments.Ant colonies use dynamic networks of brief interactions to adjust to changing conditions. No individual ant knows what’s going on. Each ant just keeps track of its recent experience meeting other ants, either in one-on-one encounters when ants touch antennae, or when an ant encounters a chemical deposited by another.Such networks have made possible the phenomenal diversity and abundance of more than 11,000 ant species in every conceivable habitat on Earth. So Anternet, and other ant networks, have a lot to teach us. Ant protocols may suggest ways to build our own information networks…

Dealing with High Operating Costs

Harvester ant colonies in the desert must spend water to get water. The ants lose water when foraging in the hot sun, and get their water by metabolizing it out of the seeds that they collect. Since colonies store seeds, their system of positive feedback doesn’t waste foraging effort when water costs are high — even if it means they leave some seeds “on the table” (or rather, ground) to be obtained on another, more humid day.In this way, the Anternet allows the colony to deal with high operating costs. In the internet, the TCP protocol also prevents the system from sending data out on the internet when there’s no bandwidth available. Effort would be wasted if the message is lost, so it’s not worth sending it out unless it’s certain to reach its destination.More recently, I’ve shown how natural selection is currently optimizing the Anternet algorithm. I’ve been following a population of 300 harvester ant colonies for more than 25 years, and by using genetic fingerprinting we figured out which colonies had more offspring colonies.Colonies store food inside the nest as a survival tactic. On especially hot days, colonies that are likely to lay low instead of collecting more food are the ones that have more offspring colonies over their 25-year lifetimes. Restraint therefore emerges as the best strategy at the colony level. Long-lived colonies in the desert regulate their behavior not to maximize or optimize food intake, but instead to keep going without wasting resources.In the face of scarcity, the algorithm that regulates the flow of ants is evolving toward minimizing operating costs rather than immediate accumulation. This is a sustainable strategy for any system, like a desert ant colony or the mobile internet, where it’s essential to achieve long-term reliability while avoiding wasted effort.

Scaling Up from Small to Large Systems

What happens when a system scales up? Like human-engineered systems, ant systems must be robust to scale up as the colony grows, and they have to be able to tolerate the failure of individual components.Since large systems allow for some messiness, the ideal solutions utilize the contributions of each additional ant in such a way that the benefit of an extra worker outweighs the cost of producing and feeding one.The tools that serve large colonies well, therefore, are redundancy and minimal information. Enormous ant colonies function using very simple interactions among nameless ants without any address.In engineered systems we too are searching for ways to ensure reliable outcomes, as our networks scale, by using cheap operations that make use of randomness. Elegant top-down designs are appealing, but the robustness of ant algorithms shows that tolerating imperfection sometimes leads to better solutions.

Optimizing for First-Mover Advantage

The diversity of ant algorithms shows how evolution has responded to different environmental constraints. When operating costs are low and colonies seek an ephemeral delicacy — like flower nectar or watermelon rinds — searching speed is essential if the colony is to capture the prize before it dries up or is taken away.[pullquote]In the face of scarcity, the algorithm that regulates the flow of ants is evolving toward minimizing operating costs rather than immediate accumulation.[/pullquote]Since ant colonies compete with each other and many are out looking for the same food, the first colony to arrive might have the best chance of holding on to the food and keeping the other ants away.How does a colony achieve this first-mover advantage without any central control? The challenge in this situation is for the colony to manage the flow of ants so it has an ant almost everywhere almost all the time. The goal is to increase the likelihood that some ant will be close enough to encounter whatever happens to show up.One strategy ants use (familiar from our own data networks) is to set up a circuit of permanent highways — like a network of cell phone towers — from which ants search locally. The invasive Argentine ants are experts at this; they’ll find any crumb that lands on your kitchen counter.The Argentine ants also adjust their paths, shifting from a close to random walk when there are lots of ants around, leading each ant to search thoroughly in a small area, to a straighter path when there are few ants around, thus allowing the whole group to cover more ground.Like a distributed demand-response network, the aggregated responses of each ant to local conditions generates the outcome for the whole system, without any centralized direction or control.

Addressing Security Breaches and Disasters

In the tropics, where hundreds of ant species are packed close together and competing for resources, colonies must deal with security problems. This has led to the evolution of security protocols that use local information for intrusion detection and for response.One colony might use (“borrow” or “steal”, as humans would say) information from another, such as chemical trails or the density of ants, to find and use resources.Rather than attempting to prevent incursions completely, however, ants create loose, stochastic identity systems in which one species regulates its behavior in response to the level of incursion from another.There are obvious parallels with computer security. It’s becoming clear (consider recent events!) that we too will need to implement local evaluation and repair of intrusions, tolerating some level of imperfection. The ants have found ways to let their systems respond to each others’ incursions, without attempting to set up a central authority that regulates hacks.[pullquote]Ants have evolved security protocols that use local information for intrusion detection and response.[/pullquote]Some of our networks seem to be moving toward using methods deployed by the ants.Take the disaster recovery protocols of ants that forage in trees where branches can break, so the threat of rupture is high. A ring network, with signals or ants flowing in both directions, allows for rapid recovery here; after a break in the flow in one direction, the flow in the other direction can re-establish a link.Similarly, early fiber-optic cable networks were often disrupted by farm machinery and other digging: one break could bring down the system because it would isolate every load. Engineers soon discovered, as ants have already done, that ring networks would create networks that are easier to repair.***Our networks will continue to change and evolve. By examining and comparing the algorithms used by ants in the desert, in the tropical forest, and the invasive species that visit our kitchens, it’s already obvious that the ants have come up with new solutions that can teach us something about how we should engineer our systems.Using simple interactions like the brief touch of antennae — not unlike our fleeting status updates in ephemeral social networks — colonies make networks that respond to a world that constantly changes, with resources that show up in patches and then disappear. These networks are easy to repair and can grow or shrink.Ant colonies have been used throughout history as models of industry, obedience, and wisdom. Although the ants themselves can be indolent, inconsiderate of others, and downright stupid, we have much to learn from ant colony protocols. The ants have evolved ways of working together that we haven’t yet dreamed of.Story via Wired. Image Shutterstock. [post_title] => What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-ant-colony-networks-can-tell-us-about-what%e2%80%99s-next-for-digital-networks [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:09:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:09:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35056 [menu_order] => 1349 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 34837 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-07-05 11:00:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-05 09:00:04 [post_content] => A new device is appearing in the New York skyline: a free mobile charging station, powered entirely by the sun. At the beginning of this summer, AT&T, the solar technology company Goal Zero and the Brooklyn-based design firm Pensa launched the Street Charge project, with 25 solar mobile charging units spread around the city.The stations work day or night, in sun or shade. During the day, monocrystalline solar panels collect the sun’s energy to recharge internal batteries. This makes possible to charge smartphones, tablets and other devices even when the sun isn't shining.The idea was born after Hurricane Sandy disaster when the city was in a blackout and AT&T powered New Yorkers with generators and pop-up cellular service. This tool demonstrates how we increasingly dependent on technology, not only in case of crisis, but also for everyday emergencies. [post_title] => Free Solar Chargers in the Streets of NY [post_excerpt] => Solar chargers for everyday emergencies. 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Berlin is kicking off its cultural season with the not-to-miss 23th installment of Transmediale. This year the digital art/culture festival focuses on how feelings are made into objects of technological design, and asks what role emotions and empathy play within digital culture.

We combed the program so you don't have to:

How to Grow and Use Your Feelers (Workshop. Wednesday from 11:00 to 14:00

Donna Harrway's writings inspired the interdisciplinary techno-feminist research group #purplenoise to immerse us in a world of “feelers” as symbols for an extended human sensorium.

Algorithmic Intimacies (Talk. Saturday from 12:00 to 13:30)

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life, yet there's a deficit in current understandings of how technologies are used within algorithmic intimacies. In this talk, fembots, virtual assistants and dating apps are discussed to reflect upon how today’s algorithmic lives are felt.

Knitting and Knotting Love (Keynote. Saturday from 18:00 to 19:30)

How do you love? And how is this love traversed through networks? In their performative lecture at transmediale 2019, Shaka McGlotten tracks a networked experience of love.

Alter Media (Screening. Saturday from 19:30 to 21:30)

From global connectedness bridging unimaginable distances to data abuse, automated opinion manipulation and unrestrained marketing strategies. This screening depicts a broad spectrum of lived experiences with the media spheres of our time.

Actress + Young Paint (live AI/AV) (Performance. Saturday from 21:30 to 22:30)

Meet the AI-based character that spends its time programming Actress’ sonic palette. Expect a life-size projection of the AI working in a virtual studio, coming together with a physical performance on stage.

Cover image: Rory Pilgrim, Software Garden, 2018. Courtesty of the artist and andriesse-eyck galerie Some rights reserved. (Performance: Friday from 20:00 to 21:00)

Transmediale 2019 takes place from 31 January to 3 February 2019 at Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Tickets.

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