56 results for “Recreation”

299 trees grow in a football stadium

Ruben Baart
September 19th 2019

Some centuries ago landscape painters taught us to appreciate the quality of an untouched landscape. Ever since we have been doing everything to recreate it. We camouflage cell phone antenna mast to look like trees, we fly thousands of miles to experience a pristine landscape — and, as of this month, we can visit a native European forest inside an Austrian football stadium.

The installation, titled For Forest: The Unending Attraction of Nature, houses 299 native Central European tree species …

Your Next Nature guide to Unseen 2018: When Records Melt

Meike Schipper
September 10th 2018

Images largely shape our experience of reality. Just consider how imagery of nature continues to rise in popularity: only a society no longer grounded in their natural landscape is able to treat such a scenery as art.

Longing for a nature long lost, we instead immersive ourselves in paintings to appreciate the quality of untouched landscapes, we simulate snowfall for skiing experience, and we keep a piece of glacier ice as a relic of a different time. These natural and …

Female Menstrual Cycle on a Computer Chip

Julie Reindl
April 27th 2017
The complicated system of a female menstruation cycle was reproduced on a computer chip for the first time.

Turning Glass Bottles into Sand

Julie Reindl
April 1st 2017
A machine lets drinkers instantly turn their empty beer bottles into sand.

Color Lessons from the Cotinga Bird

Lydia Halders
January 15th 2017
Brighter inks, without pigment: nanostructured capsules could bring about paints and electronic displays that never fade.

Copy-Paste City: from Austria to China

Monika Kozub
August 4th 2016
Hallstatt, a small UNESCO World Heritage city in central Austria, is the only village in the world entirely copied and rebuilt in China.

Re-introducing Extinct Species

Margherita Olivo
March 26th 2016
Extinct European bisons are being reintroduced in parks. But what makes a national park?

Human Cloning Now Possible in China

Daniel Fraga
January 5th 2016
Is human cloning here? Chinese scientist is ready to clone people at his ‘replication factory’.

Space Archeologist Unlocks Secrets of Ancient Civilizations

Margherita Olivo
November 14th 2015

Sarah Parcak is a pioneering "satellite archaeologist" from University of Alabama, a sort of Indiana Jones with 21st century tech. She has been awarded the 2016 TED Prize for her work applying infrared imagery from satellites to help locate ancient sites lost in time. Her revolutionary methods helped her discover ancient cities and astonishing sites around the world, but especially in Egypt, where she came across 17 unknown pyramids, more than 1000 tombs and 3100 settlements.…

Stratospheric Sky Garden with Proto Life

Alessia Andreotti
September 27th 2015
A sky garden of cacti and artificial life forms floating a hundred thousand feet above the Earth's surface.
WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [tag] => recreation [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => )[query_vars] => Array ( [tag] => recreation [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [cat] => [tag_id] => 162 [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( )[category__and] => Array ( )[post__in] => Array ( )[post__not_in] => Array ( )[post_name__in] => Array ( )[tag__in] => Array ( )[tag__not_in] => Array ( )[tag__and] => Array ( )[tag_slug__in] => Array ( [0] => recreation )[tag_slug__and] => Array ( )[post_parent__in] => Array ( )[post_parent__not_in] => Array ( )[author__in] => Array ( )[author__not_in] => Array ( )[ignore_sticky_posts] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => )[tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[field] => term_id [operator] => NOT IN [include_children] => )[1] => Array ( [taxonomy] => post_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => recreation )[field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ))[relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships )[queried_terms] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => recreation )[field] => slug ))[primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID )[meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( )[relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( )[clauses:protected] => Array ( )[has_or_relation:protected] => )[date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 162 [name] => Recreation [slug] => recreation [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 166 [taxonomy] => post_tag [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 56 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 162 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (166) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 120395 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2019-09-19 12:00:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-19 11:00:14 [post_content] =>

Some centuries ago landscape painters taught us to appreciate the quality of an untouched landscape. Ever since we have been doing everything to recreate it. We camouflage cell phone antenna mast to look like trees, we fly thousands of miles to experience a pristine landscape — and, as of this month, we can visit a native European forest inside an Austrian football stadium.

The installation, titled For Forest: The Unending Attraction of Nature, houses 299 native Central European tree species and has turned into a lush forest of birches, willows, maples and oaks and many other varieties. With the ephemeral forest, the stadium hopes to attract wildlife (including humans, although humans are not allowed to walk around inside the forest) during the seven weeks the installation is open.

The project is designed by Swiss curator Klaus Littmann as a commemorative to the environment: “[It] aims to challenge our perception of nature and question its future,” it reads on the official press release. “It seeks to become a memorial, reminding us that nature, which we so often take for granted, may someday only be found in specially designated spaces".

It’s certainly an unusual sight, but as you enjoy the following images why not ask yourself: Is a forest in a football stadium the best way to speak about climate change?

Photography: Gerard Maurer and UNIMO.

[post_title] => 299 trees grow in a football stadium [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => forest-football-stadium [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-12 10:59:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-12 09:59:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=120395 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 6 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91097 [post_author] => 1666 [post_date] => 2018-09-10 15:47:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-10 14:47:23 [post_content] =>

Images largely shape our experience of reality. Just consider how imagery of nature continues to rise in popularity: only a society no longer grounded in their natural landscape is able to treat such a scenery as art.

Longing for a nature long lost, we instead immersive ourselves in paintings to appreciate the quality of untouched landscapes, we simulate snowfall for skiing experience, and we keep a piece of glacier ice as a relic of a different time. These natural and artificial landscapes blend together in When Records Melt, an exhibition to increase awareness of global climate change dangers through various photographic interpretations.

The exhibition is the result of a joint effort between Unseen Amsterdam and Project Pressure, a charity organization dedicated to documenting the world’s vanishing glaciers. For Unseen, Project Pressure selected works from international artists that focus on raising awareness through a variety of photographic interpretations, depicting issues surrounding the global environment in a new and inspiring context, and engage a large audience to inspire behavioural change — because a picture is worth a thousand words. Here are three works you shouldn’t miss:

Glacier du Rhône by Noémie Goudal, 2016

Melting glaciers are uniquely visual evidence of the pressing, yet mainly invisible issue of climate change. The poetic resemblance between a photograph and a vanishing glacier is striking, as both could be regarded as visual traces of something once there was. This double layer of representation becomes tangible in the work of French artist Noémie Goudal.

Goudal travelled to the Glacier du Rhône in Switzerland and created an on-site installation. The work consists of a large photograph of the glacier printed on biodegradable paper that slowly blends into its surrounding. The disintegration of the physical image emphasizes the intrinsically volatile nature of both the photograph and the glacier: “It’s such a strong, solid landscape when you look at it, and with the knowledge that it is disintegrating, that sense of fragility comes back into play.”

Mount Rainier by Peter Funch, 2016

The regression of glaciers preceded the development of color photography, which means that photography has only been able to capture glaciers as an object of abatement. The work Imperfect Atlas by the Danish photographer Peter Funch plays with the notions of physical decay and regression, by using RGB-tricolour separation to create his images; a technique that came about during the Industrial Revolution. Funch explores the meaning of landscapes as touristic hotspots, and positions the photographs next to historic postcards to showcase the gap between reality and simulation of the places we long for. Hello from postcard nature!

Rhône Glacier by Simon Norfolk and Klaus Thymann, 2018

This haunting image is created by Simon Norfolk and Klaus Thymann. A small business has draped a thermal blanket over a part of the glacier to prevent it from melting and to keep their touristic grotto in place. It's old nature covered up by next nature. The glacier has become a commodity, and the result is a surreal, nearly abstract image of a landscape that once was natural. The title of the work, Shroud, explicitly refers to the inescapable future of the landscape: “There is something insane about trying to reverse the inevitable. The gesture is as forlorn and doomed as the glacier itself.”

When Records Melt is part of Unseen 2018 and runs from the 21st to the 23rd of September. Visit unseenamsterdam.com for more information.

[post_title] => Your Next Nature guide to Unseen 2018: When Records Melt [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => unseen-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 12:51:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 11:51:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91097 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72879 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-04-27 10:25:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-27 08:25:57 [post_content] => The female reproductive complex is a truly complicated system made of organs and changing hormones that can seem quite obscure at times, even to a woman herself. Recently scientists managed to reproduce the entire menstrual cycle in the laboratory for the first time ever. All on a computer chip of the size of a hand, visually not resembling anything we carry in our body.In the chip there are 3D containers mimicking the human organs and in particular the female reproductive system. As the system consists of different parts, scientists needed to take into account the cooperation of these parts, including ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, cervi and vagina. The containers replicate one organ at a time and are connected through small tubes functioning like the blood circulation system. Each of the mini organs was covered in real human or animal stemmcells referring to their human counterpart. Through the wired "blood circle" the organs then become able to exchange information using hormones, similar to the procedure in a woman's body.Through the artificial mini organs scientists created a new way to study, understand and intervene in female health. Now it is possible for them to gain more data and insights into how organs communicate and how drug treatments can be personalized to react to each individual body. The next goal for the researches is to design a male opponent in order to see how both can work simultaneously.This might be the next step in developing a whole "body on an chip", including the most precious thing we have: our brain, and its communication with the rest of our complex construction.Source: Popsci [post_title] => Female Menstrual Cycle on a Computer Chip [post_excerpt] => The complicated system of a female menstruation cycle was reproduced on a computer chip for the first time. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => female-menstrual-cycle-just-got-reproduced [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-27 10:26:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-27 08:26:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72879/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72411 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-04-01 10:06:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-01 09:06:55 [post_content] => New Zealand is famous for its old nature: mountains, beaches, rivers, lakes and a lot of national parks to be protected. Newzealanders also do love beer, but obviously not the trash that is left behind after evening drinks at the beach. For that reason the New Zealand brewery DB Breweries designed a device that immediately turn empty glass bottles into sand!Yes sand! Handy right? At the same time it recycles the bottles and counteracts the global shortage of sand. Two-thirds of beaches on the planet are lacking the natural source. You would think that there is way to much sand on our planet, as deserts are constantly growing. The problem with desert sand is that it is to small and round to be used for constructions and this is the sector that uses most of the needed resource.In the case of New Zealand, the sand obtained with the bottle-to-sand device goes to leading producers of concrete and to big construction companies around the world, to be used to build houses, roads, cycle paths and a lot more. With the supply of these construction companies, the dredging of sand from beaches should be by passed. Dredging beaches is the main reason for the sand shortage. Sand clock is ticking so lets hope the rest of the world will soon also be able to recycle their used beer bottles!Source: Mashable. Image: Inspiration Room [post_title] => Turning Glass Bottles into Sand [post_excerpt] => A machine lets drinkers instantly turn their empty beer bottles into sand. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => turning-glass-bottles-into-sand [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-01 10:07:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-01 09:07:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72411/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70548 [post_author] => 1319 [post_date] => 2017-01-15 20:25:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-15 19:25:51 [post_content] => You don't need to be a birdwatcher to appreciate the magnificent colors of the feathers of the male spangled cotinga flaunt. This bird finds its natural habitat in the canopy of the Amazonian Rainforest and has captivated the curiosity of scientists and bird fanatics for decades. Its dazzling blue body and deep red throat contain no pigment. The color effect is created by the shape of the material. This is known as structural coloration. Now researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) together with Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have found a way to imitate these biological nanostructures and potentially replace the pigments we use today.Current paints and dyes fade in intensity over time as they absorb light. Contrastingly, structural color amplifies certain wavelengths and, as a consequence, the color remains intact as long as the material does. This process happens in nature, and it is extremely difficult to reproduce, as each color relies on a very specific crystalline pattern. Peacocks and butterflies, for example, use photonic crystals or arrays of nanofibres that are precisely structured to establish the color. What makes the cotinga particularly interesting is the fact that its formal network is porous and much more random, resulting in a surface that looks like a sponge.[caption id="attachment_70549" align="aligncenter" width="650"] A microcapsule shrinks as it dries, arriving at its final color.[/caption]SEAS and KAIST created “microcapsules filled with a disordered solution of nanoparticles suspended in water”. As these capsules dry out, they shrink, reducing the distance between the particles. In turn, these alterations in structure will reflect light differently and will result in a spectrum of color for our eyes to see.Aside from generating color that is resistant to weathering caused by sunlight, this technology could hold great benefits in replacing synthetic dyes that are toxic and harmful to the environment. More applications could be found in electronic display technology. “The dream is that you could have a piece of flexible plastic that you can put graphics on in full color and read in bright sunlight” Says Professor Vinothan N. Manoharan, author of the study.Sources: Asian Scientist, SEAS Harvard Images: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, SEAS Harvard [post_title] => Color Lessons from the Cotinga Bird [post_excerpt] => Brighter inks, without pigment: nanostructured capsules could bring about paints and electronic displays that never fade. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => color-lessons-cotinga-bird [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-18 15:16:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-18 14:16:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70548/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 65243 [post_author] => 875 [post_date] => 2016-08-04 23:00:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-04 21:00:26 [post_content] => As the saying goes “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”, so Hallstatt - a small UNESCO World Heritage city in central Austria - can feel really proud. Among numerous fake Italian villas and French palaces, it is the only village in the world entirely copied and rebuilt in China. State-owned developer Minmetals constructed it in the suburbs of Huizhou, in the southern part of the country.It was meant as a luxury residential area, as the region is known for its clean air (relatively to the average amount of pollution in China) and a popular resort away from bustling metropolis nearby. The cost of a new-old villa in 2012 - after the grand opening - was between £200.000 and £500.000, higher than the original 300-year-old ones in Austria. Chinese people are neither permitted to invest abroad, nor to send money outside of the country, so the real estate market is for them one of the few possibilities on which to invest. Even if the houses were actually sold, as the property developers claimed, the place remained a ghost town for a couple of years. Recently, it became a popular touristic venue, mainly among newlyweds.Hallstatt in ChinaEven though the Austrian village was measured, photographed and redesigned carefully, the copy is not entirely true. The lake, made as a part of the village construction, is 50 times smaller than the original one. Snowy Alps landscape, which makes a wonderful background for the real Hallstatt, was impossible to recreate and dried hills not higher than few hundred feet above the see level have to do. The Chinese designers couldn’t resist to commemorate the most famous Austrian, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, so they built a replica of the Getreidegasse - a street of Salzburg where the composer was born, 70 km distance from Hallstatt.Trying to find a reason for such copy-paste urban design, one may say that it is really hard for Chinese people to travel to see the original Hallstatt. The question is, what are they really looking at?Source: Daily Mail, HKFP. Image: Reuters/Siu Chiu [post_title] => Copy-Paste City: from Austria to China [post_excerpt] => Hallstatt, a small UNESCO World Heritage city in central Austria, is the only village in the world entirely copied and rebuilt in China. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => copy-paste-city-austria-china [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-08-09 16:14:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-08-09 14:14:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65243 [menu_order] => 135 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 62316 [post_author] => 864 [post_date] => 2016-03-26 09:31:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-26 08:31:15 [post_content] => Rewilding Europe is a Dutch organization which aims to the re-introduction of long-lost species in Europe's wilderness. They are starting with the re-wilding of the European bison, an extinct species that used to dominate our countrysides, but was then hunted to extinction by 1919. Thanks to this initiative, and the support of 54 zoos, their population counts 3.000 animals today. Their objective is to re-introduce five herds of 100 bisons by 2022 and a wild population of 1.000 by 2032.They just started to include this bison in the Netherlands, more precisely in the Maashorst nature reserve and Veluwe region. They will also introduce it in Romania, where this animal represents national pride and economic restoration, because re-wilding could help growing tourism and employment. This leads to a question. What is a national park if not man-made, commercialized creations? Between the 19th and the 20th century we started to put fences around natural landscapes and call them natural parks. Something to be preserved. As Professor Richard Grusin wrote in his study Culture, Technology, and the Creation of America’s National Parks: "To establish a national park is to construct a complex technology, an organic machine. National parks are themselves hybrid technologies for the reproduction of nature".Grusin is not denying the importance of protecting beautiful landscapes from human action, avoiding to turn them into mine sites or private mega-farms for instance. He's pointing out how much man-made and controlled these parks are once established. He continues: "The aim of which is the production and reproduction of a culturally and discursively defined and formed object called «nature»". The result of the establishment of these places is that these sceneries become more man-made than natural, losing their intact innocence.We are so involved in this concept of the national park that eventually it becomes a reflection of our idea of nature. We are actively changing the evolution and stopping time for these places. We are intervening in the natural course of events, changing the real essence of the land. National parks are essentially technologies to represent nature based on the 19th century aesthetics of landscapes portrayal.That being said, Rewilding Europe's project is valid and well-funded, especially in these days, although not easy to establish. This animal is almost unknown to the population, therefore not a lot of parks are willing to take it in. Additionally the bison is also lacking genetic diversity and for this reason less immune to disease, lowering their chances of surviving into the wild.Source: NewScientistCulture, Technology, and the Creation of America’s National ParksImage: Rewilding Europe [post_title] => Re-introducing Extinct Species [post_excerpt] => Extinct European bisons are being reintroduced in parks. But what makes a national park? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => re-introducing-extinct-species-thoughts-national-parks [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-03-30 19:15:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-03-30 18:15:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=62316 [menu_order] => 314 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 59241 [post_author] => 859 [post_date] => 2016-01-05 11:37:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-05 10:37:50 [post_content] => Human Cloning is one of those issues where technology is racing well ahead of contemporary morals and ethical frameworks. Xu Xiaochun, the chief executive behind the world's biggest cloning factory - Boyalife Group - has stated that at this moment, the technology to clone humans is already available, and that they are refraining from using it for fear of public reaction.The giant cloning facility is set to open within the next seven months, and they aim to have a yearly output of one million cloned cows per year. Not only that, they are also already looking to clone thoroughbred racehorses as well as police and pet dogs specialized in sniffing and searching. Some people are even willing to pay to bring a deceased pet back to life. But, more notable, is the research that Boyalife is conducting with its South Korean partner Sooam and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. They are trying to improve the capacity for cloning primates, to create better test animals for disease research. And guess who's a primate too? That's right, we are!Xu Xiaochun stated: "The technology is already there. If this is allowed, I don't think there are other companies better than Boyalife that make better technology". So, maybe, the biological premise that restrains each individual to having half of its genetic material come from a mother and the other half from a father may cease being the only option. A third choice may arise, where the child is one hundred percent either its father or its mother.Even though we may have many, culturally justified moral problems with the issue of cloning, we can be sure of one thing. With time, they will disappear. Boyalife knows that, and they are simply waiting for that moment. In the same way a computer would have looked like demon magic to one of our paleolithic ancestors, cloning seems so strange and far away to us. But in a future maybe not too far away, it will not - it will be progress. O brave new world, that has such people in 't! Source: RT [post_title] => Human Cloning Now Possible in China [post_excerpt] => Is human cloning here? Chinese scientist is ready to clone people at his ‘replication factory’. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => human-cloning-now-possible-china [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-08 11:08:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-08 10:08:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=59241 [menu_order] => 403 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 58621 [post_author] => 864 [post_date] => 2015-11-14 09:31:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-14 08:31:26 [post_content] => Sarah Parcak is a pioneering "satellite archaeologist" from University of Alabama, a sort of Indiana Jones with 21st century tech. She has been awarded the 2016 TED Prize for her work applying infrared imagery from satellites to help locate ancient sites lost in time. Her revolutionary methods helped her discover ancient cities and astonishing sites around the world, but especially in Egypt, where she came across 17 unknown pyramids, more than 1000 tombs and 3100 settlements.This was the result of her satellite mapping of North-Africa, but she won't stop at this, her future work will include Middle-East, which is under the spot in the last months.The TED annual prize is given to a person whose project warrants funding for a large-scale, high-impact project. Her work has resulted to be very useful and effective against looting of ancient sites. According to the New York Times, this is a serious problem, mostly in Egypt where, only last week, the government prevented a plan to smuggle 1124 sacked antiquities. The preservation of ancient monuments is a hot topic nowadays, especially after ISIS's destruction of major sites in Syria and Iraq.de3d8aa4bfe6c55dba2d3a5e60101d6f9ffde7cb_800x600Stolen antiquities have always been profitable goods, but these activities now seem to be connected to organized crime. "Is it funding terrorism?" Sarah Parcak said in a statement. "The answer is yes, but we don't know the scale. [...] The last four and half years have been horrific for archaeology. I've spent a lot of time, as have many of my colleagues, looking at the destruction, this Prize is not about me. It's about our field. It's about the thousands of men and women around the world, particularly in the Middle East, who are defending and protecting sites." Here you can see her TED talk from 2012, where she displays her methods and some of her results.Source: The New York Times. Image: University of Alabama at Birmingham [post_title] => Space Archeologist Unlocks Secrets of Ancient Civilizations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => satellite-archaeologist-sarah-parcak-wins-2016-ted-prize [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-11-14 09:31:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-14 08:31:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=58621 [menu_order] => 454 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 57086 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2015-09-27 12:17:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-27 10:17:22 [post_content] => A sky garden of cacti and artificial life forms floating a hundred thousand feet above the Earth's surface. Rachel Armstrong, Experimental Architecture professor and Next Nature Network ambassador, created the first stratospheric sky garden and platform for the cultivation of proto life.For this project, named Hanging Gardens of Medusa, Rachel Armstrong - in collaboration with Nebula Sciences - has been inspired by the short story Meeting with Medusa by sci-fi writer Arthur C. Clarke. The novel, set in Jupiter's atmosphere, poses questions about building infrastructures that allow humans to live outside of their home planet for extended periods of time.Armstrong' s stratospheric plants consist of two gardens sustained by artificial soil: the Falcon is the higher tier and contains biological organisms and the Medusa is the lower tier and proposes an environment for alternative future life forms that involve self-assembling chemistries.On the 15th of August the first flight has been tested. The gardens traveled by helium balloon into the atmosphere, where they try to hit conditions similar to a Martian environment: extreme temperature, pressure and different bands of UV radiation. Then, they took a second flight on the 29th August to determine and challenge the ability of different kinds of life forms to survive in hostile environments, both in outer space and in the harsh conditions on Earth. The various cacti were able to withstand the extreme conditions of the high altitude at 85,000ft, including a vigorous jet stream, while the artificial life forms with their super 'soft' and distributed self-organising programme were completely destroyed by the process.The concept of the Hanging Gardens of Medusa aims to promote further thought and conversation on the development of strategies to increase human capacity to survive in extreme environments, as well as in new spaces and worlds. Is it time to prepare ourselves for the unfavorable conditions on Earth and the hostile terrains of space?mainSource: Design Curial [post_title] => Stratospheric Sky Garden with Proto Life [post_excerpt] => A sky garden of cacti and artificial life forms floating a hundred thousand feet above the Earth's surface. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => stratospheric-sky-garden-with-proto-life [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-09-28 19:22:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-09-28 17:22:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=57086 [menu_order] => 533 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 120395 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2019-09-19 12:00:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-19 11:00:14 [post_content] =>

Some centuries ago landscape painters taught us to appreciate the quality of an untouched landscape. Ever since we have been doing everything to recreate it. We camouflage cell phone antenna mast to look like trees, we fly thousands of miles to experience a pristine landscape — and, as of this month, we can visit a native European forest inside an Austrian football stadium.

The installation, titled For Forest: The Unending Attraction of Nature, houses 299 native Central European tree species and has turned into a lush forest of birches, willows, maples and oaks and many other varieties. With the ephemeral forest, the stadium hopes to attract wildlife (including humans, although humans are not allowed to walk around inside the forest) during the seven weeks the installation is open.

The project is designed by Swiss curator Klaus Littmann as a commemorative to the environment: “[It] aims to challenge our perception of nature and question its future,” it reads on the official press release. “It seeks to become a memorial, reminding us that nature, which we so often take for granted, may someday only be found in specially designated spaces".

It’s certainly an unusual sight, but as you enjoy the following images why not ask yourself: Is a forest in a football stadium the best way to speak about climate change?

Photography: Gerard Maurer and UNIMO.

[post_title] => 299 trees grow in a football stadium [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => forest-football-stadium [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-12 10:59:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-12 09:59:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=120395 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 6 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 55 [max_num_pages] => 6 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0fa8b393ac716bc9f5b0884f1d7b5d54 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
load more