21 results for “Remediation”

Mark Zuckerberg Discovers ‘Books’

Van Mensvoort
January 5th 2015
Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today.

The Mood Ring of the 21th Century

NextNature.net
December 5th 2014
The Moodmetric ring measures the autonomous nervous system signals that can be used to understand emotional reactions and improve quality of life.

3000 Years Old 8-Bit Music Instrument

Alessia Andreotti
March 2nd 2014
The more iconic video game audio track played with an ancient woodwind. The resulting sound is pure 1980s nostalgia.

Peculiar Transportations

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
March 1st 2014

Last friday, these curious next natural transportations happened around our office in Amsterdam. All within the timeframe of a few hours. The surrealists where right. Have a nice weekend.…

A New Old Way to Share Pictures

Alessia Andreotti
February 10th 2014
The tiny Instagram projector.

All This Technology Makes Us Anti-Social

Van Mensvoort
January 22nd 2014
Peculiar image of the week.

Innovative Nostalgia

Van Mensvoort
January 1st 2014
We humans simply feel more comfortable with technological change when it comes in a familiar form that refers to an existing and accepted object, habit, value, tradition or intuition.

Sticky Notes Are The “New” USB Drives

Alessia Andreotti
December 17th 2013
The next generation of data portability.

Technostalgia for the Cassette Tape

Alessia Andreotti
July 19th 2013
Remember the 80s? This coffee table does.

Walter Benjamin on Film and the Senses

René Rieger
August 28th 2012

During the late 1930’s the philosopher Walter Benjamin wrote its widely influential essay ‘The work of Art in the Age of Its Technical Reproducibility’. While describing a general shift in the arts and their perception and warning about the possible exploitation for political purposes his work examines carefully the medium, especially photography and film, and its sensual aspects.[1] He attributes a tactile and palpable quality to film that elevates the medium and stresses its meaning for the human collective.

Benjamin …

WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [tag] => remediation [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => )[query_vars] => Array ( [tag] => remediation [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [cat] => [tag_id] => 277 [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( )[category__and] => Array ( )[post__in] => Array ( )[post__not_in] => Array ( )[post_name__in] => Array ( )[tag__in] => Array ( )[tag__not_in] => Array ( )[tag__and] => Array ( )[tag_slug__in] => Array ( [0] => remediation )[tag_slug__and] => Array ( )[post_parent__in] => Array ( )[post_parent__not_in] => Array ( )[author__in] => Array ( )[author__not_in] => Array ( )[ignore_sticky_posts] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => )[tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[field] => term_id [operator] => NOT IN [include_children] => )[1] => Array ( [taxonomy] => post_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => remediation )[field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ))[relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships )[queried_terms] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => remediation )[field] => slug ))[primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID )[meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( )[relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( )[clauses:protected] => Array ( )[has_or_relation:protected] => )[date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 277 [name] => Remediation [slug] => remediation [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 281 [taxonomy] => post_tag [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 21 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 277 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (281) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 42303 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2015-01-05 17:25:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-05 16:25:46 [post_content] => The Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg made a New Year’s resolution to read a book every other week, and last week he invited his 30 million Facebook followers to join him in what could become the world’s largest book club.“I’m excited for my reading challenge. I’ve found reading books very intellectually fulfilling,” Zuckerberg said in a post. “Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today.”Hooray for Mark! And his book club is so influential that the paperback version of the first book Zuck chose to read for the group,”The End of Power” has now sold out on Amazon. Naturally we have a special book recommendation for Mark. [post_title] => Mark Zuckerberg Discovers 'Books' [post_excerpt] => Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => marc-zuckerberg-discovers-books [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-01-05 21:49:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-01-05 20:49:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=42303 [menu_order] => 807 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 42067 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2014-12-05 15:54:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-12-05 14:54:06 [post_content] => Have you ever worn a mood ring? Rings that were thought to be able to indicate ones mood through color. Whether they were reliable or not, people have been wearing them since their introduction in the mid ’70s and are still wearing them today. Currently, a Finnish design company called Moodmetric is trying to give these trinkets a modern face lift by making them digital.Originally mood rings used thermo-sensitive liquid crystals to indicate a mood based on temperature. However, this was hardly reliable and that is why the version made by Moodmetric uses a bio-metric sensor to create this reliability. This sensor measures the autonomous nervous system signals that can be used to understand your emotional reactions. The ring gathers this data, interprets it and logs them in order to make it available on your smartphone though an app.The device can register several moods or emotions and announces them to you. The intention for this is to make you aware of yourself and hereby get to know yourself better. The App that is linked to the ring also offers meditation and other programs to help with this and to create calmness in your body and mind.The idea of a “modern” mood ring is nice. However, should it be connected to a smartphone? I actually liked the beauty in abstractness of the original version. What do you think?Moodmetric_2014_bg_white_PRESS-550x400This article was originally published on Next Nature Lab [post_title] => The Mood Ring of the 21th Century [post_excerpt] => The Moodmetric ring measures the autonomous nervous system signals that can be used to understand emotional reactions and improve quality of life. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-mood-ring-of-the-21th-century [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-16 14:49:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-16 13:49:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=42067 [menu_order] => 829 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38425 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2014-03-02 15:30:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-02 14:30:07 [post_content] => [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qM9hH3suOpo#t=15[/youtube]It could be a coincidence, but the Super Mario Brothers theme sounds like the sheng tone, an old Chinese instrument dated back to 1100 B.C. The more iconic video game audio track played with an ancient woodwind. The resulting sound is pure 1980s nostalgia, it resembles to 8-bit synthesized electronic music produced by the sound chips of vintage computers, video game consoles, and arcade machines. It makes wonder if Nintendo actually used the sheng in their sound effect conceptualization.Source: Gizmondo Related post: Technostalgia [post_title] => 3000 Years Old 8-Bit Music Instrument [post_excerpt] => The more iconic video game audio track played with an ancient woodwind. The resulting sound is pure 1980s nostalgia. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3000-years-old-8-bit-music-instrument [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-16 14:50:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-16 13:50:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38425 [menu_order] => 1087 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38419 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2014-03-01 11:10:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-01 10:10:59 [post_content] => curious_transport_530Last friday, these curious next natural transportations happened around our office in Amsterdam. All within the timeframe of a few hours. The surrealists where right. Have a nice weekend. [post_title] => Peculiar Transportations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => peculiar-transportations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-03-01 11:10:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-03-01 10:10:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38419 [menu_order] => 1088 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 38075 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2014-02-10 10:30:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-10 09:30:58 [post_content] => There was a certain charm in projectors: gather the family, focus the transparencies by twisting the lens barrel and sit back to enjoy the slideshow. Now that we take pictures with the smartphone most of the time, this ritual doesn’t exist anymore.Instead of having those digital pictures crowding the outer space, you can now view them thanks to Projecteo, a mini Instagram projector for when you feel nostalgic. The device is made up of an LED light and three watch-size batteries to make sharing photos an analog snap. From the Projecteo website, users pick nine Instagram images to develop onto a piece of 35mm film, to fit inside the projector's corresponding mini reel. Innovative nostalgia, indeed! [post_title] => A New Old Way to Share Pictures [post_excerpt] => The tiny Instagram projector. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-new-old-way-to-share-a-picture [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-08-17 12:11:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-17 10:11:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=38075 [menu_order] => 1110 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37929 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2014-01-22 13:04:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-22 12:04:17 [post_content] => Peculiar image of the week. Via Transcendent Man. [post_title] => All This Technology Makes Us Anti-Social [post_excerpt] => Peculiar image of the week. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => all-this-technology-makes-us-anti-social [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-01-22 13:04:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-01-22 12:04:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37929 [menu_order] => 1130 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37346 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2014-01-01 00:13:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-31 23:13:09 [post_content] => A battle is underway between designers and engineers; at stake is the design of our technological future. It rages subtly like a moorland fire. Koert van Mensvoort adds fuel to the flames, but also offers a solution. The impact of new technology on our lives is hard to overestimate. These days, design begins at the level of bits, atoms, neurons and genes. 3D printing has become common property, it’s the new bamboo. Augmented reality drapes a layer of information over our existence. Social media are reprogramming the fabric of our society. Your bathroom scale communicates with your smart phone. And the first lab-grown hamburger has been served. Researchers are working on a 3D organ tissue printer to tackle the shortage of donors.The ‘made’ and the ‘born’ are fusing.Nano-, bio-, and information technology generate a new kind of aesthetic and provide new construction kits for our living environment. Meanwhile the vanguard of cultural design is boiling Brussels sprouts.[pullquote]3D printing has become common property, it’s the new bamboo.[/pullquote]In recent years the (so-called progressive and forward-thinking) cultural design vanguard has shown its most conservative side. Furniture made of scrap wood, hand-spun blankets, forgotten vegetables on a menu board written in chalk. The crisis is ongoing and the designers take us back to grandmother’s time when everything was, after all, so much better. Far from the angry world of change. Back in the hand-knotted cocoon of tradition and nostalgia.[caption id="attachment_83307" align="alignnone" width="640"] Agricultural Farming Robot by Tony E. Grift[/caption]Meanwhile the technological revolution marches merrily on wards. In our everyday living environment, technology has now become so ubiquitous, complex and autonomous that we are starting to experience it as a nature in itself.At railway stations the public transport pass chip-scanning poles are shooting up like mushrooms in the most illogical places. The food in the supermarket has become medicinal. Toddlers think that a magazine is a broken tablet PC.Instead of giving shape to these developments, the cultural design vanguard has stuck its head in the sand and retreated to a nostalgic comfort zone – which unfortunately is only accessible to the upper middle class.[pullquote]Technology has become so ubiquitous that we are starting to experience it as a nature in itself[/pullquote]Designers appeared to have liberated themselves from the age-old preconception of them as merely insubstantial beautifiers, called in right at the end of a process – long after the marketing department had determined the strategy – to provide the end product with an attractive veneer of design.Henceforth design would also relate to processes, services and even rituals. Everything in our constructed environment is subject to design and thus the scope of design had become virtually infinite.Unfortunately the lack of interest or even aversion to new technology indicates that design has reverted to its old reflexes. Designers continue to be the cheerful boys and girls who don’t bake the cake themselves, but only provide it with the icing. More and more frequently that icing tastes of parsnip, but it remains icing.The design of the technological domain is being left to the engineers.This is a huge mistake.Why? Because that domain is precisely where the designers are sorely needed. While engineers are above all very good at making things that function flawlessly, design is a profession in which sensory perception, intuitive capacity and socio-cultural awareness are basic qualities. And precisely these qualities are of paramount importance in the design of our technological future.[pullquote]While technology is supposed to serve to us, it does sometimes feel as if we serve technology[/pullquote]Believe me, I should know. Although I myself studied computer science and art, I've been teaching for about ten years at the Eindhoven University of Technology. Now, I can tell you that people at a Technical University really know a lot about technology. There are buildings in which they make nanostructures for solar panels, buildings where heart valves are grown from tissue, buildings where inscription algorithms are developed. All of which is wonderful.But let’s be honest, design at a Technical University will always remain an unwanted child. Physicists, chemists and mathematicians have an unjust and persistent tendency to look down on the lack of exactness in the design field.Instead of explaining that good design is so complex that it cannot just be summed up in a simple formula, and that the more exact professions might learn something from this as their own material becomes more complex, the designers on campus – who, incidentally, prefer to call themselves design researchers – display compensatory behavior by talking about their profession in very exact and analytical terms. That translates into a great many analyses and user tests, which are subsequently published in unfathomable articles.Is that useful? Perhaps. Is it design? No.[caption id="attachment_83308" align="alignnone" width="960"] WIFI Dowsing Rod, by Mike Thompson[/caption]A thriving design practice at a Technical University remains awkward. The analytical qualities are exceptional, but we are barely able to simply make good designs. And we are totally incapable of actually designing.Virtually everything designed by the students on design courses at the Dutch Technical Universities looks like it came from a Star Wars film. You know, like those 3D printed objects with too many LED lights and exaggerated superfluous forms that mostly appear to scream: ‘Look! I've been designed!’, and in which an inadequately developed sense of form is shouted down by naive enthusiasm.Now I don’t want to blame the students, it’s because of the teachers: sensitivity to form is nowhere to be found among the teaching staff. Myself included, because I remember all too well from my time at art college that my purely aesthetic design skills are mediocre at best.But then in the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king. And so, it is possible that our technological environment will be designed by a bunch of would-be designers or technical engineers with more good intentions than talent for design. And the rest of the design world just looks on and puts another pan of sprouts on to boil.[pullquote]Should we slam on the brakes and return to grandmother’s time, or can we embrace technology in the hope that it will solve all our problems?[/pullquote]A moorland fire is raging, an underground battle between designers and engineers, at stake: our future. Should we slam on the brakes and return to grandmother’s time, or can we embrace technology in the hope that it will solve all our problems?Here after I shall propose a ceasefire, but let us first attempt to understand why designers don’t just happily participate in the technologization. You see, good reasons for this are conceivable. Every person on the planet, not only in the western world, has to deal with radical technological changes throughout her or his life. Sometimes these are delightful and liberating, but also often confusing, uncomfortable and alienating.For many of us the pace of change is in fact too rapid. If you nod off for just a moment, it feels as though you've been lying in a coma for months. Then suddenly you can no longer buy a roll of film anywhere. Train tickets are nowhere to be found either. So you stand there bleeping with your chip card, which you invariably forget to check out.While technology is supposed to serve to us, it does sometimes feel as if we serve technology. And that is also partly the case. Technology seems to have become an autonomous force that wants to evolve, if possible to the greater glory of humanity, but if necessary, and just as easily, at the cost of our human potency.[embed]https://vimeo.com/171061144[/embed]

Digital Analog Clock by Maarten Baas

So designers are actually quite right to not unquestioningly way to the technological might of the Googles, Microsofts and Media Markts. There is an urgent need for a reflective counter movement and designers could play a leading role therein. Unfortunately the cultural design vanguard demonstrates little appetite for taking up arms and joining the fray.The nostalgic designers are like an eighteen-year-old girl who has closed her Facebook account and hung up a tablecloth at school with the title ‘Facedoek’, onto which she’s pasted all her photos. An extremely sympathetic act of resistance. Hip too. Art perhaps. But at the end of the day it remains a marginal gesture.[pullquote] Technology seems to have become an autonomous force that wants to evolve, at the cost of our human potency [/pullquote]An obvious example of a sector in which the battle between designers and engineers is occurring is in food, or food design. Though we hardly realize it, absolutely every aspect of our food is designed. Not just the packaging, but the color of the salmon and the sound of the frankfurter are also the result of human decisions.Whereas the culturally conscious design vanguard concentrates on biological and, if possible, locally produced ‘real’ food, it is the engineers who, by order of the Unilevers and Albert Heijns of this world, design the medicinal milk, microwave meals and genetically modified tasteless tomatoes. While the vanguard of design serves the upper middle class with incredibly delicious but also expensive forgotten vegetables, the rest of the population eats microwave meals.[caption id="attachment_83309" align="alignnone" width="1280"] Using Silkworms to 3D a Pavilion, MIT media lab[/caption]Don’t get me wrong, the nostalgic attachment to tradition, familiarity and reliability is not only understandable, but also justified. The only problem is that the expression of that longing is all too often purely conservative and uninformed. That is incompatible with a group of people who regard themselves as progressive, forward-thinking or even avant-garde. There seems to be a certain amount of schizophrenia among the professional group: on the one hand designers are keen to be associated with a fresh, open view of the future, but simultaneously they quench their thirst mainly with a naive nostalgia for the past.That has got to stop. Grandmother’s time was not better, dear designer. Emerge from your melancholic cocoon and help us to advance.Now, enough criticism. Let me try to be constructive and attempt to come up with a solution. I wish to propose that the inconsistency between the desired progressiveness and nostalgia should not be removed, but actually made into a force, or more than that, a design method.We’ll christen this method: innovative nostalgia.Though you might think that nostalgia is conservative by definition, I believe it is also possible to be progressively nostalgic. How then? By not simply deploying the nostalgic longing reactively, but indeed proactively: nostalgia as a strategy by which to make the strangeness of new technology understandable.[pullquote]Innovative nostalgia combines an understanding of the future with proven qualities of the past[/pullquote]Innovative nostalgia combines an understanding of the future with proven qualities of the past. Designers could very consciously seek ways to translate existing values, traditions and intuitions into a contemporary form. It is not the intention hereto straight out copy the historical element, but to transform it into a modern-day incarnation.Because the innovative nostalgia design approach was only introduced a few sentences ago, it is not yet littered with examples. Still, we do see that the method, whether consciously or not, is already being applied.An obvious example is the walnut bookcase in the iBooks app on your iPad, which has made digital books accessible for a large public by referring to the trusty bookcase. Other examples are the analogue recreation of a digital clock by Maarten Baas, the Wifi Dowsing Rod by Mike Thompson, which helps people locate Wifi networks with the aid of a digital dowsing rod, the Dune installation by Daan Roosegaarde, who transforms a stroll through the reeds into a hi-tech experience, or the celebrated Bone Chair by Joris Laarman, who subtly reminds us that a chair is actually an extension of the human skeleton. A beautiful pavilion was recently created at the MIT in Boston, ‘3D printed by silkworms’.Looking back, the architecture of Gaudi could be regarded as innovative nostalgic before the term existed, because he understood like no other architect that people are genetically accustomed to living in caves, and he put that into his architecture.And there are also possibilities for innovative nostalgia looking to the future. Imagine earthenware from the 3D printer. Hand-knitted cultured meat. An electric vintage car. Genetically revived extinct vegetables. Perfume that can be swallowed which mixes with your own body odour. Carrier pigeons that bring round memory cards with sensitive information. Organic farming with no pesticides or seasonal labour, but with agricultural robots that sow, tend and harvest the plants – naturally powered by solar energy and entirely CO2-neutral.[caption id="attachment_83310" align="alignnone" width="800"] Dune by Studio Roosegaarde[/caption]Though it is still an art to find the right balance and avoid the pitfall of kitsch, innovative nostalgia can be employed to provide new phenomena with a historical context. We humans simply feel more comfortable with technological change when it comes in a familiar form that refers to an existing and accepted object, habit, value, tradition or intuition.The idea of nostalgia can be interpreted broadly. It might refer to a phenomenon from your childhood, grandmother’s time, or even to the ancient history of humanity –for example, imagine the ‘nostalgic’ grilling of meat over a fire, which can be interpreted more as a genetic memory than a reminiscence of childhood.By designing with innovative nostalgia, designers can not only position themselves in a high-speed technological world, but also actively contribute to making that world more humane, familiar, enjoyable and richer. Instead of fighting a rearguard action, the present and past are linked together. Grandmother’s time is still relevant as a source of inspiration, but it does need to be transformed. The future has already started. So come on, let’s get that nostalgia going forward now!This essay was originally published in Dutch Design Yearbook 2013. Top image: Casa Milá by Gaudi. [post_title] => Innovative Nostalgia [post_excerpt] => We humans simply feel more comfortable with technological change when it comes in a familiar form that refers to an existing and accepted object, habit, value, tradition or intuition. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => innovative-nostalgia-design-the-future-by-referring-to-the-past [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-11-28 15:14:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-28 14:14:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37346 [menu_order] => 1147 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37530 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-12-17 11:01:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-17 10:01:03 [post_content] => The future of USB keys? Sticky notes 2.0! Traditional Post-it has been updated by an Indian duo of designers, Aditi Singh and Parag Anand. DataSTICKIES could be the next generation of data portability. Made of graphene to mimic the look of little adhesive note tabs, they can store a great quantity of digital information, just like a USB key.To read the contents and transfer files, the notes need to be stuck on a Optical Data Transfer Surface that is attached to the front of surfaces, for instance a computer monitor or a television. The reusable conductive adhesive helps the connection.The user can write on DataSTICKIES' top surface and attach them to the physical objects they are associated with. It's an interesting idea for the possibilities it opens. As its creators point out: “DataSTICKIES provide an opportunity to bridge the virtual world and the physical world. Digital data becomes easier to associate with, as it can be integrated with the physical objects it relates to. For instance, data related to a particular subject in a book can be stuck on the relevant page”. [post_title] => Sticky Notes Are The "New" USB Drives [post_excerpt] => The next generation of data portability. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sticky-notes-are-the-new-usb-drives [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-08-24 22:04:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-24 20:04:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37530 [menu_order] => 1162 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 35209 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-07-19 11:00:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-19 09:00:30 [post_content] => Seattle designer Jeff Skierka might suffer from technostalgia, since he was inspired by the good old days to reinvent the obsolete audio tape in the shape of a coffee table. Handmade from reclaimed maple wood on a 12:1 scale, the table is reversible, just like a real cassette tape.This peculiar piece of furniture is a good example of technostalgia, wherein we idolize old-fashioned technologies in response to what feels like an overwhelming rate of technological change. In technostalgia, we recreate our past and give it new meaning in the present. [post_title] => Technostalgia for the Cassette Tape [post_excerpt] => Remember the 80s? This coffee table does. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technostalgia-for-the-cassette-tape [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-16 14:52:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-16 13:52:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=35209 [menu_order] => 1337 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23533 [post_author] => 329 [post_date] => 2012-08-28 09:03:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-08-28 07:03:41 [post_content] => During the late 1930’s the philosopher Walter Benjamin wrote its widely influential essay ‘The work of Art in the Age of Its Technical Reproducibility’. While describing a general shift in the arts and their perception and warning about the possible exploitation for political purposes his work examines carefully the medium, especially photography and film, and its sensual aspects.[1] He attributes a tactile and palpable quality to film that elevates the medium and stresses its meaning for the human collective.Benjamin formulates a historical task of film, ‘which is to gain control over technology and its effects.’[2] For him, film is an exercise for the senses to adapt ourselves. It were the ‘successive changes of scene and focus’ that were ‘a true training ground’ of modern perception.[3] Film thus corresponds to the changes that each passerby experiences in big-city traffic.[4] On the one hand the ‘filmic stimuli transcend the category of purely optical impressions’, on the other hand they stay safely or visually enframed in the screen.[5]These theories build upon the works of the dadaists and that of art historian Alois Riegl. The works of the dadaists are described for example as sensual ‘projectiles’ that jolted the viewer.[6] Some 40 years earlier the science called the haptics formulated itself which researches the connection of the human senses to the outer world. Nowadays it finds its application in a multitude of disciplines like the social sciences, robotics, virtual interfaces and design.[7] The parallelism between the scientific progression in exploring the senses and Walter Benjamins writings about the media becomes obvious.Eventually Benjamin itself widens the perspective by opposing technology as a second nature to contemporary society. Humans are no longer mastering this second nature which they now confront and ‘they are just as compelled to undertake an apprenticeship as they were once when confronted with first nature.’ In Benjamins point of view ‘art once again places itself at the service of such apprenticeship - and in particular film.’[9]Benjamin was thus a forerunner of the idea of Next Nature who centered its attention on the human relationship with technology already 80 years ago. Moreover he attributes an important role the human senses and how the human being experiences its environment in his media analytics. An uplifting implication by Benjamin is that humans always invent new technologies to cope with the ones that they developed previously.1 Wilke, Tobias. 2010. “Tacti(ca)lity Reclaimed: Benjamin’s Medium, the Avant-Garde, and the Politics of the Senses” Grey Room 39 (Spring), 39-51 2 Wilke, “Tacti(ca)lity” 50. 3 Benjamin, Walter. 1939. “Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit (derde versie),” in Gesammelte Schriften, I, 2, ed. Rolf Tiedemann & Hermann Schweppenhäuser. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1991, 503. 4 Benjamin, “Das Kunstwerk“ in Gesammelte Scriften, I 503. 5 Wilke, “Tacti(ca)lity” 49. 6 Benjamin, Walter. 1936. “Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit (tweede versie),” in Gesammelte Schriften, VII, 1, ed. Rolf Tiedemann & Hermann Schweppenhäuser. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1991, 379. 7 Grunwald, Martin, ed. 2008. Human Haptic Perception: Basics and Applications. Basel, Boston: Birkhäuser, ix. 8 Benjamin, “Das Kunstwerk“ in Gesammelte Scriften, I 444-445. [post_title] => Walter Benjamin on Film and the Senses [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => walter-benjamin-on-film-and-the-senses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-08-26 23:19:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-08-26 21:19:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=23533 [menu_order] => 1786 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 42303 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2015-01-05 17:25:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-05 16:25:46 [post_content] => The Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg made a New Year’s resolution to read a book every other week, and last week he invited his 30 million Facebook followers to join him in what could become the world’s largest book club.“I’m excited for my reading challenge. I’ve found reading books very intellectually fulfilling,” Zuckerberg said in a post. “Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today.”Hooray for Mark! And his book club is so influential that the paperback version of the first book Zuck chose to read for the group,”The End of Power” has now sold out on Amazon. Naturally we have a special book recommendation for Mark. [post_title] => Mark Zuckerberg Discovers 'Books' [post_excerpt] => Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => marc-zuckerberg-discovers-books [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-01-05 21:49:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-01-05 20:49:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=42303 [menu_order] => 807 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 21 [max_num_pages] => 3 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 23a443fdd3d0d96ac40ee776622373cf [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
load more