215 results for “Society of Simulations”

How Pokemon are affected by climate change

Ruben Baart
November 20th 2019

You know climate change is real when dead coral Pokemon start to wash up on (virtual) beaches. Behold, Cursola, world’s first dead coral Pokemon.

On the origins of Cursola

While Pokemon has become a cultural phenomenon since its release in 1996, the media franchise maintains its relevance today.

Let's take a brief look at Cursola’s backstory—it more or less aligns with what climate change is doing to coral on Earth.

"Found in the warm shallow waters of southern seas, Corsola …

Instagram will remove filters promoting cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns

Cara Curtis
October 29th 2019

If your Instagram feed is anything like mine, it’s littered with timelapses of injected lip fillers, Kardashian-promoted beauty products, and Story filters that “enhance” your face. The subliminal pressure to be “perfect” is no longer subliminal, and it’s putting more more of a strain on young users more than ever. 

This is why Instagram is planning to remove all AR filters that depict or are associated with cosmetic surgery. Over the past few months, filters like “Plastica” — an effect …

How AI is reshaping electronic music

Linda Valenta
September 12th 2019

The idea that AI can compose electronic music may sound a little off to people. It raises essential questions about creativity as a product exclusive to humans: can an AI be creative? Can it be musical? Can it compete with human-made melodies? Does it need to?

More and more, AI has set foot in the realm of creative industries. From an AI writing the next GoT book to IBM’s Watson creating a trailer for a non-exisent sci-fi thriller. And that’s …

‘Play e-dead’ means to avoid being visibly active online

Teyosh
May 22nd 2019

Playing e-dead means to avoid being visibly active online because of not having answered to someone’s message or comment. This is a part of a social media code of conduct; if you haven’t answered to someone’s message or comment, it can only be justified by eleminating the use of social media.

However, it may be offensive if you don’t respond to someone’s message while you continue your daily online activities (which shows that you have plenty of time).

Some people …

Three ways virtual reality is revolutionizing teaching

John Pickavance
May 14th 2019

You’ve probably heard how Virtual Reality (VR) is going to change everything: the way we work, the way we live, the way we play. Still, for every truly transformative technology, there are landfills of hoverboards, 3D televisions, Segways, and MiniDiscs – the technological scrap it turns out we didn’t need.

It’s reasonable to approach VR with a degree of scepticism, but allow me to explain three ways in which VR can transform the way we learn, and why we, as …

‘(Un)postable’ is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media

Teyosh
April 26th 2019

When perceiving the world around us as a potential Instagram post, some thoughts, stories and situations can easily be packed into a tweet or a photo, while others are harder to mould into one. Remember when people were excited about how they would retell their story to friends when they meet? Now they have a chance to share it on the go.

To that end, perceiving life in a 'postable' manner can easily become addictive, as goes for the motivation …

Digital detoxes are a solution looking for a problem

David A Ellis
April 19th 2019

With New Year’s resolutions in full swing, many people may have chosen to cut down on their tech use – or even give it up altogether. The growing popularity of such “digital detoxes” is encouraged by a slew of negative findings about the effects of technology use, alongside claims that such action can help reduce stress and help people become more “present” and compassionate.

But frequent use of technology and social media isn’t a problem in itself. Despite reported claims, there’s currently little scientific evidence …

Artificial ceramic bones for a natural meat experience

Ruben Baart
March 22nd 2019

The world is developing, climate change is happening and it's time for us to do something. Now.

One strategy would be to simply stop eating meat — or at least reduce the amount of our consumption. “Why?”, you may think. Well here are some numbers: If you do not eat meat for a week as an adult, you save 130 liters of water, 76 kilometres of driving a car and 770 grams of animal meat.

Sure, some people may find …

Call for movies: Which movie deserves a spot in the sequal to the Next Nature movie top 10?

NextNature.net
February 7th 2019

Sequels and prequels appear in our cinemas every day but somehow we haven’t had a follow-up to our infamous Next Nature movie top 10 that fully deserves the “sequel treatment”.

Allow us to refresh your memory:

1. Quest for Fire / La Guerre du Feu (1981)
2. Being There (1979)
3. Koyaansiqatsi (1983)
4. Blade Runner (1984)
5. American Beauty (1999)
6.The Matrix (1999)
7. Grizzly Man (2005)
8. Avatar (2009)
9. The Terminal (2004)
10. Idiocracy (2006)

Thus our …

‘Clickvalue’ is the subjective value of someone’s like, retweet or share

Teyosh
February 5th 2019

Although all likes, shares, and retweets come from the same act of clicking, not all of them carry the same value. If you are in love, the most valuable like will be the one from your crush. If you are seeking professional support, the most valuable retweet will come from your renowned colleague.

Unlike the currency of offline life, where every dollar is the same, no matter who it is coming from, the currency of online life consists of clicking …

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You know climate change is real when dead coral Pokemon start to wash up on (virtual) beaches. Behold, Cursola, world’s first dead coral Pokemon.

On the origins of Cursola

While Pokemon has become a cultural phenomenon since its release in 1996, the media franchise maintains its relevance today.

Let's take a brief look at Cursola’s backstory—it more or less aligns with what climate change is doing to coral on Earth.

"Found in the warm shallow waters of southern seas, Corsola requires clean water to live. If its habitat is dirty, the growths on its back become discolored and degenerate. However, when it is healthy, its growths regularly shed and grow back."

According to the Pokedex, Cursola came about after “sudden climate change wiped out this ancient kind of Corsola”.

The original version of the Pokemon Corsola

Corsola *was* originally a pink-and-blue coral-like creature that was first included in the ‘Gold' and ‘Silver’ versions of the popular video game from 1999.

Just last week the Pokemon Company introduced Pokemon ‘Sword’ and ‘Shield’, and just two days after its official release an avid player uploaded a battling guide video indicating “DON’T Evolve Galarian Corsola In Pokemon Sword and Shield!”

It appeared that Corsola had turned into a ghost.

The new version of the Pokemon Corsola and its final form: Cursola

New media, new habits

In the latest stage of Pokemon evolution, Corsola took on a new skin. Once a water/rock dual type (properties for Pokemon and their moves), Corsola is now a ghost type Pokemon, reminding us of the massive bleaching event that threatens the world’s coral reefs.

Apparently, Pokemon nowadays is the perfect medium to introduce kids to the environmental crisis. As Pokemon Go already had thaught us how virtual computer worlds are becoming increasingly ‘real’ and blended with our physical world; Pokemon Sword and Shield will teach us about rising ocean temperatures and the importance of living with coral and algae in a lively symbiotic bond.

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If your Instagram feed is anything like mine, it’s littered with timelapses of injected lip fillers, Kardashian-promoted beauty products, and Story filters that “enhance” your face. The subliminal pressure to be “perfect” is no longer subliminal, and it’s putting more more of a strain on young users more than ever

This is why Instagram is planning to remove all AR filters that depict or are associated with cosmetic surgery. Over the past few months, filters like “Plastica” — an effect that gives you extreme plastic surgery — have become increasingly popular, even viral. But with their rapid popularity comes growing concerns over the impact they may have on young people’s body image.

Instagram-filter-cosmetic-surgery

Back in August, Facebook announced its (previously invite-only) tool to create face filters — Spark AR Creators – was open to the public, allowing anyone to create and publish effects for use in Instagram Stories. With this came a flood of more problematic filters, such as “Fix Me” an effect which illustrates the pen-markings of pre-surgery, including a nose job, eyebrow lift, and cheek fillers.

Although Spark AR didn’t design the filter, it did approve the filter to be used by its one billion users on Instagram Stories. A post published by Spark AR Creators stated that it wants its filters “to be a positive experience and are re-evaluating its existing policies as they relate to well-being.” While its policies are being reviewed and updated, Facebook is removing existing filters like “Fix Me,” and postponing the approval of any similar new effects.

This news comes shortly after Facebook and Instagram announced they will tighten their policy on posts related to cosmetic surgery and weight loss products by hiding related posts from users known to be aged under 18. This update includes the removal of any content that makes a “miraculous” claim about a diet or weight-loss product linked to a commercial offer, such as a discount code or affiliate link.

It’s reassuring to see Instagram and Facebook take responsibility for what they’ve been hosting, but it remains to be seen how proactively they will respond to issues of mental and physical health in the future.

This article is republished from The Next Web under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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The idea that AI can compose electronic music may sound a little off to people. It raises essential questions about creativity as a product exclusive to humans: can an AI be creative? Can it be musical? Can it compete with human-made melodies? Does it need to?

More and more, AI has set foot in the realm of creative industries. From an AI writing the next GoT book to IBM’s Watson creating a trailer for a non-exisent sci-fi thriller. And that’s not where it ends: the music industry also got involved when that same Watson was used by award winning producers to create country rap, not to mention a Eurovision song created with machine learning.

Electronic music, too, is affected by the algorithmic technologies that revolutionize the way humans relate to the arts. As a discipline that has technology at its very core, electronic music is bound to cross paths with the ways of AI. From DJing to producing and from contriving DJ names to directing music videos, algorithmic agency is growing stronger each day.

The subsequent question is how humans pertain to these technologies and how the arts and AI can be treated as a symbiosis, rather than a dystopian binary. Put differently, how can we embrace AI as an instrument we can work together with, rather than an autonomous entity overruling human creativity?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MKAf6YX_7M

Music has always been technological

There has always been a link between music and technology, as essentially it revolves around counting and measuring the rhythm, as much as it relies on instruments.

Clapping their hands, our early ancestors used their body as an instrument to create rhythmic music. As our predecessors found out that they could smack sticks or stones to enhance the beat without hurting their hands, drums were invented.

Fast-forward to the 20th century, elaborate drum kits emerged at the intersection of African-American brass bands and western instruments. The technology of the bass paddle made it possible to use both hands and feet to incite sound, hence evolving the drum kit as we know it now.

The instrument was further technologized when companies like Korg and Roland started producing drum machines on a massive scale. The genres that emerged from these instruments diverged, but essentially, both the drum kit and drum machine serve as a technology to produce the rhythms and sounds that we know as music.

Are algorithms are the next DJs?

In the same line, DJing has undergone changes when the vinyl decks were complemented by USB-driven CDJs. Though the technologies changed, the art of DJing remains present – just in different ways.

In this day and age, AI is the upcoming technology broadening the horizon of (electronic) music. On a day-to-day basis, algorithms are already silently ruling our music taste through auto-playlists like the ones developed by YouTube, Spotify and Apple Genius. In a way, algorithms are already our next DJs.

But not only are these algorithms able to curate music to our likenings; they are also able to flawlessly mix our favorite tracks together. Recently, a Spotify playlist was born that tests an automixing feature with the help of AI. The Drum And Bass Fix playlist seamlessly beatmatches two tracks when shuffle is switched on.

Not into drum and bass? Then try curating your own beat-matched set or mashup by using Rave DJ. This online application allows you to upload a YouTube or Spotify playlist with the use of algorithms. It then creates a smooth mix of even the most obscure track combinations.

Naturally, tech giant Google also engaged with algorithmic advances within the electronic music industry by developing an AI synth named NSynth. This open source synthesizer uses Google’s network to reproduce the qualities of sounds and instruments, which feeds its algorithms. Though based on neural networks, it actually comes as a hardware product with a touchscreen pad.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsZc4Q_eDk4

Will AI outmix humanity?

These tools may seem futuristic, but there are plenty of artists already utilizing AI to produce music. At this year’s Transmediale, UK DJ and producer Actress even granted his AI offspring complete artistic agency by giving it a stage name: Young Paint. Together, they enacted a live audiovisual performance that was mostly based on real-time improvisation, but they also captured some collaborative ventures on a mini-album via his new label Werk__Ltd.

According to electronic musician Olle Holmberg, it is just a matter of time before we will be following AI DJ’s and producers on social media, after attending our favorite algorithmically driven gigs – which is basically already happening with the advent of virtual influencers.

Based on the semantic traits that can be found in Hardwax’s database of DJ names, Holmberg recently published a list of DJ names generated by an AI. Though a DJ name might seem trivial, it does show that AI is capable of mimicking and further developing our club experience based on our current ideas of what clubbing should be like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_4UqpUmMkg

Team human

There is an uncanny objection to these kind of technological advances, assuming they would violate our authentic ‘humanness’, when in fact it is in our very human nature to be technological. Speaking, writing, reading counting, singing – these are all cultural technologies; so are DJing and producing.

The cycle that drove us from drum kits to drum machines is the same evolutionary force driving humans to interact with AI in creating new musical works of art. Within this framework, AI basically is our next nature’s cultural technology.

Scholar and electronic music composer Holly Herndon, who built an AI recording system to help with her latest album, addresses the pervasive narrative in which technology is dehumanizing and instead proposes to ‘run towards’ technology, but on her own human terms.

This brings us to the crucial debate revolving around AI: we often forget how algorithms are technologies developed by humans. If algorithms become dehumanizing vehicles, they can only be so because the human system made them that way. 

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Playing e-dead means to avoid being visibly active online because of not having answered to someone’s message or comment. This is a part of a social media code of conduct; if you haven’t answered to someone’s message or comment, it can only be justified by eleminating the use of social media.

However, it may be offensive if you don’t respond to someone’s message while you continue your daily online activities (which shows that you have plenty of time).

Some people therefore choose to avoid all social networks until they reply — which is the only proper way not to get busted for playing e-dead — but for most of us, it's easier to be inactive only on the social network that the message was delivered to.

Note: this is the obvious sign of playing e-dead.

Constant availability and being connected comes at its price; we are not always in the mood to socialize and meet the expectations of online social norms.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

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You’ve probably heard how Virtual Reality (VR) is going to change everything: the way we work, the way we live, the way we play. Still, for every truly transformative technology, there are landfills of hoverboards, 3D televisions, Segways, and MiniDiscs – the technological scrap it turns out we didn’t need.

It’s reasonable to approach VR with a degree of scepticism, but allow me to explain three ways in which VR can transform the way we learn, and why we, as psychologists, are so excited about it.

1. Exploring the unexplorable

VR has great potential as a classroom aid. We know learning is more effective when learners are actively engaged. Practical lessons that encourage interaction are more successful than those where content is passively absorbed. However, certain topics are difficult to ground in meaningful tasks that learners relate to.

From the enormity of the universe to the cellular complexity of living organisms, our egocentric senses haven’t evolved to comprehend anything beyond the scale of ourselves. Through stereoscopic trickery and motion tracking, VR grounds counter-factual worlds in the plausible. For the first time, learners can step inside these environments and explore for themselves.

Researchers are currently developing Virtual Plant Cell, the first interactive VR experience that’s designed for use in the classroom. Learners explore the alien landscape of – well – a plant cell. Wading through swampy cytosol, ducking and weaving around cytoskeletal fibres, and uncovering the secrets of the plant’s subcellular treasures: emerald green chloroplasts, where photosynthesis takes place, curious blobs of mitochondria, or a glimpse of DNA through a sychedelic nuclear pore.

The inner workings of the cell are grounded, allowing students to actively engage with the lesson’s content through meaningful tasks. They may work in pairs to give each other tours, or create a photosynthetic production line. Using intuitive gestures, students grab carbon dioxide and water molecules from around the cell, feeding them to chloroplasts to produce glucose and oxygen. With all the ingredients for active learning, the Virtual Plant Cell should be a particularly effective teaching aid. Indeed, preliminary data suggests it may improve learning over traditional methods by 30%.

2. VR for everyone and everything

It’s not just the learning of “what” something is that VR can assist with, but also the learning of “how” to do something. In psychology, we make the distinction between declarative (what) and procedural (how) knowledge precisely because the latter is formed by doing and can be applied directly to a given task. Put simply, the best way to learn a skill is by doing it.

Every learner’s goal is to cultivate a large enough range of experience that individual elements can be drawn upon to meet the demands of novel problems. To this end, a great deal has been invested into training simulators for high-risk skills such as flying and surgery. But there are many lower-risk skills which would benefit from simulation, there’s just been little reason to justify investment. That is, until now.

Advancements in mobile technology have led to high-definition VR sets for the price of a mid-range TV. Without the financial barrier, consumer-grade VR opens the door to improve skills training in settings where the real thing isn’t readily available.

One such example would be the Virtual Landscapes programme we’ve developed at the University of Leeds. A vital part of any geologist’s training is to learn how to conduct geological surveys. Armed with a compass, GPS and a map, geologists must navigate unfamiliar terrain to make observations, ensuring they make the most of their time. VR simulation can provide this in real time, with all the tools they’d expect to have out in the field.

The advantages are twofold. Student absences from field trips become less of a hindrance with access to an accurate simulation. The challenges of surveying a mountainous region differ from those in a tropical rainforest. It may be easier to see where you’re going, but your choice of path will be more constrained. VR can present these different biomes without students having to visit all corners of the Earth. The learner’s experience is expanded, and they’re better equipped to tackle novel problems in the field.

3. Wearing (a VR headset) is caring

VR may also hold the key to driving positive behavioural changes. One way we know we can achieve this is by eliciting empathy. VR uniquely allows people to experience alternative perspectives, even being dubbed the ultimate “empathy machine”. It’s a lofty claim, but early applications have shown promise.

A recent Stanford study showed that participants who experienced becoming homeless in VR displayed more positive behaviour towards homeless people – in this case, through signing a petition demanding solutions to the housing crisis – than those who engaged with the same materials on a traditional desktop computer. This effect persisted long after the study ended. Perhaps by experiencing firsthand the challenges faced by vulnerable groups, we can share a common understanding.

The power of VR to elicit empathy might be used to tackle an even wider range of social issues. We’ve been running VR outreach projects in schools to improve awareness around climate change. Through VR, young people have witnessed the melting of the icecaps, swam in the Great Barrier Reef to see the effects of receding coral on the ecosystem and rubbed shoulders with great primates whose habitats are being cleared by deforestation. Using VR, we hope to cultivate environmentally responsible behaviour before attitudes and habits become more fixed.

So there you have it. By bringing previously inaccessible experiences into the classroom, VR may accelerate the learning of abstract concepts, augment the acquisition of skills, and perhaps even be a force for social change. For now, the technological scrap heap can wait.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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When perceiving the world around us as a potential Instagram post, some thoughts, stories and situations can easily be packed into a tweet or a photo, while others are harder to mould into one. Remember when people were excited about how they would retell their story to friends when they meet? Now they have a chance to share it on the go.

To that end, perceiving life in a 'postable' manner can easily become addictive, as goes for the motivation behind the moment of going somewhere or doing something; it engages us to interact with our gadgets—rather than our immediate environment.

(Un)postable is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

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With New Year’s resolutions in full swing, many people may have chosen to cut down on their tech use – or even give it up altogether. The growing popularity of such “digital detoxes” is encouraged by a slew of negative findings about the effects of technology use, alongside claims that such action can help reduce stress and help people become more “present” and compassionate.

But frequent use of technology and social media isn’t a problem in itself. Despite reported claims, there’s currently little scientific evidence that digital detoxes have any benefits. In fact, giving up your devices completely could have its own unintended negative consequences.

Cause or effect

One of the reasons that digital detoxes seem good for us is the misconception that technology is inherently harmful. There are numerous studies that link excessive technology use with poorer sleep, increased depressive symptoms, and higher levels of anxiety.

But while studies ask participants questions about how much they use technology and how depressed or anxious they are, they are unable to explain the direction of any effect. Essentially, we cannot tell if they use social media because they are depressed, or they are depressed because they use social media. And, of course, many other factors might explain why a person feels depressed or anxious.

We cannot tell if they use social media because they are depressed, or they are depressed because they use social media.

Most studies also rely on self-reported estimates of technology use, which often don’t reflect reality. Studies that rely on people self-reporting may get inaccurate information. Interestingly, when time in front of a screen is measured automatically by an application or device, depression and anxiety severity aren’t associated with total smartphone usage.

Research often tends to treat all technology use as equal. This assumption overlooks the fact that we have a different experience with each kind of technology we use. For example, mindlessly scrolling Instagram is very different to chatting on WhatsApp, or using a fitness tracker.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH), the UK body representing doctors who specialise in children, recently arguedthat screen time is not “toxic” to health and that the evidence for harm is overstated. But negative findings continue to have a greater influence on public opinion as they appear more frequently in the popular press. This can sometimes lead to a vicious cycle where research responds directly to “hoax” media claims. The results then generate even more alarming headlines.

Giving up your digital existence

Meanwhile, there’s little evidence that digital detoxes actually have any benefit. The majority of what exists is based on anecdotes rather than scientific studies. Some arguments might seem sensible, such as that giving up technology may encourage people to be more physically active. But again, no research has demonstrated that this is actually true.

Giving up technology also means giving up the good things about it. For example, smartphones and social media help people communicate and socialise, which is known to increase happiness. So it’s not surprising that some studies have found complete withdrawal from social media can have adverse consequences such as lower satisfactionboredom, feelings of social pressure, and fear.

Smartphones and social media help people communicate and socialise, which is known to increase happiness.

While giving up a digital existence for a short time may let people reconnect with other aspects of their lives, this is often a temporary state that is impossible to maintain. Most people will simply return to prior habits that have become an essential part of everyday life.

Age-old concerns

People have always been concerned about almost every mass-adopted technology invented, and social media and smartphones are no different. But the idea that screen-based technologies are harming society continues to be a source of considerable debate surrounded by questionable evidence and media hype. As more research is completed, it’s important that findings are presented carefully to prevent further misinterpretation and fear-mongering.

When it comes to digital detoxes, there is unlikely to be anything seriously wrong with stepping away from technology for the majority of people. But the notion that they’re a “good idea”, or that they have any lasting effects, is yet to be supported by science. In fact, seeing as there’s little evidence to suggest that technology is inherently bad, it might be that digital detoxes have no problem to solve in the first place.

There’s little evidence to suggest that technology is inherently bad

While the evidence we do have is patchy from decades of bad practice, the truth is slowly emerging with improved methods. This is starting to suggest that technology use is not harmful in itself. As politicians consider the impact, they should be mindful of these developments.

This article is written by David A. Ellis, 50th Anniversary Lecturer, Psychology, Lancaster University and Brittany I. Davidson, Doctoral Researcher, University of Bath. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.
Image: Andrew Brookes

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The world is developing, climate change is happening and it's time for us to do something. Now.

One strategy would be to simply stop eating meat — or at least reduce the amount of our consumption. “Why?”, you may think. Well here are some numbers: If you do not eat meat for a week as an adult, you save 130 liters of water, 76 kilometres of driving a car and 770 grams of animal meat.

Sure, some people may find it to be hard to stop eating meat, yet there are innovative solutions on its way that may help you overcome the inconvenience of not eating meat. Like eating in vitro meat!

Grown in bioreactors from animal cells, in vitro meat could be a sustainable and humane alternative to raising a whole animal from birth to slaughter. The first lab-grown hamburger is already here, but in vitro meat technology could also bring us entirely new culinary experiences.

A future scenario

One of these experiences would be to eat from an artificial ceramic bone — for a natural meat experience. And while it may sound farfetched for now, there's one designer living ahead of us in envisioning such a future.

Meet Yossi Roth, industrial designer based in Jerusalem, Israel. In his latest project, Future Carnivore, he imagined a scenario in which in-vitro meat has become the norm.

As the slaughtering of animals is out of the equation, it's no longer possible to nibble the remaining bits from the bone. And that's where his project steps in.

These bone-shaped ceramics emphasise on the gap "between the brutality of slaughtering an animal for our food, as on the sterile process of growing meat inside a lab." Roth's eating utensils remind us what savage hunters we once were — or perhaps, still are.

We recently caught up with Roth to discuss the future of meat, how to market such a product, and why industrial designers may be the next butchers.

Tell us a bit about the project, Future Carnivore.

For Future Carnivore I imagined a scenario in which in-vitro meat has become the main source of protein. A future where animal meat is no longer needed. How will everyday events like family meals, cooking or buying meat look like? Today when we go to the butcher and look at the selection of meat we see a lot of dead animals cuts, bleeding red, inner organs, fat and bones… Sounds disgusting, doesn't it? But somehow we've gotten OK with it. No longer do we hesitate to buy the most beautiful dead piece of animal; it has become natural to us to do so.

The objects I created are artificial ceramic bones. They function as tools for eating and cooking meat. The bones are a reminder of the animal we used to kill in the 'past'. They are here to remind us what savage hunters we were, and how we shouldn’t stray from the path of finding more viable solutions to consume protein — while maintaining a ecological balance on our planet. The bone acts as heat vessel to disperse heat through the meat in the cooking process. In addition it adds weight and visual appearance.

What were the first reactions to the project?

In-vitro meat still seems like sci-fi to some people, even though it's literally here. People who saw the project, told me they gained a better understand towards the advent of in-vitro meat. My intention was to confront the viewers with the brutal way we are consuming meat today, in which I succeeded: When people were holding and using the artificial bone, this idea of holding and eating from a real bone suddenly seemed violent, brutal and even absurd.

Why did you choose for a 'bone' as your medium (as opposed to a different not-animal-related tool)?

Consider this, our hunter-gatherer ancestors used every part of the animal; for food, clothes and tools. With that, the animal bones were used for tool making, hunting, utensils and jewellery. I’ve chosen to use the bone to emphasise the major contrast between the time periods, between the brutal act of killing an animal, and the sterile process of growing meat in a lab.

The bone as such, plays an important role in our experience with meat. I mean, we use it for cooking, we hold the bone while eating, and it gives weight, flavor, heat etc. I used the bone as a gesture and reminder to better remind ourselves where it (and we) came from. The bone says a lot about us, our culture and history.

You could compare it to the shutter sound on our phone; the shutter does not need to make this sound no more, but it does help us understand its function.

Do you eat meat yourself?

I experimented with vegetarianism for couple of years in the past, but only after a few years I returned to eating meat. Today I eat meat scarcely, mainly due to environmental awareness and the problem of meat farms. Yet I have the means in my region to find a cheap and healthy substitute. I believe that many people around the world share this feeling, but experience difficulties to substitute meat (which mainly has to do with its unique flavor and texture).

While researching in-vitro meat, I got very impressed by the advantages of this technology. This led me to think, as a designer, what fascinates me the most is the role of design in this radical revolution. From there I started to wonder how this innovation could affect user experience in the future — which led to the Future Carnivore project.

Do you think that people are ready to stir up an appetite for eating in-vitro meat?

I think we will have to go through a long process until we get used to (the idea of) in-vitro meat — but it's a process that already has begun. Our habits are hard to change, even harder when it comes to our food, and meat in particular. When I asked people whether they’ll try it or not, the majority told me that they would. I guess we are going to see in-vitro meat in the near future, whether we like it or not.

Any thoughts on how we could introduce eating in-vitro to the world at large?

In 2008 the MOMA hosted an exhibition titled “Design and the elastic mind”. The 'elastic' refers to the way we’re accepting and adapting to new ideas and technology. Designers hold to unique opportunity in dealing with and creating this elasticity in our brains. They have the ability to transform science and technology into objects that we can comprehend and use.

I, as a designer, don't know how to make in-vitro meat more tastier, but I can certainly think about the look and feel of the technology. It's not only a matter of taste, the “UX” (user experience) of the meat needs to be dealt with. The experience we have while eating a steak has multiple sensory and emotional factors that add to the overall experience - visual, tactile, smell, weight etc. If we can deeply understand this experience, the introduction can be successfully made.

Are industrial designers the new butchers?

Lol. It is pretty hard to find a job as a designer, so perhaps exploring the field of 'meat design' would be an interesting opportunity...

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Sequels and prequels appear in our cinemas every day but somehow we haven’t had a follow-up to our infamous Next Nature movie top 10 that fully deserves the “sequel treatment”.

Allow us to refresh your memory:

1. Quest for Fire / La Guerre du Feu (1981)
2. Being There (1979)
3. Koyaansiqatsi (1983)
4. Blade Runner (1984)
5. American Beauty (1999)
6.The Matrix (1999)
7. Grizzly Man (2005)
8. Avatar (2009)
9. The Terminal (2004)
10. Idiocracy (2006)

Thus our carefully crafted, not updated yet timeless, always debatable and incomplete list of the ten next nature movies for you to watch.

Now, our top 10 is getting a sequal series, many years on from its completion after bingewatching (ahem, working) for the sake of research.

Is there a movie (2010-present) of which you think deserves a spot in the Next Nature movie top 10, part two? Share your suggestions in the comments below ?

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Although all likes, shares, and retweets come from the same act of clicking, not all of them carry the same value. If you are in love, the most valuable like will be the one from your crush. If you are seeking professional support, the most valuable retweet will come from your renowned colleague.

Unlike the currency of offline life, where every dollar is the same, no matter who it is coming from, the currency of online life consists of clicking like, retweet and share where not every click has the same value.

Clickvalue depends on who the person that reacted to our post is, how popular online they are at the moment, what our personal relationship to them is, how often they like our posts and other people’s posts (if they have a like generator, their click basically has no value).

In general, most valuable likes are from the people who are popular and who we are trying to impress. Least valuable likes are from our moms ( love you, mom <3 ).

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

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You know climate change is real when dead coral Pokemon start to wash up on (virtual) beaches. Behold, Cursola, world’s first dead coral Pokemon.

On the origins of Cursola

While Pokemon has become a cultural phenomenon since its release in 1996, the media franchise maintains its relevance today.

Let's take a brief look at Cursola’s backstory—it more or less aligns with what climate change is doing to coral on Earth.

"Found in the warm shallow waters of southern seas, Corsola requires clean water to live. If its habitat is dirty, the growths on its back become discolored and degenerate. However, when it is healthy, its growths regularly shed and grow back."

According to the Pokedex, Cursola came about after “sudden climate change wiped out this ancient kind of Corsola”.

The original version of the Pokemon Corsola

Corsola *was* originally a pink-and-blue coral-like creature that was first included in the ‘Gold' and ‘Silver’ versions of the popular video game from 1999.

Just last week the Pokemon Company introduced Pokemon ‘Sword’ and ‘Shield’, and just two days after its official release an avid player uploaded a battling guide video indicating “DON’T Evolve Galarian Corsola In Pokemon Sword and Shield!”

It appeared that Corsola had turned into a ghost.

The new version of the Pokemon Corsola and its final form: Cursola

New media, new habits

In the latest stage of Pokemon evolution, Corsola took on a new skin. Once a water/rock dual type (properties for Pokemon and their moves), Corsola is now a ghost type Pokemon, reminding us of the massive bleaching event that threatens the world’s coral reefs.

Apparently, Pokemon nowadays is the perfect medium to introduce kids to the environmental crisis. As Pokemon Go already had thaught us how virtual computer worlds are becoming increasingly ‘real’ and blended with our physical world; Pokemon Sword and Shield will teach us about rising ocean temperatures and the importance of living with coral and algae in a lively symbiotic bond.

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