280 results for “Supermarket”

A vegan meat revolution is coming to global fast food chains

Malte Rodl
July 2nd 2019

A few years ago, convincing meat-free “meat” was nothing more than a distant dream for most consumers. Meat substitutes in supermarkets lacked variety and quality. Plant-based burgers were few and far between in major fast food outlets – and meaty they were not.

But realistic alternatives to environmentally damaging meat are now big business – and global fast food chains are finally starting to take notice.

Burger King has announced that after a hugely successful trial, it will roll out …

Supermarkets Are Our New Savannah, Especially During Natural Disasters

Megan Ray Nichols
September 11th 2017
Before a natural disaster hordes of people crowd in supermarkets and fight over the last supplies. It mirrors the savannah with cliques and groups trying to get the available food, water or shelter.

Animal Free Cow Milk

Elle Zhan Wei
July 17th 2017
A San Francisco-based start up discovered a way to "brew" milk that has zero hormones, antibiotics, steroid or lactose inside, and a longer shelf-life.

Transformative Appetite: Shape-Shifting Pasta

NextNature.net
June 8th 2017
MIT Media Lab developed pasta programmed on a computer.

Tattooing Fruits and Veggies with Lasers

Ruben Baart
May 13th 2017
Eco-friendly lasers might soon replace stick-on labels on fruits and veggies.

Insect Ramen: the New Food Trend

Julie Reindl
May 9th 2017
Tokyo restaurant offers sustainable new dish - ramen noodles topped with crunchy insects and people love it

Tiny Food Made in a Tiny Kitchen

Ruben Baart
April 17th 2017
A small introduction to tiny cooking.

Tap Your Milk from a Cow Around the Corner

Ruben Baart
March 26th 2017
Turning cows into walking vending machines for milk.

FarmVille Turns into Real-Life Agriculture

Julie Reindl
March 16th 2017
A Japanese Start up brings Farmville back into real life by letting players grow physical food.

3D Print Your Pizza in Six Minutes

Ruben Baart
March 11th 2017
Meet the commercial 3D pizza printer that takes your order via a smartphone app.
WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [tag] => supermarket [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => )[query_vars] => Array ( [tag] => supermarket [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [cat] => [tag_id] => 109 [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( )[category__and] => Array ( )[post__in] => Array ( )[post__not_in] => Array ( )[post_name__in] => Array ( )[tag__in] => Array ( )[tag__not_in] => Array ( )[tag__and] => Array ( )[tag_slug__in] => Array ( [0] => supermarket )[tag_slug__and] => Array ( )[post_parent__in] => Array ( )[post_parent__not_in] => Array ( )[author__in] => Array ( )[author__not_in] => Array ( )[ignore_sticky_posts] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => )[tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[field] => term_id [operator] => NOT IN [include_children] => )[1] => Array ( [taxonomy] => post_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => supermarket )[field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ))[relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships )[queried_terms] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => supermarket )[field] => slug ))[primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID )[meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( )[relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( )[clauses:protected] => Array ( )[has_or_relation:protected] => )[date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 109 [name] => Supermarket [slug] => supermarket [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 112 [taxonomy] => post_tag [description] => The height of next nature, and the best evidence we are living in the future. Modern supermarkets know no season or scarcity, with products from every corner of the globe. Junk foods, frozen dinners, and even normal-looking tomatoes are all marvels of careful engineering for optimum marketability. [parent] => 0 [count] => 280 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 109 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (112) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 113755 [post_author] => 2151 [post_date] => 2019-07-02 10:39:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-02 09:39:08 [post_content] =>

A few years ago, convincing meat-free “meat” was nothing more than a distant dream for most consumers. Meat substitutes in supermarkets lacked variety and quality. Plant-based burgers were few and far between in major fast food outlets – and meaty they were not.

But realistic alternatives to environmentally damaging meat are now big business – and global fast food chains are finally starting to take notice.

Burger King has announced that after a hugely successful trial, it will roll out its partnership with plant-based meat company Impossible Foods across the US. McDonalds recently introduced the similarly meaty Big Vegan TS in its outlets in Germany, one of its five largest international markets.

Now finally able to produce meat-free imitations that are for many indistinguishable from their beefy counterparts, the rapidly growing industry appears set to make serious waves in the once impregnable bastions of cheap meat. In so doing, it could kickstart a rapid decline in meat’s contribution to the climate crisis – driven not just by a global minority of vegans and vegetarians, but by millions of meat-eaters too.

Joining the meatless burger bandwagon

Thanks to rising interest in food technology from Silicon Valley’s start-up scene, such indistinguishable vegan meat came on the menu a little over five years ago. Helped by huge investments, sophisticated marketing, and a friendly regulatory environment, US companies leaped to the forefront of vegan meat innovation. Products such as the Impossible Burger and the Beyond Burger soon entered into many smaller US restaurants and fast food outlets, before Burger King made it widely available across the country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng4C2HMH664

In contrast, for a long time, tighter food regulations in Europe stifled meatless meat innovation. Thanks to the European Union’s precautionary principle, companies face much more stringent checks to show that new ingredients and foods aren’t harmful before they can go on sale. Quorn, a low-cost meat substitute that is now a household name, took almost ten years to be approved as a legitimate foodstuff, because its use of fungi was unprecedented.

These tight regulations also stipulate that genetically modified ingredients have to be labelled, which may explain why the widely heralded Impossible Burger – which uses genetically modified yeast to produce the blood-like plant protein that tastes so much like beef – has not yet landed in European countries.

Combined with differences in language, food culture and investment climate across European states, innovative start-ups looking to bring high-quality meat analogues took longer to thrive in Europe.

But while the US may have had a head-start in high-quality vegan meat innovation, it may surprise you to know that plant-based alternatives are much more popular in parts of Europe. While some European states such as France, Portugal and Switzerland are yet to warm to fake meat, the average Briton (750g) or Swede (725g) consumed nearly twice as many meat alternatives in 2018 as in the US (350g), where vegan meats are have typically been more realistic and thus higher-priced than in much of Europe.

With the market growing at times by orders of magnitude as traditional meat-eaters switched on to plant-based products, it was only a matter of time before major European companies started cottoning on to the potential of high-quality meat imitations.

In 2017, McDonald’s was quick to roll out a vegan burger, the McVegan, at its restaurants in Finland and Sweden. But it was not designed to closely resemble meat, and was marketed primarily at vegans.

In the UK, where more than half of British people have either already reduced or are considering reducing their meat consumption, Greggs decided to blaze the trail. Having only last year considered vegan sausage rolls “too difficult” a proposition, they are now returning record profits thanks to an offering so popular that the bakery has struggled to keep up with demand.

In traditionally meaty Germany, meat alternatives were practically non-existent ten years ago. But Germans now aren’t far off the USA in fake meat consumption, thanks in part to prominent processed meat brands entering the market. It’s no coincidence that McDonald’s in Germany has since decided to partner with Nestlé, a new major player in the meatless meat game, to offer a vegan burger there.

The market for plant-based meat is rapidly growing across Europe and the USA. Malte Roedl/Euromonitor International, Author provided

If news of out-of-reach vegan burgers is giving you food envy, there is no need to worry. Different cultures, tastes, prices and administrative hurdles mean that developments will not happen everywhere at the same time. But in the next couple of years, expect to see a lot more plant-based meat coming to fast food chains near you.

Realistic chicken imitations have thus far proved difficult to master, but KFC plans to trial a vegan version of its chicken fillet burger from June 17. Meanwhile Burger King is already exploring how best to bring its vegan burger to Europe.

And, given the whopping 30% increase in sales brought by the Impossible Whopper, McDonald’s and Nestlé are already considering expanding their partnership beyond Germany.

Crucially, these fast-food vegan meats are not just aimed at vegans and vegetarians, but meat-lovers too, who still make up the vast majority of the country populations across the world. The Impossible Whopper, for example, is marketed not as a planet-saving treat, but a healthier way to enjoy the same meaty taste their customers are used to.

Some vegans baulk at the idea of replicating the taste of animal flesh – but the bigger picture is that such products will play a major role in realising projections that the majority of “meat” will not come from dead animals by 2040.

Taste and health still far outweigh concern for the environment and animal welfare as factors that determine whether people are willing to purchase plant-based meat. By tapping into these, vegan meat can massively reduce the hefty emissions burden and animal suffering caused by animal agriculture.

Bring on the vegan meat revolution, I say.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

[post_title] => A vegan meat revolution is coming to global fast food chains [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => vegan-meat-revolution-fast-food [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-02 13:44:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-02 12:44:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=113755 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77218 [post_author] => 872 [post_date] => 2017-09-11 09:26:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-11 07:26:10 [post_content] => News stations and websites show what happens before a big storm hits: supermarkets run out of water, bread and other staples. Hordes of people crowd in and fight over the last supplies. It mirrors the savannah with cliques and groups trying to get the available food, water or shelter. Stores don't handle natural disasters any better than individuals.

Stores don’t know how to prepare

Grocery stores, especially large chains, are ingrained in a typical delivery system. Different trucks and deliveries come on certain days. But what if they're going to need extra? Most of the time it's inconvenient or even impossible to get an additional delivery of something you know the store is going to need if there's a hurricane on the way. There's a limited amount of goods and a lot more people that are going to want them.While emergency plans would make things a lot easier, how many do you think actually implement them? The employees are scrambling just as much as the patrons, making things even more chaotic.[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="4076"] Image: Daniel Case (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons[/caption]

Keep a pantry stocked

You'll most likely see stores get cleaned out before a hurricane or a big snowstorm. These are events that meteorologists can track and give people warning before they're going to hit. Things like tornadoes or tsunamis are sudden incidents that don't give people time to buy a bunch of stuff to prepare.This is why it’s always best to keep a disaster pantry at the ready. If it's a storm without warning, you won't have time to go to the store to prepare. Even if you do get a warning, that means you're facing the thousands of other people that want to stock up too. If you keep a pantry stocked, that means you won't have to fight off the crowds at the grocery store to buy out what you want and you won't have to worry if a quick storm hits.One size doesn't fit all here. Take the size of your family and how much they typically eat into account before building up a pantry. You can stock slowly, picking up extra items each time you go to the store instead of all at once. Water is one of the most crucial things. Also, focus on nonperishables and canned/packaged foods that will last a while - even past expiration dates. Canned veggies and fruits, rice, peanut butter, dried milk, beans and tuna are all good options.You don't want to have to venture into the savannah of the grocery store if you don't have to. Be smart and make sure that you're ready before a disaster strikes. You'll be able to breathe a sigh of relief while watching videos of everyone fighting over that last jug of water. [post_title] => Supermarkets Are Our New Savannah, Especially During Natural Disasters [post_excerpt] => Before a natural disaster hordes of people crowd in supermarkets and fight over the last supplies. It mirrors the savannah with cliques and groups trying to get the available food, water or shelter. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => natural-disasters-supermarkets-savannah [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-14 09:25:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-14 07:25:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77218/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75703 [post_author] => 1324 [post_date] => 2017-07-17 10:00:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-17 08:00:06 [post_content] => After lab-grown meat, dairy products are the next big area we want to reinvent. Perfect Day is animal free cow milk, made to be more nutritious, safe and sustainable than factory-farmed dairy. And it tastes just like real milk.Perfect Day is a San Francisco-based food research start-up founded in 2014 by two cheese-lovers, who instead of giving up dairy due to the problematic industry, they decided to create the animal free dairy products, believing there must be a better way. They assembled a team of chefs, nutritionists, scientists, designers to realize their idea. They discovered a way to "brew" milk, similar to the process of brewing beer.The same texture and taste of milk is achieved by using the age-old fermentation methods, with real milk proteins, lactose-free sugar, healthy plant fats, vitamins and minerals, that make it more nutritious than traditional milk. This milk has zero hormones, antibiotics, steroid or lactose inside. Its creators also claim it has a longer shelf-life.The company plans to bring their first product, probably cheese, to market later this year. According to Perfect Day’s website, when compared to conventional milk production, their process uses 65% less energy, generates 84% less greenhouse gas emissions and requires 91% less land and 98% less water. Another step towards food sustainability.Source: Perfect Day Foods. Image: FODMAP Monash [post_title] => Animal Free Cow Milk [post_excerpt] => A San Francisco-based start up discovered a way to "brew" milk that has zero hormones, antibiotics, steroid or lactose inside, and a longer shelf-life. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => animal-free-cow-milk [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-13 12:15:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-13 10:15:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=75703/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75558 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-06-08 17:33:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-08 15:33:08 [post_content] => Not grown in a field but programmed on a computer. MIT’s futuristic pasta is a 2D printed edible, natural material that turns into a designed 3D shape when dunked into boiling water. It’s morphing time!The project called Transformative Appetite was developed by the Tangible Media Group, and in particular by Lining Yao, Chinese designer specialized in Smart and Living Materials. In her vision a natural element, water, is used as stimulant to trigger the transformation process.The programmable pasta is a mix of gelatine, cellulose and starch. Gelatine naturally expands when absorbing water, giving the researchers a way to manipulate the food. In order to achieve controllable bending behavior, the team introduced ethyl cellulose strips as both shape constraints and water barriers on top of the film.“With this process something usually extremely functional as food becomes esthetical” Yao explained. “Consumers could create their personal pasta shape and customize the transformation through a online software”. But this newly designed pasta does not just look amazing on the plate, it might also contribute to a more sustainable way of transporting food. Containing 67% less air than a conventional macaroni package, the approach of shape-shifting pasta would save a lot of space and therefore energy.According to Yao the transformative pasta has a good texture, but she confessed “it does not have the traditional pasta flavor yet”. That’s why she is currently in contact with Italian pasta manufacturer Barilla, “the next step is to make it taste like real pasta” she told us. The team also worked with chef Matthew Delisle from Boston to craft a selection of dishes, test sauce combinations and different variations, such as plankton ink and squid flavored pasta.While computer pasta sounds more like a bunch of knotted cables rather than a delicious dish, it deserves at least a try, because what does your macaroni do?A tip for our Italian friends: tonight, June 7, at 19:30 Lining Yao will take the podium at Meet the Media Guru in Milan to explain this and many other projects. The event is free!Post by Julie Reindl and Alessia Andreotti [post_title] => Transformative Appetite: Shape-Shifting Pasta [post_excerpt] => MIT Media Lab developed pasta programmed on a computer. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => transformative-appetite-pasta [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-10 15:38:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-10 13:38:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=75558/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 74569 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-05-13 10:11:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-13 08:11:16 [post_content] => From the supermarket with no employees to “tattooing” fruits and vegetables with a laser, Swedish enterprises are stepping their supermarket game up. Say goodbye to stick-on labels that ruin the taste of your product and welcome plastic-free laser branding.Named ‘natural branding’, this hi-tech formula is set to create enormous savings in plastic, energy and CO2 emissions, while keeping your food tasty. Currently in use to brand organic avocados and sweet potatoes, Swedish supermarket chain ICA started using low-energy carbon dioxide lasers to imprint the skin of fruits and vegetables last year. The chain, which has 1.350 stores across the country, aims to replace the current stickers and packaging system with this technique to brand its organic products. Fun fact: Marks & Spencer is also using it on their coconuts in the UK. After an unsuccessful trial on lemons, the store found that the citrus skin ‘healing’ ability led to the ineffectiveness of the treatment.Laser labeling has been used in Australia and New Zealand since 2009 and was first approved for use in European Union countries in 2013. With the UK and Sweden leading the way, it should be a matter of time for other countries to follow. While ICA currently limits the technique only to avocados and sweet potatoes, branded broccoli and engraved eggplants may as well be next. We cannot wait to get tribal-tattooed tomatoes on our plate!Source: Treehugger [post_title] => Tattooing Fruits and Veggies with Lasers [post_excerpt] => Eco-friendly lasers might soon replace stick-on labels on fruits and veggies. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tattooing-fruits-veggies-lasers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-13 10:11:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-13 08:11:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=74569/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 73903 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-05-09 11:40:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-09 09:40:08 [post_content] => Usually, insects and bugs are not our favorite companions. Not anymore in Japan. Tokyo restaurants are turning their attention to edible insects. Fancy some insect-laden ramen?As the world population expands, the food problem will become increasingly severe, so we need to develop a different approach to what we eat. Japanese people are already one step forward in the choice of their dishes. A well-know restaurant called Ramen Nagi put bugs on its menu on April 9th, combining them with the traditional recipe of ramen. The result: a huge queue in front of the venue and 100 bowls of insect tsukemen sold out in just four hours.While insects are eaten and known for their good protein source in different countries such as China, Thailand and in some Australian indigenous tribes, the Japanese trend dish hasn’t yet fully arrived in western nations. A customer at Ramen Nagi described the taste of the insect dish similar to "deep fried shrimp", which doesn’t sound bad at all. Considering the limited space that the little creatures need to grow, the small environmental footprint they cause and the amount of proteins they provide, we might soon fill our Instagram feed with pictures of this Japanese insect delicacy.Source: Tree Hugger. Image: The Straits Times [post_title] => Insect Ramen: the New Food Trend [post_excerpt] => Tokyo restaurant offers sustainable new dish - ramen noodles topped with crunchy insects and people love it [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => insect-ramen-new-food-trend [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-09 11:40:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-09 09:40:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=73903/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 73323 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-04-17 08:53:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-17 06:53:22 [post_content] => Honey, I shrunk the… stove? Let us introduce you to the wonderful world of tiny cooking. The avid YouTube user probably already discovered this viral trend in 2014, but a recent Kickstarter campaign is bringing the miniature utensils to our real-sized kitchens.You would be surprised to hear that cooking is the first technology humans ever invented. This invention allowed our ancestors to pre-digest food before eating, which led to bigger brains and basically allowed evolution to do its part by turning them into the modern human beings we are today.As modern human beings, we do modern things. Watching YouTube videos in our spare time is one of them. Try searching for ‘tiny cooking’ and be amazed by the search results you will get. From tiny tacos to a tiny strawberry shortcake and tiny fried chicken and waffles. It’s a form of art. The trend started in Japan in 2014 due to the cultural dominance of kawaii (all things cute), but nowadays has become widely known and moved from the world of toys and accessories to edible ingredients. Fun fact: in 2015, a report from Tubular Labs indicated that tiny cooking videos contributed up to three percent of the total views in the food category on YouTube.So, where does one purchase such a tiny kitchen stove? On Kickstarter, naturally. Tastemade (one of the leading tiny kitchen platforms) developed a miniature stove for their tiny cooking fanbase and shared its workability on Instagram, when they baked 42 tiny donuts with the set in just one hour. We cannot wait to see what's next for this viral trend and are sitting on the edge of our seats for the moment tiny in-vitro burgers and tiny lab-grown chickens will be served from the tiny kitchen. [post_title] => Tiny Food Made in a Tiny Kitchen [post_excerpt] => A small introduction to tiny cooking. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tiny-cooking [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-18 23:55:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-18 21:55:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=73323/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72562 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-03-26 10:12:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-26 09:12:51 [post_content] => We all crave a freshly tapped glass of milk every now and then. That's why designers Anastasia Eggers and Ottonie von Roeder came up with Cow On Tour, a winning concept to tap your own milk from a cow around the corner. The cow in question carries a milk machine on its back, which is driven by methane gasses from its own farts, turning the animal into a walking vending machine for milk.Tap fresh milk from your neighbor's cowAccording to the designers' website: "Cow on Tour transforms the cow into a self-sufficient machine for milk production. Methane gas collected from a cow is used as a fuel to power the milking machine. The system allows the animals to move independently in green spaces of a city and provides an online service that makes it possible for the user to easily locate a cow of their choice and collect milk from her. Cow on Tour brings the milk back to the people".Tap fresh milk from your neighbor's cowCow On Tour is one of the finalists of the Post-Fossil City Contest. The designers will receive €1,000 to further work on the project with the support of the Urban Futures Studio's curatorial team. [post_title] => Tap Your Milk from a Cow Around the Corner [post_excerpt] => Turning cows into walking vending machines for milk. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cow-on-tour [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-23 17:13:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-23 16:13:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72562/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71889 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-03-16 10:00:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-16 09:00:33 [post_content] => By taking a look at human evolution, we quickly notice that food gathering and production - also known as agriculture - has always been an important constant in our daily life, at least for most of our ancestors. With the industrialization of food this changed drastically and disconnected nine out of ten people from the production of the fuel that powers our bodies. Now that our "hunting ground" is the supermarket, we lost that connection with soil, animals, plants, seasons and climate, but also the direct link between labor and income.As our culture loves to romanticize about what once our nature was, it might seem a paradox that today we play FarmVille in our free time. Ten years ago, people started to virtually plant crops, feed animals and exchange harvest with their digital neighbors. All for the sake of fun, while our food is produced in enormous farm factories hundreds of kilometers away from where we life.Japanese Company Telefarm took the virtual farming to the next level in order to reconnect with the production of actual physical food. Enkaku Bokujo, or “Remote Farm”, is an online farming simulator that allows its players to rent a piece of virtual land that corresponds to a plot in the real world and lets you grow your own vegetables. By paying around 4.50 $ per square meter a month, you co-work with robotics that re-enact your online click in the physical world. You can then choose to either get the harvest for your own use or sell it to Telefarms vegetable market. To make the online farm more game-like, its creator introduced some challenges to face, such as bug plagues (of course just virtual once), which make the player earn extra coins by dealing good with those kind of situations.With an ever growing world population and more need for food, we need to reconsider the future of agriculture. Maybe this example gives us an startingpoint to do so.Source: Mirror. Image: Rocketnews [post_title] => FarmVille Turns into Real-Life Agriculture [post_excerpt] => A Japanese Start up brings Farmville back into real life by letting players grow physical food. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => real-life-farmville [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-15 16:13:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-15 15:13:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71889/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72111 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-03-11 09:56:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-11 08:56:54 [post_content] => Meet Chef 3D, the commercial 3D pizza printer that takes your order via a smartphone app. Simply select your pizza ingredients and the pizzabot will be on its way. Last year, the company behind the robotic chef obtained a grant from NASA to develop the project. Later this year, Chef 3D will make its appearance at theme parks, sports stadiums and shopping malls. Compared to human workers, "the robot is faster, cleaner, and more consistent". And besides that, it will be possible to upload a jpg image to the menu and the robot will mimic it to perfection. Buon appetito!Source: Business Insider. Image: Jeffrey Hosier [post_title] => 3D Print Your Pizza in Six Minutes [post_excerpt] => Meet the commercial 3D pizza printer that takes your order via a smartphone app. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3d-print-pizza-6-minutes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-11 09:56:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-11 08:56:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72111/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 113755 [post_author] => 2151 [post_date] => 2019-07-02 10:39:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-02 09:39:08 [post_content] =>

A few years ago, convincing meat-free “meat” was nothing more than a distant dream for most consumers. Meat substitutes in supermarkets lacked variety and quality. Plant-based burgers were few and far between in major fast food outlets – and meaty they were not.

But realistic alternatives to environmentally damaging meat are now big business – and global fast food chains are finally starting to take notice.

Burger King has announced that after a hugely successful trial, it will roll out its partnership with plant-based meat company Impossible Foods across the US. McDonalds recently introduced the similarly meaty Big Vegan TS in its outlets in Germany, one of its five largest international markets.

Now finally able to produce meat-free imitations that are for many indistinguishable from their beefy counterparts, the rapidly growing industry appears set to make serious waves in the once impregnable bastions of cheap meat. In so doing, it could kickstart a rapid decline in meat’s contribution to the climate crisis – driven not just by a global minority of vegans and vegetarians, but by millions of meat-eaters too.

Joining the meatless burger bandwagon

Thanks to rising interest in food technology from Silicon Valley’s start-up scene, such indistinguishable vegan meat came on the menu a little over five years ago. Helped by huge investments, sophisticated marketing, and a friendly regulatory environment, US companies leaped to the forefront of vegan meat innovation. Products such as the Impossible Burger and the Beyond Burger soon entered into many smaller US restaurants and fast food outlets, before Burger King made it widely available across the country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng4C2HMH664

In contrast, for a long time, tighter food regulations in Europe stifled meatless meat innovation. Thanks to the European Union’s precautionary principle, companies face much more stringent checks to show that new ingredients and foods aren’t harmful before they can go on sale. Quorn, a low-cost meat substitute that is now a household name, took almost ten years to be approved as a legitimate foodstuff, because its use of fungi was unprecedented.

These tight regulations also stipulate that genetically modified ingredients have to be labelled, which may explain why the widely heralded Impossible Burger – which uses genetically modified yeast to produce the blood-like plant protein that tastes so much like beef – has not yet landed in European countries.

Combined with differences in language, food culture and investment climate across European states, innovative start-ups looking to bring high-quality meat analogues took longer to thrive in Europe.

But while the US may have had a head-start in high-quality vegan meat innovation, it may surprise you to know that plant-based alternatives are much more popular in parts of Europe. While some European states such as France, Portugal and Switzerland are yet to warm to fake meat, the average Briton (750g) or Swede (725g) consumed nearly twice as many meat alternatives in 2018 as in the US (350g), where vegan meats are have typically been more realistic and thus higher-priced than in much of Europe.

With the market growing at times by orders of magnitude as traditional meat-eaters switched on to plant-based products, it was only a matter of time before major European companies started cottoning on to the potential of high-quality meat imitations.

In 2017, McDonald’s was quick to roll out a vegan burger, the McVegan, at its restaurants in Finland and Sweden. But it was not designed to closely resemble meat, and was marketed primarily at vegans.

In the UK, where more than half of British people have either already reduced or are considering reducing their meat consumption, Greggs decided to blaze the trail. Having only last year considered vegan sausage rolls “too difficult” a proposition, they are now returning record profits thanks to an offering so popular that the bakery has struggled to keep up with demand.

In traditionally meaty Germany, meat alternatives were practically non-existent ten years ago. But Germans now aren’t far off the USA in fake meat consumption, thanks in part to prominent processed meat brands entering the market. It’s no coincidence that McDonald’s in Germany has since decided to partner with Nestlé, a new major player in the meatless meat game, to offer a vegan burger there.

The market for plant-based meat is rapidly growing across Europe and the USA. Malte Roedl/Euromonitor International, Author provided

If news of out-of-reach vegan burgers is giving you food envy, there is no need to worry. Different cultures, tastes, prices and administrative hurdles mean that developments will not happen everywhere at the same time. But in the next couple of years, expect to see a lot more plant-based meat coming to fast food chains near you.

Realistic chicken imitations have thus far proved difficult to master, but KFC plans to trial a vegan version of its chicken fillet burger from June 17. Meanwhile Burger King is already exploring how best to bring its vegan burger to Europe.

And, given the whopping 30% increase in sales brought by the Impossible Whopper, McDonald’s and Nestlé are already considering expanding their partnership beyond Germany.

Crucially, these fast-food vegan meats are not just aimed at vegans and vegetarians, but meat-lovers too, who still make up the vast majority of the country populations across the world. The Impossible Whopper, for example, is marketed not as a planet-saving treat, but a healthier way to enjoy the same meaty taste their customers are used to.

Some vegans baulk at the idea of replicating the taste of animal flesh – but the bigger picture is that such products will play a major role in realising projections that the majority of “meat” will not come from dead animals by 2040.

Taste and health still far outweigh concern for the environment and animal welfare as factors that determine whether people are willing to purchase plant-based meat. By tapping into these, vegan meat can massively reduce the hefty emissions burden and animal suffering caused by animal agriculture.

Bring on the vegan meat revolution, I say.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

[post_title] => A vegan meat revolution is coming to global fast food chains [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => vegan-meat-revolution-fast-food [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-02 13:44:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-02 12:44:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=113755 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 272 [max_num_pages] => 28 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 06f051403103f8ba810bb24984d6dff5 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
load more