126 results for “The-map-is-the-territory”

Celebrating Dutch Water Protection:
Last Weeks to See ‘Gates of Light’

Kelly Streekstra
January 3rd 2018
If you are in The Netherlands you can explore the latest art project by Studio Roosegaarde and discover the iconic, yet historical value of the Closing Dike.

The Birth of a Digital Nation in Estonia

Daniel Fraga
August 30th 2017

Due to its digital citizenship program, something interesting is happening in Estonia. In July there were more new applications for e-citizenship than newborn babies. Are we witnessing the birth of the world's first digital nation?…

Interview: Curator Ilari Laamanen on Momentum9, the Nordic Biennial

Ruben Baart
August 4th 2017
We recently spoke to Ilari Laamanen, to peel the outcrops of Momemtum9, and unveil the overlapping themes to the next nature philosophy.

Otra Nation: Make Walls Great Again

Elle Zhan Wei
April 26th 2017
This group of 14 designers, engineers, builders and architects make a proposal of a wall for Trump's ambitious project.

Space Television Network

Julie Reindl
February 17th 2017
Sen is a space television network that provides visuals from other planets in order to prepare us for our multi-planetary life.

The Global Subway Map of the Future

Ruben Baart
January 23rd 2017
The Hyperloop will turn the world into a global village.

Australia Moves Too Fast for GPS

Mathilde Nakken
December 4th 2016
The entire continent of Australia has shifted and that's a problem for GPS, meteorologists, automated cars and even drones.

Disney Causes Tourism Overload in Norway

Ruben Baart
September 28th 2016
Disney's Frozen is causing tourism overload in Norway, and it's not sure if that is a good thing.

Who Owns the Map?

Ruben Baart
August 21st 2016
In their pursuit of mapping the physical world online, mapping services simultaneously shape our understanding of it too.

Geography Class via Smartphone

Ruben Baart
August 15th 2016
A new Google Maps app is designed to get kids exploring the Himalayas without having to actually go outside.
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It helped men to turn a sea into a lake, safer shorelines and a new province. When you’re around the coming weeks, you can explore the latest art project of NNN ambassador Daan Roosegaarde and discover the iconic, yet historical value of the Closing Dike. And yes, it’s worth a drive.The closing dike was constructed in 1932 to decrease the flood risk of coastline of the surprisingly low-lying Netherlands. What used to be the salty Zuiderzee, is now the freshwater IJssellake behind the dike, as well as a man-made province of reclaimed land: Flevoland. This province is about five meters below sea level. After 85 years of intensive use of the dike as protection and as a central road, the dike is undergoing intensive renovations to sustain under the projected heightening of the water levels of the IJssel lake and the Wadden Sea.The Closing Dike is not only a symbol of the long Dutch history of water protection, it may also be viewed as an iconic center of innovation, recreation and creativity. For instance, the dike is inspiring the implementation of blue energy: a method for generating energy from the chemical difference between the salt and fresh water. Moreover, it is home to recreational venues for the public, a visitor center and a new Wadden Center, to be opened in 2018, telling the story of the Wadden Sea and the Dutch Delta Design.Studio Roosegaarde highlights the iconic Closing Dike with some art installations. Drive through the Gates of Light, see the green wind-energy generating kites in the Windvogel installation, and pop out of the car to experience the Glowing Nature installation in a historical bunker with live bioluminescent algae. The exhibit can be seen until the 21th of January. [post_title] => Celebrating Dutch Water Protection:
Last Weeks to See 'Gates of Light' [post_excerpt] => If you are in The Netherlands you can explore the latest art project by Studio Roosegaarde and discover the iconic, yet historical value of the Closing Dike. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => latest-project-studio-roosegaarde [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-04 10:35:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-04 09:35:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79507/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 76941 [post_author] => 859 [post_date] => 2017-08-30 10:00:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-30 08:00:16 [post_content] => Due to its digital citizenship program, something interesting is happening in Estonia. In July there were more new applications for e-citizenship than newborn babies. Are we witnessing the birth of the world's first digital nation?

A Digital Nation?

Despite counting only about one million inhabitants, Estonia is known for its outsized impact in the digital world. Skype, for example, comes from Estonia. And since December 2014, they've been allowing people from all over the world to become Digital Estonian citizens through an e-residency program. Many international companies and individuals have sought to become digital Estonians, because of the country's favorable entrepreneurial and business environment.The ability to start a business remotely in a tech-friendly EU country has been the main factor driving applications. And applications are on the rise, with many well-known and influential people leading the way including Japan's prime-minister Shinzō Abe, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and even the host of The Daily Show, Trevor Noah. As a result, Estonia is becoming more than just a traditional nation. It is now turning into a "digital nation". And the opportunities this initiative provides make it an exceptional project for our digital era. Factors like location-independent international business and using government backed authentication technology are some of the reasons listed by people who apply. The amount of weekly e-residency applications is on the verge of surpassing the number of weekly births. This means that the digital population of Estonia is growing faster than its real population.

More E-Residents Than Babies

According to recent data in the last week of July, 270 babies were born in the whole of Estonia. In the same period, there were 269 new e-Residency applications from all over the world. These numbers often fluctuate, as you can see here, yet they are clear enough to prove a point: 22.000 people from 138 countries have chosen to become digital Estonians, bringing with them flourishing business and entrepreneurial opportunities. According to the Estonian president Kersti Kaljulaid, governments need to continuously innovate in order to remain relevant in the digital era.[caption id="attachment_76959" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Information from the program's official Twitter page.[/caption]This is one of the many initiatives this country has taken to lead the way into the governance of the digital age. Other initiatives include secure online voting, tax filling and all sort of government registrations.The UK is one of the countries whose citizens are looking at Estonia to advance their business, especially after Brexit. Also, the Estonian bureaucratic infra-structure is also very high quality, offering an easier way to deal with business than other countries. Seems like User Interface is quickly becoming an important factor in international economic competition.

Estcoins: An Estonian Cryptocurrency

As a consequence of the success of the e-residency program, a wide conversation has also begun around an Estonian cryptocurrency. A cryptocurrency is a digital currency that uses encryption techniques to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank.[caption id="attachment_76956" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Bitcoin and Ethereum are two popular forms of cryptocurrency.[/caption]An Estonian digital currency could be a potentially valuable additions to the e-residency program. Their inherent advantages would combine with the transparency and regulation that the backing of the Estonian state would provide.In conclusion, incorporating digital currencies in the Estonian already advanced and tech-friendly infra-structure would be another step towards the digitization of government and finance. As a small technologically advanced nation, Estonia has the ideal conditions to pioneer new ways to govern and to do business in the 21st century. Will this prove to be a wise move on the Baltic nation's behalf? Will other countries take its lead?Sources: Kaspar Korjus' Medium PageThe Next WebTelegraph, Wired. Image: Estonia.ee [post_title] => The Birth of a Digital Nation in Estonia [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => estonia-more-e-residents-than-babies [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-29 11:33:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-29 09:33:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=76941/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 76634 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-08-04 10:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-04 08:00:22 [post_content] => This year Momentum, the Nordic biennial, celebrates its ninth edition in the lush landscape of Moss, Norway. Taking the thematic approach of Alienation, the team of curators (Ulrika Flink (SE), Ilari Laamanen (FI), Jacob Lillemose (DK), Gunhild Moe (NO) and Jón B.K Ransu (IS)) seeks to extrapolate new perspectives on the human condition subjected to the rapidly changing interconnected world through transdisciplinary explorations. Presenting a group of internationally renowned artists, the biennial addresses topical concerns of cultural and geographical borders, biopolitics and social inequality, to outline a series of strategies towards "extraordinary futures". We recently talked with one of the curators of the biennial, Ilari Laamanen, to peel the outcrops of the exhibition and explore its similarities with the next nature philosophy.
The idea of pure, untouched nature is long lost
We are intrigued by the curatorial concept of this year’s biennial, Alienation, can you tell us a bit about it? The starting point of the concept was the realization that the world we live is widely disconnected, hard to comprehend, and oftentimes irrational. It seems to be more and more difficult to find a common ground in terms of ideology and philosophy, as the changes in nature, technology and society are rapid and concurrent. This time we live in cries for cross-pollination of methods and new knowledge.People also seem to be more and more lost with the sense of community. Many things might be more shared than before, yet it seems that on a fundamental humane level we are isolated from one another, and alienated even from our immediate surroundings. Our curatorial team invited contributors with different backgrounds to tackle these issues through an interdisciplinary approach and speculation.[caption id="attachment_76643" align="aligncenter" width="426"] Patricia Piccinini, Atlas, Silicone, fiberglass, human hair, car paint, 84x54x50cm, 2012.[/caption]It can be said that the theme of the biennial is related to the next nature topic. What is next nature for you?The idea of pure, untouched nature is long lost. We are forced to look at the consequences of human actions on the planet. The idea of next nature relates intimately to our habitat. The domestication and endless utilization of different species is a valid concern, as are the effects of the countless substances that are migrating into our bodies, with and without us being aware of them, thus different kind of variations of nature and human-made systems are connected to this phenomenon. It is also fascinating to contemplate what kind of hybrids we are ourselves and what we might turn into in the future.Are we becoming cyborgs?I believe that some of the more interesting developments focus on physical body. Indeed, it is not far-fetched to say that our lives are becoming more and more cyborg-like. People use technology to build, enhance and keep track of their bodies. Technology provides means to help people support their malfunctioned systems and enables them to alter or change their gender.
Solastalgia is a sense of existential distress and alienation caused by climate change
A new sense of freedom comes with all these developments, but there’s perhaps some melancholy too, as many of our actions are detrimental to environment. In the biennial, artist Jussi Kivi presents Moon Woods, a nocturnal scenario made of mostly synthetic materials. Kivi’s diorama channels the concept of solastalgia, a sense of existential distress and alienation from one’s most immediate surroundings caused by climate change. This sense of being fundamentally out of place, or longing for something, seems typical of our time.Can you elaborate on the ecological perspective in relation to the body?One should also think of plastic waste in the ocean and how that is affecting different species inhabiting the waters. The litters the fish and crustaceans consume change them and when consumed by people our bodies get affected too. In a similar way, the water we put into our bodies is affected by countless of chemicals and it is becoming quite difficult to find waters that haven’t been polluted yet. In Momentum 9, Pinar Yoldas focuses on this issue and presents new kinds of crossbreeds our actions might produce in a not so distant future.[caption id="attachment_76644" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Pinar Yoldas, Ecosystem of Excess, Detail of an installation, 2014.[/caption]One of our research topics ‘Wild Systems’ investigates how our systems have become so complex that they now behave like independent ecologies (think about an algorithm running our financial systems, or GM organisms thriving in the wild). How to cope with that?Humans did not bring the nature into being and they cannot fully control it. So from this perspective one wants to start considering if there is enough respect towards nature. While a lot of progress is being constantly made in all disciplines, the big mystery remains: how do all the developments and breakthroughs connect to one another, or do they even?So many of the existing systems around - and within - us are still too complex for us to understand. Think the potential of microbes, for instance, and how they affect our physical being and even consciousness. Sonja Bäumel’s Being Encounter is a work in the biennial that address this issue: although we claim to know so much about the things surrounding us, we are oftentimes clueless when it comes to mapping the processes in our bodies.
So many of the existing systems around us are still too complex for us to understand
Jenna Sutela’s work circles around complex biological and computational systems. For the Momentum 9 Biennial she created two site-specific installations. Let’s Play: Life depicts a computer playing through the Game of Life that simulates systems in the real world. It has been proposed as a model for the self-replication of robots. Her second installation Sporulating Paragraph introduces an alien organism operating like a microscopic machine or virus and taking the form of a living graffiti. The work, inspired by 2014 Jeff VanDerMeer’s novel Annihilation, seeks to interfere with our fundamental illusion of control.Do you think technology alienates people from people? I don’t think that technology alienates people from people per se, I would rather say that it is becoming more and more important to cultivate our inter-human relationships in favor of virtual ones. New technological equipment or gadget does not automatically mean progress, as the media theorists like Friedrich Kittler and Marshall McLuhan stated decades ago. On a similar note: not every message delivered through media is factual. Thus criticality towards media and the ability to be self-reflective becomes more crucial than ever before.
Criticality towards media and the ability to be self-reflective becomes more crucial than ever before
Is technology capable of enhancing our humanity?Advancements in technology have enabled freer access to information and data than earlier, so at least in theory this should create greater understanding of us as humans and how we should act and interact on this planet. When we consider the Western culture and its strong embrace of dichotomies and categories, it would be easy to feel worried about technology taking over nature. But as we might want to take a more holistic approach and see all things on some level connected, it would make sense to accept the growing role of technology in our lives and rather make the connection to the fundamental human need to expand its intellect, creativity and ability to invent.[caption id="attachment_76646" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Mediated Matter, Synthetic Arpiary, Honeybee Hive Installation in the Synthetic Apiary environment, excerpt from a video, 2016.[/caption]What does science fiction mean to you? Science fiction can be a useful tool for both speculating future, and touching upon current matters from a distanced perspective. Take Momentum 9 artist Kapwani Kiwanga, for instance, who in her Afrogalactica performance series intentionally confuses truth and fiction to unsettle hegemonic narratives and to create spaces in which marginal discourses can flourish.
How much of our fear is part of cultural conditioning and fiction?
When considering mainstream film productions in the science fiction genre, the setup is typically built around the threat against humanity and this planet we inhabit. A big question in relation to the theme of the biennial is: does the threat come from the external environment or from within? And how much of the fear people feel is constructed inside their heads and how much of it is part of cultural conditioning and fiction?Instead of thinking about stereotypical creatures from outer space, our curatorial team leaned more towards abstract nowhere, where the question is not so much about the threat anymore, but about the realization that we are constantly exposed to, and invited to engage with, matters previously unfamiliar to us. In terms of science fiction related inspiration, Todd Haynes film Safe (1995) and Dennis Villeneuve’s Arrival (2016) are some examples of the more nuanced works that resonate with the biennial’s thematics.[caption id="attachment_76645" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Museum of Nonhumanity, installation view at Suvilahti, Helsinki, 2016. Photo by Terike Haapoja.[/caption]Tell us about the role that insects play in the biennial.In the context of this biennial, the idea of an alien is not necessarily something that comes from outer space, but can be more likely found in our everyday surroundings. The relationship between humans and insects is too often simply utilitarian, or insects are considered a nuisance. We wanted to shed light on this complex relationship through three different works, which can be also seen as connected to the broader themes of the biennial.Mediated Matter by Neri Oxman tackles the issue of possible bee extinction (caused by strong pesticides) through their ‘Synthetic Apiary’. The video documentation, featured in Momentum 9 highlights the pioneering project that enabled the birth of first ever bee in a synthetic, man-made environment. The work is typical for Mediated Matter who, as they put it, “focuses on the nature-inspired design and design-inspired nature”.
The idea of an alien is not necessarily something that comes from outer space, but can be found in our everyday surroundings
Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson’s Fly Factory breeds insect larvae for human consumption. The project started from the designer’s desire to offer more sustainably produced protein and to alleviate potential food shortages in the future. The factory feeds insects on food waste and recycles nutrients they excrete as fertilizer.Lastly, Museum of Nonhumanity, a project by artist Terike Haapoja and author Laura Gustafsson presents the history of the distinction between the humans and other animals, and how this imaginary boundary has been used to oppress human and nonhuman beings. In the section of the museum that deals with disgust, insects are used as an example of species of lesser value: and how certain types of insects have been also used as abusive names for people of lesser value. The project illuminates the worst sides of human actions towards nature and one another. It also makes the audience contemplate their own mechanisms of making distinction between themselves and the others.
No man is an island
The biennial takes place in Moss, Norway; how important is the geographical location - or Nordic context, as you put it - for the exhibit?While years ago the biennial started out as a platform for Nordic art and talent, it became an international, thematic exhibition that addresses topical, important issues in culture and visual arts. For this edition’s curatorial team it was important to spend as much time as possible in the Norwegian city of Moss, where the biennial takes place, to build a connection between the featured works and the local surroundings.I, for instance, found it highly interesting that Momentum Kunsthall, one of the main exhibition venue of the biennial, used to be a brewery. It was also fascinating to learn more about the ecosystem of the neighboring river and how it was in danger of being severely damaged due to plans of building new tower blocks in that area. Furthermore, I got the chance to familiarize with an amazing collection of old taxidermy animals and laboratory equipment from local schools. It was great to collaborate with many of the local people who do not come from the art or design background.What makes the biennial stand out?What makes this biennial stand out is its genuine concern about the topics it addresses - and the very special group of contributors it features. Nordic contemporary art scene, or cultural field in the general, is not strongly market-driven, which enables different kinds of practices and a sense of freedom in the decision-making. While connected to the local, the biennial also has international ambitions, and the featured works take part in discussions that deal with topical issues of our contemporary culture all over the world: no man is an island.Ilari Laamanen is a curator based in New York City. Having a background in media studies and cultural studies in Nordic Universities, he focuses on thematic, interdisciplinary projects. Recent curatorial work includes: Momentum 9: Alienation (Moss, Norway, 2017), Fashion after Fashion (Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 2017), and Ordered Dance (Station Independent Projects, NYC, 2017).You can find Momentum9: Alienation until October 11th at various locations in Moss, Norway. Watch the trailer below.[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/226262991[/vimeo]Want to stay up to date about the latest next nature news, events and other NNN projects? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Interview: Curator Ilari Laamanen on Momentum9, the Nordic Biennial [post_excerpt] => We recently spoke to Ilari Laamanen, to peel the outcrops of Momemtum9, and unveil the overlapping themes to the next nature philosophy. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interview-ilari-laamanen [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-12 18:57:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-12 16:57:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=76634/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 73740 [post_author] => 1324 [post_date] => 2017-04-26 11:01:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-26 09:01:19 [post_content] => We know Donald Trump wants to build a wall: a massive project of 3.100 km to separate Mexico and US. He asked for border wall designs and got something else. Out of over 200 proposals submitted to the Department of Homeland Security, one stands out greatly. A Mexican American design and engineering collective named MADE submitted a beautiful proposal: Otra Nation.This group of 14 designers, engineers, builders and architects bend Trump’s idea in segregating. In fact, no real borders are planned in their wall project. Rather, they envision a bridge between two countries. Otra Nation requires maintenance effort from both countries in equal measure. It will be used as path for hyperloop high-speed transport system, agriculture and more. With a solar energy powered system and inviting design, it will act as a connector between two countries. MADE calls it "the world’s first continental bi-natural socio-ecotone". Citizens of this new special economic zone would retain citizenship to either the US or Mexico, in addition to gaining a place in Otra Nation; a sort of dual citizenship.The collective explains the reason behind the proposal: "Mexico and the United States have always prospered when they see each others strengths by working together". They firmly believe that the solution lies in a deeper cooperation from both sides with the newest technology, to bring a future people desire. "Let’s build a future with next century technology" they say, "at the cost of the last".Source: Otra Nation. Image: NPR. [post_title] => Otra Nation: Make Walls Great Again [post_excerpt] => This group of 14 designers, engineers, builders and architects make a proposal of a wall for Trump's ambitious project. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => otra-nation-make-wall-great-agin [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-29 11:12:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-29 09:12:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=73740/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71444 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-02-17 10:30:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-17 09:30:33 [post_content] => Always on the search for the better, for the unseen, humanity is steadily coming up with ideas to broaden its horizons. Literally. TV network Sen is creating a space television to broadcast images of space objects, robotic missions and explorations.After we became global citizens, Sen promises to turn us into a interplanetary species with a new form of entertainment around Earth, the Moon and Mars. Almost everything on our planet seems to have been explored by now, as a result off-world activities grow to become common interest. Likewise, in 2016 NASA introduced its virtual reality experience to let us explore the surface of Mars.A few decades ago, outer space used to be a almost blank page, leaving a gap for imagination with results in both amazement and anxiety. A number of apocalyptic movies picture a dazzling and uncanny vision of space and universe. As our evolutionary stage won’t allow us to physically travel into the cosmos at least not yet and if yes, just for a insignificant amount of selected people, Sen's vision is to let us get used to the view of our possible future homes, change our mindsets about it and see outer space as a local place.Thinking about the huge amount of information we consume daily, by trying to keep up with the latest happenings in the world, observing the surface of Mars might indeed be a zen way of watching television.Source: Sen [post_title] => Space Television Network [post_excerpt] => Sen is a space television network that provides visuals from other planets in order to prepare us for our multi-planetary life. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => multi-planet-television [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-16 16:46:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-16 15:46:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71444/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70739 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-01-23 15:34:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-23 14:34:15 [post_content] => In 2003, broadcaster and author Mark Ovenden designed the World Metro Map to present a global transportation system that connects cities through underground railways. His vision could end up becoming reality after all, now that LA-based company Hyperloop One has selected 35 teams as finalists in its global challenge to design the future of the vacuum-sealed train system.“It’s more than just a train, or a pod in a tube” said Josh Giegel, Hyperloop One’s president of engineering. “We’re taking it to a level of connectivity and really being the high-speed backbone of the future transportation network”. The current plan is to build three regional routes over the next five years. After that, the Hyperloop One aims to connect all constructions and build a giant network, similar to Ovenden's vision. Needless to say the map may not be completely accurate, it’s already envisioning an intercontinental transit network that holds the potential to reshape the global economy. In short, the hyperloop will turn the world into a global village.Source: Inverse. Image: Mark Ovenden [post_title] => The Global Subway Map of the Future [post_excerpt] => The Hyperloop will turn the world into a global village. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hyperloop-global-map-concept [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-26 10:39:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-26 09:39:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70739/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69080 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2016-12-04 08:51:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-04 07:51:29 [post_content] => Australia isn't where you think it is! The continent is moving seven centimeters (2.75 inches) up northwards each year. From 1994, when the current coordinates of Australia were set, the land has shifted 1.5 meters (4.9 feet). It might not seem like a big deal, but it is still enough to disrupt global navigation satellite systems, putting Australia out of sync. This affects GPS, meteorologists, automated cars and even drones. For example, without updating the GPS, a delivery drone will leave the package at your neighbor's house, instead of yours.Dan Jaksa from Geoscience Australia, says: "The we need to relocate for intelligent transportation systems that rely on the finer accuracy that will come with the next generation of GPS technology. Take the self driving car as an example. If you’re 1.5 meters out, you’re potentially on the wrong side of the road".In the last 50 years Australia has already been officially relocated on the map four times. Scientists are now planning to update all of Australia’s coordinates one more time by January 2017. Shifting not 1.5 meters, but 1.8 meters (5.9 feet) up north, towards the equator. This over estimation should align with Australia’s location in 2020, when a new system will be launched. Scientists, in fact, are developing a new system that will globally relocate all the coordinates regularly. So every tectonic shift will be registered on the planet map, making sure everybody in the world is on the same page.Source: Insider. Image: NASA [post_title] => Australia Moves Too Fast for GPS [post_excerpt] => The entire continent of Australia has shifted and that's a problem for GPS, meteorologists, automated cars and even drones. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => australia-continent-lost-world-map [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-06 13:00:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-06 12:00:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69080 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 66045 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-09-28 12:14:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-28 10:14:55 [post_content] => In March 2012 a team of Disney’s creatives booked a tour through Norway to find inspiration for their upcoming film "Frozen", or "Frost" as the movie is called in Norway. The breathtaking fjords, glacier lakes and snow-capped mountaintops served as the perfect backdrop for the Oscar-winning film. The animated feature not only broke box office records when it was released in 2013, it also boosted Norwegian tourism by 20%. And it's not sure if that is a good thing.The movie is set in a fictional Norwegian-like kingdom and was supported by the country’s tourism sector. The storybook village of Bergen was reportedly the inspiration for Anna and Elsa’s home of Arendelle. While most of the characters speak in American accent, VisitNorway broadly covered the feature on their homepage, tripling traffic to the country in 2014. Adventures by Disney, the company's guided tour division, also contributed to the tourism boom, launching a Frozen holiday package to Norway. This was their second tour package, following the success of a Scotland vacation modeled after "Brave".Last summer over one million visitors travelled to the Lofoten Islands in the Arctic Circle area, and this number is rising as Matt Damon is currently shooting scenes for his upcoming movie there. Authorities say the islands are reaching a breaking point. Its public facilities are being exhausted, which leads to problems with waste disposal, public toilets and car parking. Also the environment is suffering, causing waste in forests and severe erosion on the coastline. Nearby towns referred the situation as "challenging", and call for measures to counter the tourism in 2017.This is not the first time islands are overrun by tourists because of cinematographic successes, think about "The Lord of the Rings" and "Game of Thrones" for instance. There are many more uncharted landscapes in the world to explore, let’s hope that Hollywood is not going to get the best of it.Sources: The Guardian, Lonely Planet [post_title] => Disney Causes Tourism Overload in Norway [post_excerpt] => Disney's Frozen is causing tourism overload in Norway, and it's not sure if that is a good thing. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => norway-tourist-overload [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-09-28 12:14:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-09-28 10:14:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=66045 [menu_order] => 35 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 65391 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-08-21 17:22:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-21 15:22:57 [post_content] => Earlier this month, a group of Palestinian journalists published a statement accusing Google of deleting Palestine from Google Maps. The truth is, Google never acknowledged Palestine in the first place. In their pursuit of mapping the physical world online, these companies simultaneously shape our understanding of it too. This makes us wonder if the map really is the territory.Elizabeth Davidoff, Google's communications manager responded: “There has never been a ‘Palestine’ label on Google Maps, however we discovered a bug that removed the labels for ‘West Bank’ and ‘Gaza Strip’. We’re working quickly to bring these labels back to the area”.With over a billion monthly views, Google Maps is one of the world’s greater sources of geographic data and probably the first place you turn to when looking for a location. In fact, Google Maps is slowly becoming the first Universal Map. The first attempt dates back to 1891, when Albrecht Penck, a German geographer, proposed an International World Map as until that time there was no map of the planet. Unfortunately, Penck’s vision was never  finished.As smartphone usage keeps increasing, it's only a matter of time until one standardized map will be imposed to us. At least for now, some Palestinians have said that they are switching to Microsoft’s Bing Maps, as this service does label Palestine as its own. The valuable lesson we have learned today is that technology is not always neutral, companies like Google and Apple each present their own biased versions of the world.Source: EnGadget. Image: Adam Berry/AFP/Getty Images  [post_title] => Who Owns the Map? [post_excerpt] => In their pursuit of mapping the physical world online, mapping services simultaneously shape our understanding of it too. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => palestine-is-here [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-08-21 17:22:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-08-21 15:22:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65391 [menu_order] => 111 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 65302 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-08-15 15:49:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-15 13:49:18 [post_content] => Kids can now explore the Himalayas just using a new Google Maps app. A 500-foot Yeti, named Verne, will guide them on a virtual tour of the planet's highest peaks. The company has combined 3D graphics with their maps to create a unique experience for adventurous kids to traverse the outside world, staying inside.The educative nature of this app is meant for people to learn more about the Himalayas. The app allows users to "run up Mt Everest in seconds, skate across icy lakes, chase yaks, discover bits of information, ride a jetpack, play Himalayan instruments, and more".The Yeti is named after French novelist Jules Verne, who is best known for pioneering the science fiction genre and his fifty-four-novel-series Voyages Extraordinaires. Perhaps Verne: The Himalayas is just the first chapter of a series of explorations throughout the world.Google’s game is launched via its spin-off startup Niantic, the same developer that brought us Pokémon Go earlier this summer. Even though Verne does not offer aerobic exercises to its players, it surely demonstrates geography lessons can be more fun and interactive for kids.Story and image via Tech News Today [post_title] => Geography Class via Smartphone [post_excerpt] => A new Google Maps app is designed to get kids exploring the Himalayas without having to actually go outside. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => geography-class-smartphone [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://nextnature.net/2016/07/pokemon-go-curing-depression/ [post_modified] => 2016-08-17 12:09:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-08-17 10:09:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65302 [menu_order] => 122 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79507 [post_author] => 1510 [post_date] => 2018-01-03 10:00:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-03 09:00:35 [post_content] => The Afsluitdijk, a 32.5 km long protective dike that shorthened the coastline of The Netherlands drastically, is an eloquent example of manufactured landscape. It helped men to turn a sea into a lake, safer shorelines and a new province. When you’re around the coming weeks, you can explore the latest art project of NNN ambassador Daan Roosegaarde and discover the iconic, yet historical value of the Closing Dike. And yes, it’s worth a drive.The closing dike was constructed in 1932 to decrease the flood risk of coastline of the surprisingly low-lying Netherlands. What used to be the salty Zuiderzee, is now the freshwater IJssellake behind the dike, as well as a man-made province of reclaimed land: Flevoland. This province is about five meters below sea level. After 85 years of intensive use of the dike as protection and as a central road, the dike is undergoing intensive renovations to sustain under the projected heightening of the water levels of the IJssel lake and the Wadden Sea.The Closing Dike is not only a symbol of the long Dutch history of water protection, it may also be viewed as an iconic center of innovation, recreation and creativity. For instance, the dike is inspiring the implementation of blue energy: a method for generating energy from the chemical difference between the salt and fresh water. Moreover, it is home to recreational venues for the public, a visitor center and a new Wadden Center, to be opened in 2018, telling the story of the Wadden Sea and the Dutch Delta Design.Studio Roosegaarde highlights the iconic Closing Dike with some art installations. Drive through the Gates of Light, see the green wind-energy generating kites in the Windvogel installation, and pop out of the car to experience the Glowing Nature installation in a historical bunker with live bioluminescent algae. The exhibit can be seen until the 21th of January. [post_title] => Celebrating Dutch Water Protection:
Last Weeks to See 'Gates of Light' [post_excerpt] => If you are in The Netherlands you can explore the latest art project by Studio Roosegaarde and discover the iconic, yet historical value of the Closing Dike. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => latest-project-studio-roosegaarde [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-04 10:35:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-04 09:35:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79507/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 122 [max_num_pages] => 13 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0002b6ef8377e5d02d5039b702be2c24 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
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