77 results for “transparent-interfaces”

Smart Fabric Might Be the Key to the Future

Charlotte Kuijpers
December 5th 2017
Researchers designed a smart fabric able to encode data readable by a magnetometer, like the one in your phone, without electronics or batteries.

The Ephemeral Future of Internet Data

Nadine Roestenburg
March 13th 2017
What the Internet would look like if all data were ephemeral?

Scientists Connected a Brain to a Tablet

Ingmar Nieuweboer
April 24th 2016
Severely paralyzed woman controls a tablet with her brain.

Google’s Smart Interactive Clothing

Alessia Andreotti
June 4th 2015
Project Jacquard makes it possible to weave touch and gesture interactivity into any textile.

Google Wants to Tattoo a Phone Onto Your Throat

Jonathon Markowski
November 19th 2013
Google has just submitted a patent for lie-detecting throat tattoo that can also make calls.

Use a Touchscreen Without Touching it

Alessia Andreotti
October 15th 2013
UltraHaptics is a system for creating haptic feedback in mid-air, offering new kind of interactions with our touchscreens.

Control Your Mobile Phone or Tablet Directly from Your Brain

Marije Willemsen
May 6th 2013
Samsung is working on a brain interface that lets you go truly hands-free with your phone.

Transfer Your Window!

Jaap Arts
November 3rd 2012
Imagine you buy a special kind of window which you can place on your wall wherever you want, enabling you to get different views, not always looking at the same tree or house of your neighbors.

Illiterate Kids Learn to Hack Tablet Computers with No Outside Help

Allison Guy
October 31st 2012

The One Laptop Per Child program is experimenting with what at first seems to be the lazy way to philanthropy: dropping off tablet computers in remote Ethiopian villages and then simply leaving. Could illiterate children learn not only how to operate the Motorola Zooms, but teach themselves to read? According to  Nicholas Negroponte, founder of One Laptop Per Child, the results were astonishing:

“We left the boxes in the village. Closed. Taped shut. No instruction, no human being. I thought, the kids …

Book as Human-Computer Interface

Stefan Fincken
September 10th 2012
In combining the classic feeling of handling a book with the interactivity of the computer, Waldek W?grzyn of the Academy of Fine Arts in Katowice, Poland, has created a new human-computer interface.
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Its versatility has been proven once again in a paper by a team of researchers from the University of Washington. They designed a smart fabric able to encode data readable by a magnetometer, like the one in your phone, without the need of electronics or batteries.Using the built-in magnetometer, magnetic textile can be used for gesture control. In 2014, iOS developer Ivo Leko already made a video on real-time magnet position detection by an iPhone. He suggested the development of virtual keyboards, by using gloves with magnets. Magnetic embroidery could be a very classy realization of this idea.Magnetized thread can be used for more than just smartphone applications. It is able to store data, by creating a binary code out of differing positive and negative polarity on the fabric. The same principle is implemented by creating a 2D image on a piece of conducting cloth. This can originate a code similar to a QR code, but it may also exist of letters forming a word. Multiple magnetometers put together create a “scanner” or “detector” capable of reading the invisible code embedded in the smart fabric. This could be used for authentication, for example to open a door.For the key-losers among us, embroidering the password to enter your house on your sleeve might be a clever idea. But don’t forget to stay away from magnets!Source: MIT Technology Review [post_title] => Smart Fabric Might Be the Key to the Future [post_excerpt] => Researchers designed a smart fabric able to encode data readable by a magnetometer, like the one in your phone, without electronics or batteries. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => smart-fabric-key-future [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-05 10:04:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-05 09:04:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78285/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 72144 [post_author] => 1091 [post_date] => 2017-03-13 10:00:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-13 09:00:02 [post_content] => Since the introduction of computers and the Internet, the digital has been conceptualised as virtual, untouchable, and immaterial. The metaphor of ‘the cloud’ illustrates this very well. When you store your data in the cloud, you store your data on someone else’s computer. You might not see the computer and it might be on the other side of the world, but the fact that you can’t see it doesn’t mean it does not exist. Digital technologies are becoming more and more advanced, smaller, smarter, increasingly integrated with our bodies and environments.While we experience a world that is seamlessly connected through invisible technology, we tend to forget the ‘hidden’ technologies behind our digital tools (such as codes, softwares, 4G, Wi-Fi and cables).The Internet is a huge constellation of networks that are all connected to each other. Dutch artist Jeroen van Loon materializes the undersea network of Internet cables with the installation An Internet. Van Loon questions what the Internet would look like if all data were ephemeral. The Internet is made possible by glass fibre cables that stretch across the floor of the ocean. An Internet consists of a system of glass tubes that recreate the network of undersea Internet cables.The names of all 280 cables, like TAT-14, the cable between Great Britain and North America, WASC running between South Africa, West Afrika, Portugal and London, are converted into binary smoke signals. The smoke signals go into the glass tubes as temporary data. The glass tubes are filled with smoke until they start leaking and all the data is lost forever. An Internet not only visualizes the undersea network of Internet cables, it also represents a future vision of an Internet where data is ephemeral; data no longer created to be stored for the future, but only instantly accessible and then lost forever. A future where all data vanishes like the videos and photos taken with Snapchat.[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/152896199[/vimeo]An Internet was part of the exhibition Alien Matter, curated by Inke Arns, Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, 2 February - 5 March 2017.Source: Transmediale, Jeroen van Loon. Image: Jeroen van Loon [post_title] => The Ephemeral Future of Internet Data [post_excerpt] => What the Internet would look like if all data were ephemeral? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => future-data-internet-ephemeral [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://vimeo.com/152896199 [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 13:03:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 12:03:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=72144/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63126 [post_author] => 869 [post_date] => 2016-04-24 13:06:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-24 11:06:20 [post_content] => A middle-aged lady suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which causes progressive motor neuron damage, and paralyzed from the neck down was able to communicate with the outside world by controlling a Nexus Tablet to her brainwaves.Severely paralyzed patients are in a state called “locked-in”. They are fully aware of themselves and their surroundings, but they cannot move a finger. Dr. Paul Nuyujukian, a neuroengineer and physician from Stanford University, and his team succeeded in bypassing cumbersome eye or head tracking equipment, and instead created a customizable and affordable device that doesn't need physical electrodes. The device uses a tiny microarray chip with Bluetooth connection, which is directly implanted into the brain. Neural signals can be identified by complex algorithms and used in real time to control mouse cursors."We were going to design our own touchscreen hardware, but then realized the best ones were already on the market" Nuyujukian said. "So we went on Amazon instead and bought a Nexus 9 tablet. One of the upsides of this is that the interface, didn’t look like it was designed in the 80s. Also she now has access to the entire Android app store".The patient was able to Google questions about gardening, also thanks to the autocompletion feature of the search engine, which proved to be an incredibly helpful aid. She could easily navigate through links and use the standard QWERTY keyboard with ease."Our goal is to unlock the full user interface common to general-purpose computers and mobile devices" Nuyujukian explained. "This is a first step towards developing a fully-capable brain-controlled communication and computer interface for restoring function for people with paralysis".Source: Singularity HUB. Image: India future society [post_title] => Scientists Connected a Brain to a Tablet [post_excerpt] => Severely paralyzed woman controls a tablet with her brain. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => woman-controls-tablet-brain [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-24 13:07:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-24 11:07:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63126 [menu_order] => 268 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 45190 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2015-06-04 16:30:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-04 14:30:49 [post_content] => We are at the peak of wearable technology and Google's new project to turn your clothes into a hi-tech smart interface does nothing to reverse that. Project Jacquard is the latest ambitious idea by Ivan Poupyrev, Technical Program Lead at Google, aimed to make interactive clothing a reality.Google's ATAP (Advanced Technology and Projects) group as managed to create a way to build a conductive yarn using the same looms and machinery currently used in the textile industry. The team has also succeeded into integrating tiny electronics into textiles. Unlike regular conductive thread, like the kind used in various touch-screen-enabled gloves, this thread comes in any color and can be used in any existing industrial machine. When combined with a small Bluetooth controller, it could give any garment or piece of cloth the ability to pair with other devices and operate like a touch screen.

"Google is working on an ecosystem of apps and services that will let you interact with your phone and other gadgets just by grabbing, tapping, swiping, and touching your clothes" the company announced. "Project Jacquard makes it possible to weave touch and gesture interactivity into any textile using standard, industrial looms. Everyday objects such as clothes and furniture can be transformed into interactive surfaces".

At Google's annual conference I/O, Poupyrev showcased how the new technology works by allowing users to manipulate a 3D image on a screen based on how they touch the cloth.Google hasn’t revealed how it plans to implement the technology in our everyday lives, but it has disclosed that there will be a partnership with the popular denim brand Levi’s. You can can already imagine yourself in an apparently normal pair of jeans that allows to invisibly control media playback on your smartphone, silence an incoming call, adjust your home's smart lights, send messages, all without pulling out your phone, just by tapping and swiping on the fabric. You’d wear them, right?  And you might also want to match them with Google's talking shoes.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qObSFfdfe7I[/youtube] Source: Tech [post_title] => Google's Smart Interactive Clothing [post_excerpt] => Project Jacquard makes it possible to weave touch and gesture interactivity into any textile. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => googles-smart-interactive-clothing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-06-04 12:28:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-06-04 10:28:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=45190 [menu_order] => 633 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37158 [post_author] => 815 [post_date] => 2013-11-19 10:39:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-19 09:39:56 [post_content] => Really. According to United States Patent Application 20130297301, this is one of Google's latest ideas to make your smartphone even smaller and even more closely connected to you than you had ever imagined.If you read through the document far enough, you'll note that the tattoo isn't permanent, but rather an electronic tattoo on a flexible substrate on your throat. This device would then communicate remotely with your smartphone in a few revolutionary ways. The tattoo is, for instance, a nearly perfect microphone. It filters out almost all extraneous noise because it relies on vibrations in your throat (and adjacent vocal chords) to encode sound, making it incredibly useful in noisy, crowded situations like concerts, subway trains or almost anywhere outdoors. Google also envisions some less intuitive applications, such as including a user-interface and display on your throat, and applying these tattoos to animals and pets.They also mention that the tattoo could function as a lie detector, determining the behavior of the user by measuring the galvanic skin response. Would you wear your phone tattooed on your neck? If so, how much would you want it to tell others about you?Read more about this story at The Register. Photo via Geeky Tattoos. [post_title] => Google Wants to Tattoo a Phone Onto Your Throat [post_excerpt] => Google has just submitted a patent for lie-detecting throat tattoo that can also make calls. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => google-wants-to-tattoo-a-phone-onto-your-throat [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-11-19 10:39:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-11-19 09:39:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37158 [menu_order] => 1198 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 36688 [post_author] => 809 [post_date] => 2013-10-15 10:45:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-15 08:45:36 [post_content] => The development of touch technology has opened many possibilities of interaction with our electronic devices. Until now, you've had to physically touch the screen in order to interact with it. To solve this issue Tom Carter, PhD student at the University of Bristol’s Interaction and Graphics, designed UltraHaptics.This system creates haptic feedback in mid-air. It uses an array of 320 ultrasound speakers set behind a touchscreen to generate beams of high-frequency sound waves. Carter explains: “What you feel is a vibration. The ultrasound exerts a force on your skin, slightly displacing it. We then turn this on and off at a frequency suited to the receptors in your hand so that you feel the vibration a four hertz vibration feels like heavy raindrops on your hand. At around 125?Hz it feels like you are touching foam and at 250?Hz you get a strong buzz”.UltraHaptics offers a new kind of interaction, very different from those available at present, opening the way to new possibilities and conditions of use. Just think about the times you want to use your tablet or smartphone but you hands are dirty![youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QkbVr4J7CM[/youtube]Source New Scientist [post_title] => Use a Touchscreen Without Touching it [post_excerpt] => UltraHaptics is a system for creating haptic feedback in mid-air, offering new kind of interactions with our touchscreens. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => use-a-touchscreen-without-touching-it [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-10-15 10:45:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-10-15 08:45:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=36688 [menu_order] => 1240 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33045 [post_author] => 794 [post_date] => 2013-05-06 11:00:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-05-06 09:00:41 [post_content] => Samsung is introducing a new way of interacting with mobile devices. The world’s largest producer of mobile phones is experimenting with a mind-controlled tablet. Researchers at the Emerging Technology Lab are working with academics at the University of Texas in Dallas to develop the brain-control interface.The system uses an EEG-cap, which captures brain waves and translates them into different actions. The user is able to launch an app, select and pause a song, and call contacts. This hands-free form of interaction presents great opportunities for people with mobility impairments.Brain interfaces may be a more intuitive way of using electronic devices. Can you imagine calling a friend or checking your email without even touching your phone? This emerging technology is bringing the world of telepathy and telekinesis closer to reality.Story via Bright and Technology review. Picture via The Times. [post_title] => Control Your Mobile Phone or Tablet Directly from Your Brain [post_excerpt] => Samsung is working on a brain interface that lets you go truly hands-free with your phone. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => control-your-tablet-directly-from-your-brain [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-05-03 12:26:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-05-03 10:26:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=33045 [menu_order] => 1446 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27727 [post_author] => 601 [post_date] => 2012-11-03 22:48:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-11-03 21:48:04 [post_content] => Did you ever get annoyed about the same view you got by looking out of your window? Transferable windows will be the solution! Imagine you buy a special kind of window which you can place on your wall wherever you want, enabling you to get different views, not always looking at the same tree or house of your neighbors.Humans have been building houses for thousands of years, protecting themselves against the environment and for getting some form of privacy. Meanwhile, people don’t want to get the feeling being imprisoned and therefore they invented the window. But since windows can’t move, you always get the same view of the environment around you.The technology considering invisibility maybe could make it possible to make a piece of a wall invisible, creating a special kind of window. Invisibility and related things like an invisibility cloak have always been related to science fiction, not being considered natural or possible in reality. But technologies centering around invisibility have developed in a breathtaking pace and nowadays invisibility doesn’t seem to be impossible anymore. Scientists say an invisibility cloak is just the beginning and much more applications could become possible in the near future.Think of a window which you can place anywhere on your wall, enabling you to switch on invisibility and just look through that piece of wall which is covered by the window.Transferring windows and even making complete walls transparent has always been possible in the popular game “The Sims”. It looks like it won’t take long before this concept is transferred back to our real lives. You will be able to live in a “Sims House”, just put on the invisibility mode and transfer your window! [post_title] => Transfer Your Window! [post_excerpt] => Imagine you buy a special kind of window which you can place on your wall wherever you want, enabling you to get different views, not always looking at the same tree or house of your neighbors. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => transfer-your-window-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-11-03 22:48:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-11-03 21:48:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=27727 [menu_order] => 1649 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29215 [post_author] => 286 [post_date] => 2012-10-31 16:48:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-10-31 15:48:16 [post_content] => The One Laptop Per Child program is experimenting with what at first seems to be the lazy way to philanthropy: dropping off tablet computers in remote Ethiopian villages and then simply leaving. Could illiterate children learn not only how to operate the Motorola Zooms, but teach themselves to read? According to  Nicholas Negroponte, founder of One Laptop Per Child, the results were astonishing:“We left the boxes in the village. Closed. Taped shut. No instruction, no human being. I thought, the kids will play with the boxes! Within four minutes, one kid not only opened the box, but found the on/off switch. He’d never seen an on/off switch. He powered it up. Within five days, they were using 47 apps per child per day. Within two weeks, they were singing ABC songs [in English] in the village. And within five months, they had hacked Android. Some idiot in our organization or in the Media Lab had disabled the camera! And they figured out it had a camera, and they hacked Android.”Although further trials are needed, the initial results are electrifying. This drop-and-go approach could bring literacy, and all its benefits, to millions of children in remote, impoverished or unstable regions.The fact that the children were able to hack their computers – a skill that many of us will never even attempt, let alone master – speaks to the fact that they come from a culture that never left the DIY ethos behind. These kids are used to altering objects to suit their needs, rather than having a pre-made solution handed to them. An utterly alien piece of tech was no different from a natural material.The success of the program can also be attributed to the tablets themselves. Touch screens, gestural interfaces and symbols are more intuitive than keyboards and buttons. Rather than a gadget that changes us to fit its needs, tablet computers are "humane technology" that works with our natural ways of communicating and interacting with the world.Via Gizmodo. [post_title] => Illiterate Kids Learn to Hack Tablet Computers with No Outside Help [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => illiterate-kids-learn-to-hack-tablet-computers-with-no-outside-help [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-11-28 12:25:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2012-11-28 11:25:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=29215 [menu_order] => 1653 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 3 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24060 [post_author] => 328 [post_date] => 2012-09-10 23:09:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-10 21:09:56 [post_content] => [vimeo]http://vimeo.com/47656204#[/vimeo]In combining the classic feeling of handling a book with the interactivity of the computer, Waldek W?grzyn of the Academy of Fine Arts in Katowice, Poland, has created a new human-computer interface. His Electrolibraryproject connects the custom made book to a PC. Providing additional information, relevant to the page being viewed, on-screen. Turn a page in the book, and you "turn a page" on the website as well.Inspired by a.o. David Small's "Rethinking the book" (1999) and graphic designer El Lissitzky's "The topography of typography" (1923), the latter also inspiring the design of the book, W?grzyn has created a novel interface (pun intended) that he envisions could be used for an interactive children's book.Complete with touch sensitive curcuits made by screen printing conductive paint onto the pages the book presents a new method for communicating information interactively. [post_title] => Book as Human-Computer Interface [post_excerpt] => In combining the classic feeling of handling a book with the interactivity of the computer, Waldek W?grzyn of the Academy of Fine Arts in Katowice, Poland, has created a new human-computer interface. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => book-as-human-computer-interface [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-01-20 19:01:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-01-20 18:01:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=24060 [menu_order] => 1777 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 3 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78285 [post_author] => 1433 [post_date] => 2017-12-05 09:57:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-05 08:57:07 [post_content] => Conductive thread has been around for a while and it became the backbone of many smart textile creations, such as this one. Its versatility has been proven once again in a paper by a team of researchers from the University of Washington. They designed a smart fabric able to encode data readable by a magnetometer, like the one in your phone, without the need of electronics or batteries.Using the built-in magnetometer, magnetic textile can be used for gesture control. In 2014, iOS developer Ivo Leko already made a video on real-time magnet position detection by an iPhone. He suggested the development of virtual keyboards, by using gloves with magnets. Magnetic embroidery could be a very classy realization of this idea.Magnetized thread can be used for more than just smartphone applications. It is able to store data, by creating a binary code out of differing positive and negative polarity on the fabric. The same principle is implemented by creating a 2D image on a piece of conducting cloth. This can originate a code similar to a QR code, but it may also exist of letters forming a word. Multiple magnetometers put together create a “scanner” or “detector” capable of reading the invisible code embedded in the smart fabric. This could be used for authentication, for example to open a door.For the key-losers among us, embroidering the password to enter your house on your sleeve might be a clever idea. But don’t forget to stay away from magnets!Source: MIT Technology Review [post_title] => Smart Fabric Might Be the Key to the Future [post_excerpt] => Researchers designed a smart fabric able to encode data readable by a magnetometer, like the one in your phone, without electronics or batteries. 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