305 results for “virtual-for-real”

The new Next Nature book is here!

NextNature.net
May 28th 2019

? For pictures of the book launch, head to this page.

We live in a world in which we control the biology of a tomato at such precision, you could think of it as a product of technology, instead of a product of nature. Think about it, from genetics to breeding; a simple tomato isn’t remotely as simple as you might think. Technological advances allow our daily ingredients to be grown bigger, faster and better than ever before.

Conversely, in …

Three ways virtual reality is revolutionizing teaching

John Pickavance
May 14th 2019

You’ve probably heard how Virtual Reality (VR) is going to change everything: the way we work, the way we live, the way we play. Still, for every truly transformative technology, there are landfills of hoverboards, 3D televisions, Segways, and MiniDiscs – the technological scrap it turns out we didn’t need.

It’s reasonable to approach VR with a degree of scepticism, but allow me to explain three ways in which VR can transform the way we learn, and why we, as …

Next hospitals: How virtual reality is shaping the future of medicine

Jack Caulfield
September 12th 2018

And it’s already showing incredible results. VR transports us to faraway worlds without even asking us to leave our chairs. Yet we usually hear about it in the context of video games or the art world. Now, the world of healthcare is starting to wake up to the possibilities on offer. Here are some of the innovators who are tapping into the power of simulations to bring more humane and effective treatments to patients in need.…

The Dictionary of Online Behavior adds a virtual layer to your vocabulary

Ruben Baart
June 21st 2018

To some extent, it's a chicken-and-egg question: Are you unable to think about things you don't have words for, or do you lack words for them because you don't think about them? For digital natives, the online realms may become more familiar than aspects of the ‘real’ world - and that's where the Dictionary of Online Behavior comes in; a growing library for the avid social media user that you need to know to get by.…

Face the future of intimacy with Kiiroo

Ruben Baart
May 12th 2018

Meet the teledildonics, an ingenious species of bi-directionally controlled sextoys from the future, available today. These touch emulating vibrators find each other on social sex networks to, in accordance with the preferred embodiment, perform two-way interactive sessions that interface controls to the stimulation device(s) located at, well, your body. …

Interview: Jeremy Bailenson on his latest book “Experience on Demand”

Katherine Oktober Matthews
May 1st 2018

Virtual reality has come a long way. Like most technological leaps, it’s had a huge push from the entertainment industry, but current applications span a wide range of social and academic fields. Jeremy Bailenson, founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, has just released his new book, Experience on Demand. We briefly spoke with him about some of the most game-changing applications of this fascinating medium - as well as the risks.…

Researchers are using VR to help teachers understand autism

Rachel Kaser
April 19th 2018

Researchers are using VR as an empathy tool to help neurotypical teachers understand their students with autism. There have already been attempts to use VR to help autistic children and adults find new ways of coping. Autism Speaks, for example, funds a virtual reality training program designed to help improve social skills. But a team of researchers at the University of Malta decided to work on the problem from the other direction — namely, using VR to help teachers understand …

Digital islands: How this tiny country is embracing e-governance

Gudrun Jakups
April 9th 2018

Recent years have proved that if you want to look for which countries are adopting innovative digital governing solutions, you don’t look at the usual tech suspects like the US or Japan. You look to Estonia.…

Slowing down to start up: Here’s the first chapter of our crypto deep dive series

Koen Blezer
March 28th 2018

It takes years to design a new banknote, having hundreds of people working on every little detail, all done under the watchful eye of governments and professionals. However today, blockchain technology allows anyone to create and launch their own digital cryptocurrency in less than a minute with only a few clicks. What does this all mean? In this Deep Dive series, we take a closer look at some of these new coins, diving into the technology that underpins them, and …

Here’s what manufacturing enhanced with virtual reality will look like

Megan Ray Nichols
March 1st 2018

Robots are coming for our jobs. Virtual reality is coming to make the jobs that remain easier to accomplish.

All of the world’s manufacturing sectors are in the process of applying VR to the dizzying number of tasks required all up and down the supply chain — from handling raw materials to shipping goods off to end-users. Don’t be surprised if the future of manufacturing looks quite a bit different than it does today thanks to this up-and-coming — and quickly …

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? For pictures of the book launch, head to this page.

We live in a world in which we control the biology of a tomato at such precision, you could think of it as a product of technology, instead of a product of nature. Think about it, from genetics to breeding; a simple tomato isn’t remotely as simple as you might think. Technological advances allow our daily ingredients to be grown bigger, faster and better than ever before.

Conversely, in our world, technology (such as the internet or the financial markets) has grown so complex and omnipresent, though, that it’s developed a natural dynamism of its own, and we need to understand it better.

How natural is nature, really?

We seem to have entered a magical garden that may either take us by surprise and astonish us, or knock us down.

At Next Nature Network, it is our goal to share a richer understanding of nature, and strengthen the connections between the biosphere and the technosphere. We believe that our image of nature as static, balanced and harmonic is naive and up for reconsideration. Where technology and nature are traditionally seen as opposed, they now appear to merge or even trade places.

Nature, in the sense of trees, plants, animals, atoms, or climate, is getting increasingly controlled and governed by man. It has turned into some sort of cultural category. At the same time, products of culture, which we used to be in control of, tend to outgrow us more and more. These ‘natural powers’ shift to another field.

We must therefore aim to make sense of this world and invent a fitting vocabulary by which we can grasp the meaning of things, in order to ensure a liveable existence for the people who come after us by charting a path for the future that’s desirable for both humanity and for the planet as a whole.

We apply the term 'next nature' for this culturally emerged nature.

Forward to nature!

In Next Nature: How Technology Becomes Nature Koert van Mensvoort takes you on an epic exploration through the wonderful world of culturally emerged nature. It shows how the problematic disbalance between nature and technology not only obscures our current view on society, but simultanously hinders the future. The book offers a detailed read on the Next Nature philosophy, alongside timely examples and scientific insights.

Gradually, you'll find an entirely new worldview unfolding that is not only more realistic, but also infinitely creative, optimistic and humane. From wild software to genetic surprises, autonomous machinery and splendidly beautiful black flowers: Nature changes along with us!

Join us for the Dutch book launch on Tuesday 4 June at De Rode Hoed in Amsterdam. Pre-order your Dutch copy here. Note: We are currently working hard on the English translation of the book. Subscribe to our newsletter and we'll keep you in the know!

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You’ve probably heard how Virtual Reality (VR) is going to change everything: the way we work, the way we live, the way we play. Still, for every truly transformative technology, there are landfills of hoverboards, 3D televisions, Segways, and MiniDiscs – the technological scrap it turns out we didn’t need.

It’s reasonable to approach VR with a degree of scepticism, but allow me to explain three ways in which VR can transform the way we learn, and why we, as psychologists, are so excited about it.

1. Exploring the unexplorable

VR has great potential as a classroom aid. We know learning is more effective when learners are actively engaged. Practical lessons that encourage interaction are more successful than those where content is passively absorbed. However, certain topics are difficult to ground in meaningful tasks that learners relate to.

From the enormity of the universe to the cellular complexity of living organisms, our egocentric senses haven’t evolved to comprehend anything beyond the scale of ourselves. Through stereoscopic trickery and motion tracking, VR grounds counter-factual worlds in the plausible. For the first time, learners can step inside these environments and explore for themselves.

Researchers are currently developing Virtual Plant Cell, the first interactive VR experience that’s designed for use in the classroom. Learners explore the alien landscape of – well – a plant cell. Wading through swampy cytosol, ducking and weaving around cytoskeletal fibres, and uncovering the secrets of the plant’s subcellular treasures: emerald green chloroplasts, where photosynthesis takes place, curious blobs of mitochondria, or a glimpse of DNA through a sychedelic nuclear pore.

The inner workings of the cell are grounded, allowing students to actively engage with the lesson’s content through meaningful tasks. They may work in pairs to give each other tours, or create a photosynthetic production line. Using intuitive gestures, students grab carbon dioxide and water molecules from around the cell, feeding them to chloroplasts to produce glucose and oxygen. With all the ingredients for active learning, the Virtual Plant Cell should be a particularly effective teaching aid. Indeed, preliminary data suggests it may improve learning over traditional methods by 30%.

2. VR for everyone and everything

It’s not just the learning of “what” something is that VR can assist with, but also the learning of “how” to do something. In psychology, we make the distinction between declarative (what) and procedural (how) knowledge precisely because the latter is formed by doing and can be applied directly to a given task. Put simply, the best way to learn a skill is by doing it.

Every learner’s goal is to cultivate a large enough range of experience that individual elements can be drawn upon to meet the demands of novel problems. To this end, a great deal has been invested into training simulators for high-risk skills such as flying and surgery. But there are many lower-risk skills which would benefit from simulation, there’s just been little reason to justify investment. That is, until now.

Advancements in mobile technology have led to high-definition VR sets for the price of a mid-range TV. Without the financial barrier, consumer-grade VR opens the door to improve skills training in settings where the real thing isn’t readily available.

One such example would be the Virtual Landscapes programme we’ve developed at the University of Leeds. A vital part of any geologist’s training is to learn how to conduct geological surveys. Armed with a compass, GPS and a map, geologists must navigate unfamiliar terrain to make observations, ensuring they make the most of their time. VR simulation can provide this in real time, with all the tools they’d expect to have out in the field.

The advantages are twofold. Student absences from field trips become less of a hindrance with access to an accurate simulation. The challenges of surveying a mountainous region differ from those in a tropical rainforest. It may be easier to see where you’re going, but your choice of path will be more constrained. VR can present these different biomes without students having to visit all corners of the Earth. The learner’s experience is expanded, and they’re better equipped to tackle novel problems in the field.

3. Wearing (a VR headset) is caring

VR may also hold the key to driving positive behavioural changes. One way we know we can achieve this is by eliciting empathy. VR uniquely allows people to experience alternative perspectives, even being dubbed the ultimate “empathy machine”. It’s a lofty claim, but early applications have shown promise.

A recent Stanford study showed that participants who experienced becoming homeless in VR displayed more positive behaviour towards homeless people – in this case, through signing a petition demanding solutions to the housing crisis – than those who engaged with the same materials on a traditional desktop computer. This effect persisted long after the study ended. Perhaps by experiencing firsthand the challenges faced by vulnerable groups, we can share a common understanding.

The power of VR to elicit empathy might be used to tackle an even wider range of social issues. We’ve been running VR outreach projects in schools to improve awareness around climate change. Through VR, young people have witnessed the melting of the icecaps, swam in the Great Barrier Reef to see the effects of receding coral on the ecosystem and rubbed shoulders with great primates whose habitats are being cleared by deforestation. Using VR, we hope to cultivate environmentally responsible behaviour before attitudes and habits become more fixed.

So there you have it. By bringing previously inaccessible experiences into the classroom, VR may accelerate the learning of abstract concepts, augment the acquisition of skills, and perhaps even be a force for social change. For now, the technological scrap heap can wait.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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And it’s already showing incredible results. VR transports us to faraway worlds without even asking us to leave our chairs. Yet we usually hear about it in the context of video games or the art world. Now, the world of healthcare is starting to wake up to the possibilities on offer. Here are some of the innovators who are tapping into the power of simulations to bring more humane and effective treatments to patients in need.

Virtual Therapy

At the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, therapeutic treatment is starting to look a little different. Brennan Spiegel, director of research for the hospital, is bringing VR to the patients.

Spiegel leads a team of researchers whose job is to develop ways to make medical use of virtual reality. The team have been trying out a variety of different techniques in therapeutics, and they say they’re excited with the results.

A VR environment designed to distract patients from their pain was found to be just as effective as the opioids which would usually be prescribed. Spiegel compares the technique to yoga and mindfulness meditation. Patients were even able to deal with pain more effectively after the treatment, not only during it. Is it possible to reach Zen in a virtual world, and then bring this mindset back with you?

VR also helped teach patients healthier lifestyle habits. A surreal VR program transports patients with high blood pressure to a virtual kitchen, where they are educated on which foods should be avoided to reduce sodium intake. Then they travel inside a human body, to see the effects of sodium from within.

After that, who wouldn’t be convinced to eat healthier meals?

The team also creates more specific environments to suit individual patients’ needs. One patient with Crohn’s disease was restricted to the hospital for a long period. When he told doctors that he found his grandmother’s living room to be a uniquely calm, healing environment, they had the solution. The team used a 360-degree camera to capture the appearance of this room, and transport the patient to it through VR.

Spiegel says that the young man was so comforted by this experience that he was brought close to tears.

Digital Surgery

But it’s not only patients who gain benefits from VR. Shafi Ahmed, from startup Medical Realities, wants to put virtual and augmented reality to use in the education of aspiring surgeons.

It won’t be the first time surgery has been given the VR treatment. But where previous surgical VR experiences were deliberately ridiculous games, Medical Realities intends to use the technology as a serious training tool.

Ahmed has worked with various options for spreading knowledge of surgical techniques. In 2014, he used Google Glass to stream a surgical training session to 14,000 surgeons around the world. In 2016, he livestreamed an actual instance of cancer surgery in VR, and used Snapchat glasses to record an operation in short clips and broadcast it to a huge global audience.

Now, the innovator is working with a VR company called Thrive, to create a virtual doctors’ office in which doctors from different locations can come together via VR to discuss patients and prognoses. The office even includes virtual copies of the relevant patient files.

A spirit of openness guides all Ahmed’s innovations. He says he is motivated by the fact that there is an enormous need for more surgeons in the world today. His solution? “I want to share knowledge with the masses.” VR presents the opportunity for long-distance learning, consultation, and – as headsets become more and more accessible – a miraculously wide reach.

Cybermedicine?

These are just a couple of examples of the way VR is currently reshaping medicine across the world. But we write about the present to imagine how the future might look. The humane technologies of VR seem set to continue expanding and innovating. It falls to us to imagine all the potential uses to which they could be put.

How will a visit to the doctor look in a few years’ time? Instead of driving to the clinic, you might simply put on your headset and meet your digital doctor. You might be able to practice healthy lifestyle choices in a virtual environment to train yourself for reality. You could relieve the boredom of a long hospital stay with adventures in VR.

[post_title] => Next hospitals: How virtual reality is shaping the future of medicine [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => next-hospitals-how-virtual-reality-is-shaping-the-future-of-medicine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 12:59:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 11:59:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91110 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 82061 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2018-06-21 19:34:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-21 18:34:56 [post_content] => To some extent, it's a chicken-and-egg question: Are you unable to think about things you don't have words for, or do you lack words for them because you don't think about them? For digital natives, the online realms may become more familiar than aspects of the ‘real’ world - and that's where the Dictionary of Online Behavior comes in; a growing library for the avid social media user that you need to know to get by.The Dictionary "offers new tools to reflect upon online reality," says TeYosh, the artist duo behind the project. "At this point, we still know the dual meaning of a friend and differentiate online friends from the ones we shook hands with," they explain."The ephemeral words in the DoOB describe a moment in history when the online relationships are still not a norm." But then again, you could ask yourself; how often do you read a message without opening it? Or, how do you even determine whether you're going out with that Tinder match before looking up their Instagram account?All too painful, yet all too real, The DoOB reflects upon the reality in which we are all living in right now, "[it's] a view from the perspective of the last generation that had a chance to grow up in the offline world and got the know the online world as something new, something other."Introducing a world's first on Nextnature.net: A visual interview - because sometimes, a picture says so much more than words.

How does the dictionary of online behavior relate to traditional dictionaries?

What's the response been like?

Have you seen people taking new approaches to deal with language ever since you launched the website?

Do you have a recent favorite piece of technology, virtual or physical, that helps achieve the language you're promoting?

What do you make of the lingual rituals we perform today? (LOL, ICYMI, WTF - and other acronyms)

Does our intuitive understanding of new language rely on analogies to old ones?

Are we witnessing the beginning of the end of written language?

Will good writing become a niche specialty? And does this standardization of simple ‘language’ have a role in representing our actual society and reality?

What’s your favorite thing to do on the Internet?

What kind of gadgets do you use?

How would you describe the way that you think about the Internet?

What's wrong with the way we think or talk about the Internet? (if applicable)

What do you want from social media?

Finish the sentence: The Internet needs new

_____________________The Dictionary of Online Behavior is a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication. Do you want to take part in the visual interview series? Join NNN and let us know! [post_title] => The Dictionary of Online Behavior adds a virtual layer to your vocabulary [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dictionary-of-online-behavior [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-29 10:57:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-29 09:57:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=82061 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81441 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2018-05-12 12:16:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-12 11:16:42 [post_content] => Meet the teledildonics, an ingenious species of bi-directionally controlled sextoys from the future, available today. These touch emulating vibrators find each other on social sex networks to, in accordance with the preferred embodiment, perform two-way interactive sessions that interface controls to the stimulation device(s) located at, well, your body.Tuning into our current research on how technology radically alters our attitude towards reproduction, gender, relationships and love in the 21st century, we caught up with the team from Amsterdam-based teledildonic manufacturer Kiiroo to learn more about modern dating, tactile sensations, and the future of long distance love. Because nothing says “I love you” like teledildonics.
"Intimacy is something that is constantly evolving"
The term ‘teledildonic’ stems from the mid-70s, and made a public entrance in the late 80s, to become the promise of 90s cybersex. Yet today, teledildonics still remain in a niche. It seems that the world is still not ready for this sexual revolution. However with the current trend of exponential technology, I wonder: How will exponential technology change our relationship with sex?Change is a powerful word. We will not change our current relationship with sex, but rather enhance it. Intimacy is something that is constantly evolving. People find new things that interest them in the bedroom, and when distance separates couples, people get creative with how they keep the spark alive.We went from phone sex, to Skype sex, and now the use of teledildonics to mimic sex, and we have even come so far as to have sex in 3D/VR in real time.Nothing will ever replace the power of emotion that you feel when you are with your loved one, but technology will definitely enhance those feelings and generate excitement.Early sexual, yet political technology (read: anti conception) disconnected sex from reproduction. New technology seems to disconnect intimacy from sex. How does the Kiiroo product contribute to a new societal perspective on recreational sex with technology?Kiiroo initially created the “Kiiroo Couple Set” in 2013/2014 to help bring couples who were in long-distance relationships closer together. As a company, we know that nothing will ever replace real intimacy, and the feeling of being with your significant other, but we created the closest possible form of intimacy that you can have through the Internet.Now, a few years later, our devices and technology are being used for an array of recreational activities. Webcam performers use interactive devices in live webcam performances, getting tipped by customers sends tips to the devices to make them vibrate or stroke in real time corresponding to tip amounts. We have interactive erotic content in 2D and VR that syncs seamlessly to all of our devices.
"We went from phone sex, to Skype sex, and now the use of teledildonics to mimic sex"
How does Kiiroo see the relationship between sex and technology? And how has this relationship changed over time, and how will it change in the future?We see the relationship between sex and technology as constantly evolving. Technology will never replace real intimacy, but it is opening the doors for self-expression, comfort and exploration in the bedroom and also promoting safer sex at the same time. We can learn a lot through technology, and technology will always be an accompaniment rather than a replacement.Technology holds the potential to facilitate intimate, yet emotional experiences from a distance. One way to put it, is that Kiiroo is facilitating such intimate encounters. How does technology add to our understanding of intersubjective relationships?Technology enables us to explore and connect with each other to a greater degree than before. It creates a platform or a safe space where we are able to interact with each other to a different degree than we were previously able to. Communication is experienced differently once there is touch involved from a distance; you get to communicate in ways you never thought you could. Thus, maintaining a closer bond with each other. You are also able to explore fantasy lands together where you are subjected to an array of choices to your liking in a safe and comfortable space.Also, as we have become more of a world that tends to live lives online, we find more comfort in learning about a person before actually being with them.Then how do tactile (technological) sensations play a role in governing our sexual activities?Being touched is one of the most personal intimate experiences someone can have. Combined with other senses, touch can be a very powerful experience leading to some powerful emotions and reactions. Multiple stimuli need to be stimulated in order to amplify sensations; touch, visual, audio - if you combine them the sensations become more real and powerful than if you just have one.If you think about smell for instance; smelling certain things can trigger certain emotions. Like when you smell a perfume that your ex-boyfriend used to wear, this triggers emotions – whether happy, sad, angry etc. Technology like the Kiiroo devices can do this too, it triggers those feelings that you couldn’t feel from your partner without them actually being in the same space.
"Sex toys are opening up the doors to new ways of experiencing sex"
How does modern dating influence new sexualities?Technology makes it easier to find likeminded people, who may have the same sexual preference as you, the same fetishes, the same beliefs and more. Forums, groups, etc. create same places for people to find likeminded others. It’s the same for interactive sex toys; people use Reddit, Craigslist and more to find other teledildonic toy users.Sex toys are opening up the doors to new ways of experiencing sex. You can have sex before you meet, with different people before meeting for the first time. Technology allows people to meet for the first time in a safe space.If for instance, you live in Australia, and your partner lives in London, the time difference is huge. Your partner in London can record an interactive session and you can play it in your time zone and your partner can play it in theirs. We’re blurring the boundaries.VR livestream in a new and exciting setting is very intimate too. You can decide how the room looks and influence all kinds of things that will make this experience closer and more intimate while your partner(s) are 1000kms away.Modern dating’s influence on new sexualities to sum up - we feel that technology is allowing us to explore who we are in such detail that it gives us the self-freedom to become who we needed to become, not who society told us to be, not how society told us to be, but who we are.
"Technology will enhance feelings of emotion and generate excitement"
In a world heavily filtered through screens, we start to experience intimacy (and touch, for that matter) as a virtual experience as well. Even relationships and love are becoming virtual practice. Are we striving for relationships in a not-so-relational world?The answer to this can be two-fold. we don’t think everyone will have a similar stance on technology in a long-standing relationship, and technology to forge new relationships.On one hand, we have technology that is aiding relationships that have been separated for one reason or another, to help them keep the spark alive for that period of time that they are apart. On the other hand, we have relationships that start through the Internet and transpire to become something more and more concrete or fizzle out at a point.We have become an Internet connected society, we are constantly on our phones, on the Internet and constantly watching our screens, it was inevitable that technology would creep its way into our bedrooms.We have become this society that spends more of our lives on Facebook or Instagram where we have found a space of belonging in a not so relational world. But we have to look at it in the eyes of someone who is not me or you, perhaps someone that has been isolated due to disease or disability or work, not everyone has found a sense of belonging in the world, so it’s only natural that we turn to technology to create a safe space or a comfortable space for ourselves in a world that may not be our own, but it is the world where we can be ourselves.
"It was inevitable that technology would creep its way into our bedrooms"
Teledildonics hold the psychopharmacological possibility of “de-gendering” the human brain using technology (considering gender is a construct). How do you relate to a post-gender world and how can teledildonics highlight the breadth and variety of human gender, sex, and sexuality?With VR for instance, you can be a gender that is not your own; you can see a woman or man’s body and experience how it is to see your body as a different sex. Combining it with devices you can enhance that experience. It will be possible to experience new adventures. VR games are even more de-gendered, you chose the person you want to be.The same goes with the devices, some (not all) can be used by multiple genders, for multiple reasons to stimulate different areas of the body and can connect to an array of interactive content that spans across an array of sexual preferences.How do you relate to the concept of objectification (using technology) in terms of human connectedness?Technology by definition objectifies as we do refer to technology as an object, it’s something we use not something we (not everyone) are connected to. If you as a person are not there, but there is a representation of you, I may not see you as real. But, if you are interacting with me and we form a connection through technology, there is ample room to form a connection.Modern sex toys seem to have evolved towards slick, high-end design (household) objects. What’s the main challenge of teledildonic design today?The entire industry is becoming more sex positive and more aware of the things we put in and around our body. High-end designs that may look like a speaker etc. are mainly for reasons of discretion at home. As sex and the use of sex toys is still quite a taboo topic in many households, we have found the more discreet, compact and travel friendly a device is, the more people will consider buying it. Some designs are so big and bulky that it deters people from even considering buying it.Materials also play a huge part in the design of high-end devices; medical grade silicone, biodegradable materials, body safe materials all need to be considered when creating new devices.
"If you stay ahead of the game, the undesirable futures can be avoided"
Linking to undesirable futures of new sex toys that are vulnerable to hackers, what would be undesirable for this teledildonic future? (even if it is commercially exploitable?)Over the last few years we have seen a number of teledildonic toys get hacked, and companies have had major issues with data being retrieved and more.As a company, it is vital to keep privacy and security as the utmost importance in order to avoid what we may consider undesirable futures.The most undesirable future would probably be being hacked, but that is why we work with a Bug Bounty Program and Hacker1 to ensure that our systems and devices are not vulnerable to negative external hacking.If you stay ahead of the game, the undesirable futures can be avoided.Does me using Kiiroo devices make me a cyborg?Haha definitely not. The definition of cyborg is “a fictional or hypothetical person whose physical abilities are extended beyond normal human limitations by mechanical elements built into the body.” Our devices are not implanted into the body. [post_title] => Face the future of intimacy with Kiiroo [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => teledildonics-kiiroo [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-05-17 17:50:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-05-17 16:50:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81441 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81327 [post_author] => 1604 [post_date] => 2018-05-01 10:00:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-01 09:00:38 [post_content] => Virtual reality has come a long way. Like most technological leaps, it’s had a huge push from the entertainment industry, but current applications span a wide range of social and academic fields. Jeremy Bailenson, founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, has just released his new book, Experience on Demand. We briefly spoke with him about some of the most game-changing applications of this fascinating medium - as well as the risks.
"For twenty years I’ve been running experiments on people to see how the mind responds"
The subtitle of your book Experience on Demand is about what virtual reality can do – do to us or for us?The subtitle says it all: “What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do”. My PhD is in psychology, and what I study is how technology affects the mind. For twenty years I’ve been running experiments on people to see how the mind responds and, more recently, building applications that leverage that which makes virtual reality such a special medium.What is it that makes it so special?It’s hard to talk about virtual reality; you have to do it. When it’s done well, it’s complete mental transportation. You’ve gone somewhere else, and it’s consuming and it’s spectacular and it’s a different type of experience. The second I tried it, and really thought about if this is what I could do for a living twenty years ago, I went all in.Think about virtual reality as an experience. You’re not doing a media activity; the brain tends to treat it in a similar way as an actual experience. You’ve got this magic machine that creates these experiences as if you were to go outside and actually do something, so it’s pretty spectacular to think we can artificially reproduce any experience imaginable.You remain an optimist about the technology?The book has now been reviewed by The New York Times, Nature, The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal. The critics feel I need to be more doom-and-gloom and should hate Silicon Valley a bit more. And I do hear that critique, but it’s my true hope that I can, in some small way, shape what people do and how they think about the medium to ensure a more positive outcome.My job is to ensure that the good use cases emerge and not the gratuitous ones. When Stanford students come into my office with an idea—they’ve all got start-up ideas, because we’re in Silicon Valley—probably nineteen out of twenty times, we decide it’s better to use another medium than virtual reality. So, I’m an extremely cautious advocate.
"My job is to ensure that the good use cases of VR emerge and not the gratuitous ones"
What are some of those good use cases?We do a lot of work on climate change. Can you imagine, not in your head, but to viscerally experience what your city is going to look like when flooding and droughts and more extreme storms happen? We do work on reducing prejudice, so imagine walking a mile in someone else’s shoes – literally. You look down and you become a different skin color or become a different gender, and you experience prejudice first hand.We do lots of work where you can do the impossible, where you can create experiences that the brain treats as real but are very difficult to achieve in the real world. We then ask: how can you use that to change the way people behave, or the way they conserve resources, or the way they treat other people?And what about the risks?Despite the critiques of the media, Chapter 2 is all about the downsides. Things like becoming addicted to these experiences that are always perfect, or becoming a little simulator-sick or nauseous because you’ve been in there for too long, or most poignantly, walking into walls or stepping on cats. We had a first death unfortunately in virtual reality: a man in Moscow was so distracted he fell through a plate-glass table and he bled to death. So there are real risks.How can we circumvent those risks?That is the critical question, and I’ll talk about when I come and deliver this address.You’ve been studying VR since the late ‘90s. How has it evolved and where are we now?When I first started doing research, we thought of virtual reality as being similar to an MRI machine: very expensive, takes up a whole room and you need to have a dedicated engineer to run it. A bit later, if you look at my lab webpage and if you look at our scientific journal articles, probably three-quarters of them were using a pair of goggles that cost more than an automobile. Currently, the goggles cost as much as a fancy dinner at a restaurant. So, we’ve gone through an epic change of price.Also, because of the big tech companies, we’ve got a lot of availability. Conservatively, in the United States, there are over ten million VR systems floating around. From a citizen’s standpoint, I want to understand the good and bad use cases, but as a scientist, it’s great. I can now run experiments where we’ve got larger sample sizes and field studies where people are now using them in their homes. This has transformed the way we think about studying the medium.
"The really great use cases of VR aren’t just games, it’s for creating life experiences that improve us"
To conclude, what do you wish that everyone knew about VR that they may not know?I’m always stunned that people don’t know that the epic wins are really not about games or entertainment. They’re about making yourself better, whether that’s training or evaluating yourself and others. The really great use cases aren’t just games, it’s for creating life experiences that improve us.[caption id="attachment_81334" align="alignnone" width="421"] Bailenson's book "Experience on Demand: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do" is out now.[/caption]Jeremy Bailenson will be speaking at the John Adams Institute on April 24, 2018, 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm, at Pakhuis de Zwijger in Amsterdam. Cover photo: L.A. Cicero via Stanford News [post_title] => Interview: Jeremy Bailenson on his latest book "Experience on Demand" [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interview-jeremy-bailenson [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-25 12:47:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-25 11:47:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81327 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81389 [post_author] => 1609 [post_date] => 2018-04-19 11:45:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-19 10:45:05 [post_content] => Researchers are using VR as an empathy tool to help neurotypical teachers understand their students with autism. There have already been attempts to use VR to help autistic children and adults find new ways of coping. Autism Speaks, for example, funds a virtual reality training program designed to help improve social skills. But a team of researchers at the University of Malta decided to work on the problem from the other direction — namely, using VR to help teachers understand the lived experience of autistic children.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsH6CmZK2A4[/youtube]The researchers created a VR application that would help replicate the experience of an autistic child in their classroom, by the use of audio and visual tricks. The person from whose perspective the film is shot sometimes doesn’t fully process stimuli, and a sense of distress is conveyed by a blurring of peripheral vision.Dr. Vanessa Camilleri, a lecturer at the University’s Department of Artificial Intelligence who worked on the app, spoke with us about the project and its goals:"Let’s help the teacher walk in these children’s shoes, in the same classroom environment that she’s teaching in, and try to see what comes out of it. Can virtual reality be an empathy machine? How can we learn more from it to design something that can help improve the quality of life of others? Because ultimately that’s what we wanted to do: improve the quality of life of children by helping teachers tweak their behavior."The idea of using virtual reality as a vehicle for empathy has been around a while. For example, filmmaker Chris Milk created Clouds Over Sidra, a VR film showing life in a Syrian refugee camp, in collaboration with the United Nations.The researchers’ app isn’t yet available for use, but the team wants to make it available to teachers via the Samsung Gear headset.Dr. Camilleri stressed that the project can’t replicate every aspect of an autistic child’s experience — there are olfactory and tactile sensitivities that VR can’t (yet) replicate. She also specified that the app would be more for helping teachers understand their students, rather than training them on how to help autistic children:"We didn’t want to teach about the different characteristics or show the whole spectrum of autism. We didn’t want to give teachers step-by-step guidelines of what they should or shouldn’t do. We just want to help teachers start creating these new experiences in their minds, as if they were children on the autism spectrum."Dr. Camilleri said that the team hopes to eventually make different versions of the app for parents or family members.This story is published in partnership with The Next Web. Read the original piece here. [post_title] => Researchers are using VR to help teachers understand autism [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => using-vr-to-understand-autism [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-24 07:53:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-24 06:53:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81389 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81216 [post_author] => 1599 [post_date] => 2018-04-09 10:03:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-09 09:03:33 [post_content] => Recent years have proved that if you want to look for which countries are adopting innovative digital governing solutions, you don’t look at the usual tech suspects like the US or Japan. You look to Estonia.Estonia, being a country of approximately 1,3 million people has in recent years really set the agenda for how you govern a country digitally. Their ideas within e-governance, digital policies, and national cryptocurrencies have created headlines all over the world and shifted the lens of the media to pay close attention to what is buzzing in this small state in the Baltics.Estonia has also caught the interest of its fellow small state neighbors. One of them is the Faroe Islands, a tiny Nordic country with 50,000 inhabitants, which is now embarking on a similar journey as Estonia. Their goal is to create a fully-fledged digital infrastructure by 2020.

From the land of maybe to the land of tomorrow

“We are currently experiencing a wave of good times in the Faroes. The most notable example is that our economy is doing well, unemployment is low, and our population is growing. These are times we need to seize, and the best way to do so is to make sure our country properly enters the digital age.”These are the words spoken by Kristina Háfoss, minister of finance in the Faroe Islands. She is head of the ministry that runs the project Digital Faroe Islands, and she has big ambitions for what this project can do for a country of only 50,000 people. She explains it like this:"The technicalities of this project are novel and innovative on its own, but it’s just as much the symbolic part of a project like this that is important. With this project, we are creating a digital infrastructure in the Faroe Islands."The role of infrastructure is huge in the Faroe Islands. In pre-industrialized times — when by foot, rowboat, or horse was the main way to get around on the rugged country — the weather played an important role in whether you could make it from A to B. And in the Faroes, the weather is rarely playing in your favor. Due to this instability, the answer to whether you could show up for appointments would often be “maybe” and hence, a local nickname for the Faroes is “the land of maybe.”The country’s physical infrastructure has changed significantly for the better, but the “maybe” mentality still prevails. Kristina Háfoss believes that by implementing a thorough digital infrastructure, the country will no longer be the land of maybe, but the land of tomorrow.For many years, the Faroe Islands have struggled with a declining population. Especially young, educated people have not been returning to the country, after having sought education abroad. This pattern is already changing, and Kristina Háfoss believes that the project Digital Faroe Islands will only reinforce that pattern.“Ultimately it will secure more jobs in a field of work that a lot of people are educated for, and strengthen our competitiveness,” she explains, “it will simply make our country more attractive and secure it better for the future.”

Building a digital infrastructure

Nicolai Mohr Balle is the head of the project Digital Faroe Islands. He explains that the idea of how to design the Faroese digital infrastructure is heavily inspired by the Estonians.The infrastructure is built on four main pillars; the service portal, the digital identity, the interoperability system X-road and the basic digital registries.Nicolai Balle sums the experience up like this:"What seems most basic is the service portal, from which you can handle your public administration. You can take care of everything from there. Banking, doctor’s appointments, applications for rodent extermination, buying a house, or applying for university. Everything is accessible through the same portal with the digital identity."What makes it especially effortless, Nicolai Balle explains, is the fact that the citizen won’t have to enter his or her information for every different appointment or application he or she has to make. Once you’re signed in, the system takes care of providing your details.This sounds effortless, if not a bit precarious. But Nicolai Balle assures me that the exchange of personal data on this platform is entirely safe and decentralized. The service portal is run on the interoperability system, X-road, which is an Estonian invention. The X-road is basically a data platform, which links individual servers through end-to-end encrypted pathways. This assures that the information always remains local.The X-road was a platform built for the Estonian government, but since its invention, other countries have also adopted it. Among them is the Faroe Islands, but also Finland, Namibia, and Azerbaijan. When the X-road is used in many different countries, this also creates opportunities for accessing services internationally.The digital identity is used as your digital signature. The ID will comprise of a username and a password that you have to enter and verify with your private key, which is placed on an app on your phone. This solution is compliant with the EU eIDAS regulation on electronic identification. This means that over time, the local Faroese digital identity can also be used to access services from other EU countries.“For example,” Nicolai Balle explains, “if my son wants to apply for university in Finland, he can sign in to the university portal there, using the local digital identity that he uses for dealing with his public administration here in the Faroes.”

The future for small countries is digital

The former president of Estonia, Toomas Hendrik Ilves, has been quoted to tell a story of a book he once read about how computerization would be the death of work. The book used an example from the American steel mill industry, where automatization had made thousands of former workers redundant and only left a few hundred workers left.The writer of the book might have thought it painted a picture of a drab future, but Ilves immediately saw that computerization could mean the beginning for small countries to fully maximize their potential.Ilves has since publicly urged other countries to follow Estonia’s example and make the digital shift.Nicolai Balle wholeheartedly agrees with Ilves. “Digitalization is of crucial importance for a small country. Especially a country like ours, that boasts itself of having a welfare society – that type of welfare society only remains relevant if we keep it modern at the same time.”Kristina Háfoss also sees huge potential in digitalization for small countries."You know it’s easier to turn a speedboat around than a supertanker, and this is the strategy and driving force for making the Faroe Islands a role-model in e-governance. In a small society, things are simpler. In the legal framework, in government and in general.Just the fact that we have fewer systems by being small creates much less legal work and our ability to leapfrog to new solutions. That’s why I believe the Faroe Islands can become world class competitors on e-governance, and a truly digitized society, providing us with competiveness in an ever-increasing globalized world."Being a small country can manifest itself in a lot of anxiety and lack of self-esteem. But it seems like digitalization and e-governing are proving to be the rock which David uses to beat Goliath. Estonia is already running in the front. Now let’s see if the Faroe Islands can run next to them. The ambitions are certainly there.This story is published in partnership with The Next Web. Read the original piece here. [post_title] => Digital islands: How this tiny country is embracing e-governance [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => digital-faroe-islands [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-17 11:38:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-17 10:38:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81216 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81165 [post_author] => 1593 [post_date] => 2018-03-28 17:37:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-28 16:37:46 [post_content] => It takes years to design a new banknote, having hundreds of people working on every little detail, all done under the watchful eye of governments and professionals. However today, blockchain technology allows anyone to create and launch their own digital cryptocurrency in less than a minute with only a few clicks. What does this all mean? In this Deep Dive series, we take a closer look at some of these new coins, diving into the technology that underpins them, and explore what this may mean for the future of money.

Economy is ecology

We are living in a world of accelerating change: Ecologies are being put to waste while new ones are being formed at any given moment, anywhere in the world. This extreme throughput of ecologies is surely also the case in our financial world. As soon as a new ecology emerges (like the sharing economy), the financial world rushes in to create an economy for it.Such a market is made from trade and conversions between shares, stocks or equities: whatever product is needed to plug it into our complex economic process. But the rules of this process remain unclear. They surely differ from the strict programming rules behind an app or website in the way that, even though we can create these markets, we never know how they will behave or what their value will be in the future. It’s an ecology of itself, something worth studying in order to learn from its behaviour.With the ECO Coin, we are aiming to create an ecological economy: an economy that is directly connected to the global, ecological sphere. To do so, we make use of cryptocurrency- and blockchain technology, and in this story, we will introduce you to the dynamics and systems that continuously feed the development of this ecological economy platform we’re currently building.Cryptocurrencies are constantly 'moving'; either up, down or sideways. And millions of dollars are flying across blockchains, faster than the speed of light. As a result, shares are being dropped for this hot new investment alternative, and money is lost in this process - hitting the people hardest who are struggling to see the cryptocurrency market for what it is: highly speculative.To that end, it is right to assume that a ‘cryptocurrency trader’ is one of the new jobs of the future, perhaps it’s as normal as being a stock trader is today.

Have you seen the latest thing in the cryptocurrency world?

No you probably haven’t. CoinMarketCap (an industry-standard listing service for cryptocurrencies) has added 58 new cryptos in the past 28 days. That’s 2 per day!By the time you are reading this, chances are that 10 new ICO’s (Initial Coin Offerings) have been launched and five crypto companies have gone bankrupt.But there are also currencies and platforms that choose a different direction. They function more like incentive structures for ‘good’ behaviour. In these, the token (a word used synonymously with the words cryptocurrency and coin) doesn’t necessarily hold any economic value, but more so signifies certain wanted behaviour, like ecological behavior.When such a platform goes bust, it’s simply a failed iteration on how to digitise socially responsible behaviour.Users and speculators often regard these incentive-based coins as being ‘the new Bitcoin’, and see dollar signs when they start using them. This is something specific to the cryptocurrency market: if there’s liquidity (which in this case directly assumes socially responsible behaviour) then there must surely be something backing that coin, and it’s a solid reason to invest.The gold standard backed our financial system in the past. But we’re long past that now. The crypto avant-garde roaming the web right now is eagerly searching for the next, big asset-backed coin that they can invest into. Whether its backed by something or not.

A token for everything

While there are a lot of great use cases out there in crypto-land, it’s hard to see the actual implementation of these in day-to-day life. Cryptographic tokens can resemble voting ballots, discounts or even bought products. But as of yet, there are no tokens yet that are as normal as paying with good ol' paper money.Moving beyond blockchain technology, programmers have recently tried to crack a use case for the IOTA token (a token that will supposedly empower the Internet-of-Things revolution), but didn't succeed to find one. This shows us that a lot of conceptually valuable tokens are not being used for anything yet. At current, the IOTA token is still unusable: a speculative coin that is being bought with the assumption that its value will rise over time.Perhaps it's good that cryptocurrencies have not penetrated everything yet, this gives us some time to reflect upon its cause. The cryptocurrency world is only 10 years young and we shouldn’t just throw away thousands of years of economic history.

A new financial elite

Currently there's a pool of young (and rich) programmers that now make up the new financial elite, because this group bought into Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies very early on in the process.You could say that this new financial elite is one of our Next Natures: A new financial elite, or the crypto investors and programmers that make up most of this sector, create autonomous systems as a way of providing sustenance (income) to themselves. Instead of dialing into existing structures, they continually create new ones and find a place within that new framework.An important distinction, of course, being that they are not in control of these systems but merely the architects of them, where in the traditional financial world, the ‘quants’ or architects do have the possibility to significantly control the networks they manage, because they program within the same network. That is why cryptocurrencies are ‘moving’ so fast now.

Crypto markets: What’s the silver lining?

Blockchain is still on a level where my grandfather is unable to pay for anything with crypto, and 'day-traders' who are investing in cryptocurrencies are losing money on a daily basis.In fact, only a small percentage of them are able to make a living off of their bets, but are far removed from how the act of trading in stocks and exchanges has developed in the ‘regular’ financial world.In case you are interested in cryptocurrencies after reading this article, but are also confused by the sheer speed of its development, then there’s only a few things that you need to do: invest as little as you can, don’t be afraid of losing it, take it easy, approach markets safely and most important of all: sit back and watch.Crypto will be around long enough for you to pick the fruits of its development. So until then, learn as much as you can, do your own research and talk to as many different people as possible.The technology behind any cryptocurrency (the blockchain) is revolutionary. It can literally connect citizens together as a people, regardless of nationality, social class or political inclination. That is beautiful dream that ECO Coin is happy to keep alive and a dream we will be talking about a lot in the coming months.Perhaps what the world of cryptocurrency needs is to pick up a slower pace. This gives us some time to reflect upon its past 10 years, and think about what's possible in the next 100 years. [post_title] => Slowing down to start up: Here's the first chapter of our crypto deep dive series [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => deep-dive-series-speed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-17 11:38:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-17 10:38:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81165 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 80592 [post_author] => 872 [post_date] => 2018-03-01 10:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-01 09:00:22 [post_content] => Robots are coming for our jobs. Virtual reality is coming to make the jobs that remain easier to accomplish.All of the world’s manufacturing sectors are in the process of applying VR to the dizzying number of tasks required all up and down the supply chain — from handling raw materials to shipping goods off to end-users. Don’t be surprised if the future of manufacturing looks quite a bit different than it does today thanks to this up-and-coming — and quickly maturing — technology.

Inventory Management

If you’ve never worked in a warehouse before, it might be difficult to imagine how useful virtual reality could be for the “picking” of orders. In shipment facilities, for example, several products may be gathered at once to be shipped together in the same container. In a FedEx or DHL facility, picking involves choosing the correct shipment from many, at the right time, and seeing it on toward the next part of the chain of custody.The previous version of this paradigm required “pickers” to juggle handheld RFID or barcode scanners, sometimes while operating heavy machinery or dollies simultaneously. Virtual reality delivers the most important task-related information while keeping our hands unencumbered. Amazon.com and the U.S. Postal Service are already frighteningly efficient at what they do — virtual reality should boost their productivity and accuracy even further.

Training

Many of the global industries which still rely on physical labor in a major way are in the midst of a labor shortage. Simply put, we have a lot of semi-skilled positions available and not enough semi-skilled persons to fill them. The fact that college becomes more prohibitively expensive each year isn’t helping things. Amazingly, VR may soon play a central role in the employee training and onboarding processes.New hires can receive more tailored, relevant and, most importantly, workflow-friendly training prompts as they learn the ropes. This type of immersive learning is frequently credited with better recall later on, so imagine the potential when VR delivers not dry classroom learning, but instead context- and graphics-rich training materials right when you need them most. It might even preside over a kind of renaissance in on-site “apprenticeship-style” training, where learning is put to use immediately and with the benefit of real-world context.

Maintenance

General Electric paired with software company Upskill recently to demonstrate the benefits VR can bring to general maintenance. It’s a timely example, too: they proved that wind turbine workers could deliver productivity improvements of nearly 35 percent with assistance from VR. This is compared with the benchmark of “traditional” and VR-less turbine wiring techniques.For wind turbine technicians, this is less a “maintenance” application and more a “day-to-day” type of thing. Nevertheless, the concept readily applies to a great deal of the duplicable, repetitive and frequently necessary upkeep tasks needed by modern machinery and facilities of all kinds.

Floor Plan Optimization

Building a brand-new facility from scratch or designing upgrades for an existing structure are both difficult and time-intensive tasks you don’t want to get wrong the first time around. Whether you need to choose locations for stationary manufacturing or material handling equipment or you just need to come up with a more natural workflow for your employees, virtual reality is here to help you out.Interior decorators have allowed consumers to play with top-down views of their homes to digitally arrange dining room tables and loveseats for some time now. It lets us, as it were, adjust the “digital Feng Shui” of our homes and workplaces before plunking down the cash on new furnishings. Virtual reality will take this concept to its logical next step.Imagine manipulating equipment and furniture not in two dimensions, but in three. Picture yourself walking through a totally virtual wireframe representation of what your new building could look like. Imagine how much easier the trial and error if it all could be with VR giving us a new pair of eyes.As you can see, there likely isn’t a single part of the manufacturing process that won’t be touched in some way by the advent of more mature virtual reality technology. That’s a step forward we can all get behind._________________________Looking for more stories? Join NNN and we will keep you in the know on everything next nature, all around the world! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Here’s what manufacturing enhanced with virtual reality will look like [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virtual-manufacturing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-08 18:34:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-08 17:34:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=80592 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 111422 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2019-05-28 18:56:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-28 17:56:55 [post_content] =>

? For pictures of the book launch, head to this page.

We live in a world in which we control the biology of a tomato at such precision, you could think of it as a product of technology, instead of a product of nature. Think about it, from genetics to breeding; a simple tomato isn’t remotely as simple as you might think. Technological advances allow our daily ingredients to be grown bigger, faster and better than ever before.

Conversely, in our world, technology (such as the internet or the financial markets) has grown so complex and omnipresent, though, that it’s developed a natural dynamism of its own, and we need to understand it better.

How natural is nature, really?

We seem to have entered a magical garden that may either take us by surprise and astonish us, or knock us down.

At Next Nature Network, it is our goal to share a richer understanding of nature, and strengthen the connections between the biosphere and the technosphere. We believe that our image of nature as static, balanced and harmonic is naive and up for reconsideration. Where technology and nature are traditionally seen as opposed, they now appear to merge or even trade places.

Nature, in the sense of trees, plants, animals, atoms, or climate, is getting increasingly controlled and governed by man. It has turned into some sort of cultural category. At the same time, products of culture, which we used to be in control of, tend to outgrow us more and more. These ‘natural powers’ shift to another field.

We must therefore aim to make sense of this world and invent a fitting vocabulary by which we can grasp the meaning of things, in order to ensure a liveable existence for the people who come after us by charting a path for the future that’s desirable for both humanity and for the planet as a whole.

We apply the term 'next nature' for this culturally emerged nature.

Forward to nature!

In Next Nature: How Technology Becomes Nature Koert van Mensvoort takes you on an epic exploration through the wonderful world of culturally emerged nature. It shows how the problematic disbalance between nature and technology not only obscures our current view on society, but simultanously hinders the future. The book offers a detailed read on the Next Nature philosophy, alongside timely examples and scientific insights.

Gradually, you'll find an entirely new worldview unfolding that is not only more realistic, but also infinitely creative, optimistic and humane. From wild software to genetic surprises, autonomous machinery and splendidly beautiful black flowers: Nature changes along with us!

Join us for the Dutch book launch on Tuesday 4 June at De Rode Hoed in Amsterdam. Pre-order your Dutch copy here. Note: We are currently working hard on the English translation of the book. Subscribe to our newsletter and we'll keep you in the know!

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