16 results for “Wetware”

Chrysler Looks to Human Lungs for a Better Gas Tank

Jonathon Markowski
November 24th 2013
Alveoli in human lungs serve as the inspiration for designing better, stronger ways of storing compressed natural gas.

Is the Human Body Redundant?

Rachel Armstrong
March 24th 2012

The increasing ‘liveliness’ of machines and accessibility to the virtual world has raised questions about whether it is possible to uncouple the mind from the body in through a host of different strategies. The basic idea is that if we are able to escape the ties of our own flesh then we can upgrade them and even replace them with immortal ones. Performance artist Stelarc has made some of the most extreme and enduring work on this subject. The artist characteristically …

How to Grow an Organ

Van Mensvoort
January 24th 2010

Buckle up for the state of the art in the fusion of the made & the born. Anthony Atala of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine presented footage of his bio-engineers growing human organs at TEDMED – from muscles to blood vessels to bladders, and more.  Thanks Michèle.…

3D Bioprinter promises tissue on demand

Van Mensvoort
January 18th 2010

Behold "the world's first production model 3D bio-printer." A machine capable of arranging human cells and artificial scaffolds into complex three-dimensional structures, which result in such wonderful things as printed design meat, replacement organ tissue, or perhaps artificially grown teeth.

"Scientists and engineers can use the 3D bio printers to enable placing cells of almost any type into a desired pattern in 3D," says Keith Murphy, CEO of Organovo – the San Diego based company who will supply the devices …

Ear on your arm? Why not?!

ewes
October 18th 2009


For over 40 years Australian artist Stelios Arcadious Stelarc has made art with medical instruments, prosthetics, robots, virtual reality systems and biotechnology to investigate alternate, intimate and involuntary interfaces with the body. In one of the interviews he says: The assumption being that if the body was altered it might mean adjusting its awareness.

His 'Ear on the Arm' piece is a full sized ear constructed of the living cells permanently placed under the skin of Stelarc’s forearm – a …

Craig Venter – Catalyst of evolution

Van Mensvoort
October 10th 2009

If the six hour crash course on synthetic genomics is a bit too much for you, there is always a more snappy TED lecture in which Craig Venter ponders on whether we can create new life out of our digital universe. Needles to ask what his answer is.

Dr. Venter now has a database now with about 20 million genes and thinks of them as the design components of the future. In little over half an hour the audience is …

Reprogramming Skin Cells into Stem Cells

Arnoud van den Heuvel
July 28th 2009

A major breakthrough in the world of genetics: Researchers have successfully reprogrammed skin cells into stem cells. Using a technique called iPS cell reprogramming (developed in Japan 2006) they were able to modify skin cells from mice and grow embryos:

"The mice seem to have a high death rate, with some dying after just two days, and others displaying physical abnormalities, details of which the team would not reveal. But some of their mice passed one of the most fundamental …

The Next Hacking Frontier: Your Brain

Dr Natural
July 12th 2009

WiredScience writes: Hackers who commandeer your computer are bad enough. Now scientists worry that someday, they’ll try to take over your brain.

In the past year, researchers have developed technology that makes it possible to use thoughts to operate a computer, maneuver a wheelchair or even use Twitter — all without lifting a finger. But as neural devices become more complicated — and go wireless — some scientists say the risks of “brain hacking” should be taken seriously.…

Wetware [definition]

Arnoud van den Heuvel
June 3rd 2009


Though its exact definition has shifted over time, the term "wetware" and its fundamental reference to "the physical mind" has been around from the mid-1950s. In its original, intended meaning, wetware is the underlying generative code for an organism, as found in the genetic material, in the biochemistry of the cells and in the architecture of the body’s tissues. It is further used to describe the embodiment of the concepts of the physical construct known as the central nervous system …

Liberate the Breast Cancer Genes

Arnoud van den Heuvel
May 16th 2009

On May 12, 2009 the ACLU and the (not-for-profit) Public Patent Foundation, filed a lawsuit, charging that patents on two human genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer are unconstitutional and invalid. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of four scientific organizations representing more than 150,000 geneticists, pathologists, and laboratory professionals, as well as individual researchers, breast cancer and women's health groups, genetic counselors and individual women.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) has granted thousands of patents on …

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Hardware - software - wetware (the brain) [parent] => 0 [count] => 16 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 146 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (150) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37183 [post_author] => 815 [post_date] => 2013-11-24 11:01:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-24 10:01:31 [post_content] => Compressed Natural Gas  (CNG) has one major benefit over traditional gasoline – it's cheap. About 1/3 of the cost, to be exact. Unfortunately, it also has to be kept under very high pressure, which means that traditional gas tanks simply can't stand up to it. Until now, the only way to store CNG fuel has been in reinforced plain geometric cylinders. Used for their strength, they also take up valuable space and weigh quite a lot. Chrysler is trying to find a better way, using human lungs as inspiration. Enrico Pisino, Chrysler's senior manager of innovation, explains that human lungs store oxygen in numerous small sacs called alveoli, and that his researchers are using this method to design new, stronger storage tanks.Story via Ciprian Florea at Autoevolution.com. Image via The Courier. [post_title] => Chrysler Looks to Human Lungs for a Better Gas Tank [post_excerpt] => Alveoli in human lungs serve as the inspiration for designing better, stronger ways of storing compressed natural gas. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chrysler-looks-to-human-lungs-for-a-better-gas-tank [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:07:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:07:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=37183 [menu_order] => 1193 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 21302 [post_author] => 271 [post_date] => 2012-03-24 12:00:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-24 11:00:43 [post_content] => The increasing ‘liveliness’ of machines and accessibility to the virtual world has raised questions about whether it is possible to uncouple the mind from the body in through a host of different strategies. The basic idea is that if we are able to escape the ties of our own flesh then we can upgrade them and even replace them with immortal ones. Performance artist Stelarc has made some of the most extreme and enduring work on this subject. The artist characteristically depersonalises his anatomy and claims that it is not only an object that can be subjected to re-designing but is also ‘obsolete’. During his performances, Stelarc mentally ‘vacates’ his own body to prove its obsolescence, and claims that his body is no more than a site for redesigning and re-engineering the human form.In my view, Stelarc’s work paradoxically highlights the profound importance that embodiment holds for being human. When Stelarc dissociates his mind from his body he demonstrates its sheer plasticity and robustness. The artist then recolonizes the body with robots, communications technologies and soft prostheses as proof of this inbuilt physical redundancy. Yet the machines he hosts are given context by the presence of a body – for in its absence, they are just a collection of machines devoid of meaning. Moreover, redundancy is a characteristic of complex systems, which are a form of organization that does not obey the Cartesian, dualistic laws that govern machines. The artist’s rejection of these qualities simply highlights that the human body is not a machine.There is nothing liberating about having an anesthetized body, nor one that is functionally redundant. While Stelarc’s suspensions and performances demonstrate that we can temporarily ‘forget’ our bodies in order to explore a transcendent state of being, there are those who live in a permanent state of disconnection.My interest in design and the human body began as a medical student during a visit to Anandgram (Village of Joy) leprosy hospital and rehabilitation center on the outskirts of Poona, India. I was assisting a surgeon to re-thread tendons in patients with critical loss of hand function. By attaching the healthy muscles of less important tendons, such as those in the fingers, to restore actions in more important ones, such as the thumb, important complex actions such as grip could be restored. These operations were performed in a simple sterile room without general anesthetic, because the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus had a devastating preference for nerve tissue, which led to paralysis of movement and sensory loss. In other words, the areas of the body affected by leprosy were insensitive to the pain of surgical incisions. This made for strange polite conversation with a fully awake patient, while assisting the surgeon perform complex surgery, in what was little more than a bare room.Yet through this simple approach my colleague was able to help many patients, without the normal cost associated with employing an anesthetist for complex, deep and sometimes lengthy surgery. It was also possible to see just how effective the rearrangement of the patient’s anatomy would be by asking them to move their hand during the procedure. These visceral, restorative procedures were not confined to hand function but could be applied to other important muscle groups. One vital operation involved splitting a face muscle tendon and attaching it to the inside of the eye. This enabled people who had lost the ability to blink to be able to voluntarily do so by clenching their teeth. With intensive training, eye drops and rehabilitation, those who had undergone the procedure were able to consciously protect their eyes from drying and ultimately save themselves from blindness.There was much work to be done since M. leprae prefers to infect nerves and soft tissues, starting at the extremities and working its way towards the body. Although the infection was treatable in its early stages, once the disease had set in it caused irreversible nerve damage and extensive tissue destruction, resulting in the physical ‘stigma’ of leprosy*. My colleague used his surgical skill and experience to re-site hand and facial tendons correctly, with the active cooperation of his patients, both within the realm of the operating theater and without. The Anandgram community created a supportive environment and provided active, intensive physiotherapy and much encouragement for residents to learn how to use, and to continue to use, their re-wired bodies. Following these interventions, some residents returned to employment by customizing the operating interfaces and altering their mechanical advantage industrial machines to suit specific impairments that could not be restored by surgery, such as loss of a limb **.Despite their strange disfigurements and odd rearrangements, residents learned how to use their re-wired bodies again. Although I had been party to remarkably mechanistic interventions such as rethreading tendons and re-stitching them in unnatural places, it was clear to me that the simple re-wiring alone had neither affected nor restored each person’s physical integrity. From the moment the patient left the operating theater, their re-located tendon insertions tugged on their muscle groups, which sent signals to the brain that the entire body had been immersed in a novel reality. Each resident would have to work hard to re-tune their mind and body into a synchronous existence to restore and establish networks of interactions that spanned the physiological, anatomical, cognitive, social and environmental realms.By focusing on their bodies, the residents of Anandgram became physically and socially reintegrated, and were able to re-create their being in the world. This amazing ability is something that all of us are able to do, such as when we train to increase our fitness, or start to recover from a debilitating illness, and is what makes us all truly unique. Our anatomy enables us to be who we are, no matter what that form may be, and allows us to possess qualities that machines do not have such as flexibility, robustness, the ability to renew or regenerate and the capacity to deal with ‘the unknown’. Of course, there are limits to our physical potential and instinctively, we want to push ourselves to our full potential, exceed it, or, like Stelarc, temporarily resist ‘being in’ our bodies. This is not a healthy space to inhabit for any prolonged period – indeed, it is a kind of death. Next nature views the human body as a powerful connector, that empowers and enables us to enjoy a many kinds of experiences and ways of being that do not separate mind and matter but embrace them as a seamless whole.*The physical ‘stigma’ of leprosy such as depigmented skin patches, loss of digits, chronic ulcers, ‘lion-like’ facial deformity and blindness are only part of the affliction. People who contract the infection are also subject to psychological and social traumas, which compound difficulties and prevent people from seeking treatment early.**This video that I made in 1992 explores the difference between inhabitants of Poona that enjoyed a normal life and compares it with those with leprosy. Some are begging in the streets, while others are receiving treatment at the Anandgram leprosy hospital, or employed in specially designed workshops in the community. [post_title] => Is the Human Body Redundant? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => is-the-human-body-redundant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:20:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:20:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=21302 [menu_order] => 1934 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5373 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2010-01-24 21:23:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-01-24 20:23:34 [post_content] => [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQP3HrU8fdM[/youtube]Buckle up for the state of the art in the fusion of the made & the born. Anthony Atala of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine presented footage of his bio-engineers growing human organs at TEDMED – from muscles to blood vessels to bladders, and more.  Thanks Michèle. [post_title] => How to Grow an Organ [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-grow-an-organ [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:28:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:28:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=5373 [menu_order] => 2664 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5245 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2010-01-18 22:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-01-18 21:37:25 [post_content] => Behold "the world's first production model 3D bio-printer." A machine capable of arranging human cells and artificial scaffolds into complex three-dimensional structures, which result in such wonderful things as printed design meat, replacement organ tissue, or perhaps artificially grown teeth."Scientists and engineers can use the 3D bio printers to enable placing cells of almost any type into a desired pattern in 3D," says Keith Murphy, CEO of Organovo – the San Diego based company who will supply the devices institutions investigating human tissue repair and organ replacement."Researchers can place liver cells on a preformed scaffold, support kidney cells with a co-printed scaffold, or form adjacent layers of epithelial and stromal soft tissue that grow into a mature tooth. Ultimately the idea would be for surgeons to have tissue on demand for various uses, and the best way to do that is get a number of bio-printers into the hands of researchers and give them the ability to make three dimensional tissues on demand."Building human organs cell-by-cell was considered science fiction not that long ago, but now rapidly becomes science faction. Yet another step in the blending of the 'made' and the 'born'.Via: Livescience.com. [post_title] => 3D Bioprinter promises tissue on demand [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3d-bioprinter-promises-tisue-on-demand [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:28:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:28:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=5245 [menu_order] => 2668 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4084 [post_author] => 225 [post_date] => 2009-10-18 20:10:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-10-18 19:10:11 [post_content] => im_stelarc__530.jpg For over 40 years Australian artist Stelios Arcadious Stelarc has made art with medical instruments, prosthetics, robots, virtual reality systems and biotechnology to investigate alternate, intimate and involuntary interfaces with the body. In one of the interviews he says: The assumption being that if the body was altered it might mean adjusting its awareness. His 'Ear on the Arm' piece is a full sized ear constructed of the living cells permanently placed under the skin of Stelarc’s forearm – a clear homage to the famous tissue engineered ear mouse. The microphone and sound transmitter were supposed to be inserted inside his body within the ear shaped scaffold. This ended up to be not feasible yet due to infections that electronics caused.The vision behind the project was to generate an alternative electronically enhanced organ to better interact and operate within the World. At the same time it provokes a debate about a desire to redesign and alternate human’s body evolutionary structure.Stelarc points out: Now we can engineer additional and external organs to better function in the technological and media terrain we now inhabit. All very well, allthough it's perhaps a better strategy to redesign our technological environment so that it fits our existing human physique.Related: Phone Tooth, USB finger, High Heels, How biotech will drive our evolution, Homo desktopus, Humans are the sex organs of technology. [post_title] => Ear on your arm? Why not?! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ear-on-your-arm-why-not [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:34:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:34:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=4084 [menu_order] => 2744 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4002 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2009-10-10 20:08:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-10-10 19:08:37 [post_content] => [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKZ-GjSaqgo[/youtube]If the six hour crash course on synthetic genomics is a bit too much for you, there is always a more snappy TED lecture in which Craig Venter ponders on whether we can create new life out of our digital universe. Needles to ask what his answer is.Dr. Venter now has a database now with about 20 million genes and thinks of them as the design components of the future. In little over half an hour the audience is walked through the latest endevours in synthetic genomics.His talk covers topics like: How to boot up a chromosome. How he plans to replace the petrochemical energy with bacteria that turn CO2 into energy. How to take security measures. Why people who think of evolution as just one gene changing at the time have missed much of biology. And why it is a mistake to think they are trying to create life from scratch, as they are merely playin on one of the key principles of nature: all life derives from other life.Nature changes along with us and it is changing fast. Buckle up for a catalyst of evolution.Related: Build a better being, DNA Synthesizer, Top 10 new organisms, Mapping the DNA world, Google DNA, Poetry of Genetics, Crash course on synthetic genomics, How biotech will drive our evolution, Human genetic DNA sequencing soon child play?. [post_title] => Craig Venter – Catalyst of evolution [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => craig-venter-%e2%80%93-catalyst-of-evolution [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-01-12 11:35:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-12 10:35:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=4002 [menu_order] => 2750 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3748 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-07-28 14:09:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-07-28 13:09:11 [post_content] => skincells stemcells embryosA major breakthrough in the world of genetics: Researchers have successfully reprogrammed skin cells into stem cells. Using a technique called iPS cell reprogramming (developed in Japan 2006) they were able to modify skin cells from mice and grow embryos:"The mice seem to have a high death rate, with some dying after just two days, and others displaying physical abnormalities, details of which the team would not reveal. But some of their mice passed one of the most fundamental tests of health: all 12 mice that were mated produced offspring, and the offspring showed no abnormalities. The team says it now has hundreds of second-generation, and more than 100 third-generation, mice."iPS mouse"Unlike embryonic stem cells, iPS cells can be generated without the destruction of a human embryo and thus circumvent the ethical issues that have mired much of stem cell research. While iPS cells have been shown to be capable of developing into many different cell types, they had not been shown to be equal to embryonic stem cells -- until today."  It was 1993 that Spielberg directed Jurassic Park in which he envisioned the possibility of reviving the dinosaur through cell-cloning. Less than twenty years later science gives the beginning of an answer. It will probably take another twenty years to even speak of reviving the dodo or mammoth, but the way things are looking now; in the Next Nature life will be programming itself.Via: technologyreview.com | see also: nature.com | whitehead.mit.edu | image credits: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research & Nature | Related: Green Glowing Monkeys | Forefather Ox Cloned to Revive Delicious Steak [post_title] => Reprogramming Skin Cells into Stem Cells [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => reprogramming-skin-cells-into-stem-cells [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-07-28 14:26:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-07-28 13:26:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3748 [menu_order] => 2815 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3681 [post_author] => 20 [post_date] => 2009-07-12 09:28:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-07-12 08:28:53 [post_content] => WiredScience writes: Hackers who commandeer your computer are bad enough. Now scientists worry that someday, they’ll try to take over your brain.In the past year, researchers have developed technology that makes it possible to use thoughts to operate a computer, maneuver a wheelchair or even use Twitter — all without lifting a finger. But as neural devices become more complicated — and go wireless — some scientists say the risks of “brain hacking” should be taken seriously.“Neural devices are innovating at an extremely rapid rate and hold tremendous promise for the future” said computer security expert Tadayoshi Kohno of the University of Washington. “But if we don’t start paying attention to security, we’re worried that we might find ourselves in five or 10 years saying we’ve made a big mistake”.Hackers tap into personal computers all the time — but what would happen if they focused their nefarious energy on neural devices, such as the deep-brain stimulators currently used to treat Parkinson’s and depression, or electrode systems for controlling prosthetic limbs?According to Kohno and his colleagues, who published their concerns July 1 in Neurosurgical Focus, most current devices carry few security risks. But as neural engineering becomes more complex and more widespread, the potential for security breaches will mushroom.For example, the next generation of implantable devices to control prosthetic limbs will likely include wireless controls that allow physicians to remotely adjust settings on the machine. If neural engineers don’t build in security features such as encryption and access control, an attacker could hijack the device and take over the robotic limb.“It’s very hard to design complex systems that don’t have bugs” Kohno said. “As these medical devices start to become more and more complicated, it gets easier and easier for people to overlook a bug that could become a very serious risk. It might border on science fiction today, but so did going to the moon 50 years ago.”Some might question why anyone would want to hack into someone else’s brain, but the researchers say there’s a precedent for using computers to cause neurological harm. In November 2007 and March 2008, malicious programmers vandalized epilepsy support websites by putting up flashing animations, which caused seizures in some photo-sensitive patients.“It happened on two separate occasions” said computer science graduate student Tamara Denning, a co-author on the paper. “It’s evidence that people will be malicious and try to compromise peoples’ health using computers, especially if neural devices become more widespread”.In some cases, patients might even want to hack into their own neural device. Unlike devices to control prosthetic limbs, which still use wires, many deep brain stimulators already rely on wireless signals. Hacking into these devices could enable patients to “self-prescribe” elevated moods or pain relief by increasing the activity of the brain’s reward centers.Despite the risks, Kohno said, most new devices aren’t created with security in mind. Neural engineers carefully consider the safety and reliability of new equipment, and neuroethicists focus on whether a new device fits ethical guidelines.But until now, few groups have considered how neural devices might be hijacked to perform unintended actions. This is the first time an academic paper has addressed the topic of “neurosecurity,” a term the group coined to describe their field.“The security and privacy issues somehow seem to slip by” Kohno said. “I would not be surprised if most people working in this space have never thought about security”.Kevin Otto, a bioengineer who studies brain-machine interfaces at Purdue Universty, said he was initially skeptical of the research. “When I first picked up the paper, I don’t know if I agreed that it was an issue. But the paper gives a very compelling argument that this is important, and that this is the time to have neural engineers collaborate with security developers”.It’s never too early to start thinking about security issues, said neural engineer Justin Williams of the University of Wisconsin, who was not involved in the research. But he stressed that the kinds of devices available today are not susceptible to attack, and that fear of future risks shouldn’t impede progress in the field. “These kinds of security issues have to proceed in lockstep with the technology,” Williams said.History provides plenty of examples of why it’s important to think about security before it becomes a problem, Kohno said. Perhaps the best example is the internet, which was originally conceived as a research project and didn’t take security into account.“Because the internet was not originally designed with security in mind” the researchers wrote. “it is incredibly challenging — if not impossible — to retrofit the existing internet infrastructure to meet all of today’s security goals”.Kohno and his colleagues hope to avoid such problems in the neural device world, by getting the community to discuss potential security problems before they become a reality.“The first thing is to ask ourselves is, ‘Could there be a security and privacy problem?" Kohno said. “Asking ‘Is there a problem?’ gets you 90 percent there, and that’s the most important thing”.Source: Wired science. Via: Mindhacks. [post_title] => The Next Hacking Frontier: Your Brain [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-next-hacking-frontier-your-brain [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-11-27 14:19:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-27 13:19:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3681 [menu_order] => 2837 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3535 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-06-03 12:00:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-06-03 11:00:46 [post_content] => wetware Though its exact definition has shifted over time, the term "wetware" and its fundamental reference to "the physical mind" has been around from the mid-1950s. In its original, intended meaning, wetware is the underlying generative code for an organism, as found in the genetic material, in the biochemistry of the cells and in the architecture of the body’s tissues. It is further used to describe the embodiment of the concepts of the physical construct known as the central nervous system (CNS) and the mental construct known as the human mind. Wetware is a two-part abstraction drawn from the computer-related idea of hardware or software.Many posts on NextNature could have been tagged wetware, and because technology seems to be shifting from "production" to "growing", I think it is a term we will be tagging quite often from now on.via: vastal.eu | see also: wikipedia.org [post_title] => Wetware [definition] [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wetware-definition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-08-22 11:53:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-08-22 10:53:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3535 [menu_order] => 2869 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3443 [post_author] => 251 [post_date] => 2009-05-16 14:37:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-05-16 13:37:31 [post_content] => breast cancerOn May 12, 2009 the ACLU and the (not-for-profit) Public Patent Foundation, filed a lawsuit, charging that patents on two human genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer are unconstitutional and invalid. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of four scientific organizations representing more than 150,000 geneticists, pathologists, and laboratory professionals, as well as individual researchers, breast cancer and women's health groups, genetic counselors and individual women.The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) has granted thousands of patents on human genes – in fact, about 20 percent of our genes are patented. A gene patent holder has the right to prevent anyone from studying, testing or even looking at a gene. As a result, scientific research and genetic testing has been delayed, limited or even shut down due to concerns about gene patents."Patenting human genes is counter to common sense, patent law and the Constitution," said Daniel B. Ravicher, Executive Director of PUBPAT and co-counsel in the lawsuit. "Genes are identified, not invented, and patenting genetic sequences is like patenting blood, air or e=mc2."[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h6X46-qz14[/youtube]Two specific genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2 play a big role in preventing breast and ovarian cancers. Normally, these genes act like brakes that help stop abnormal cell growth. However, alterations or mutations can occur in these BRCA genes. When this happens, the genes do not work as they should, and there is a loss of control on cell growth. Certain groups of cells can grow at an abnormally fast rate, and cancer may develop.brcaVia boingboing | see also: aclu.org | Related: DNA Synthesizer | Google DNA Search | DNA as Information Storage | Chromosome 11 Flyover | Biopresence - Human DNA Trees [post_title] => Liberate the Breast Cancer Genes [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => liberate-the-breast-cancer-genes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2009-12-21 21:01:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2009-12-21 20:01:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=3443 [menu_order] => 2892 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 37183 [post_author] => 815 [post_date] => 2013-11-24 11:01:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-24 10:01:31 [post_content] => Compressed Natural Gas  (CNG) has one major benefit over traditional gasoline – it's cheap. About 1/3 of the cost, to be exact. Unfortunately, it also has to be kept under very high pressure, which means that traditional gas tanks simply can't stand up to it. Until now, the only way to store CNG fuel has been in reinforced plain geometric cylinders. Used for their strength, they also take up valuable space and weigh quite a lot. Chrysler is trying to find a better way, using human lungs as inspiration. Enrico Pisino, Chrysler's senior manager of innovation, explains that human lungs store oxygen in numerous small sacs called alveoli, and that his researchers are using this method to design new, stronger storage tanks.Story via Ciprian Florea at Autoevolution.com. Image via The Courier. [post_title] => Chrysler Looks to Human Lungs for a Better Gas Tank [post_excerpt] => Alveoli in human lungs serve as the inspiration for designing better, stronger ways of storing compressed natural gas. 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