25 results for “What’s Flying There?”

Drones Protect Indonesia from Volcanic Danger

Jack Caulfield
January 11th 2018
In Bali, volcanic danger looms large. Scientists are trying to use drones to forestall the danger and make the invisible workings of the volcano visible.

Drones Are Coloring Your Summer

NextNature.net
July 10th 2017
Looking for a summer book? Wherever your vacation takes you, our drones coloring book What’s Flying There? should be on your holiday packing list!

Rescue Drone Will Save You in Open Water

Elle Zhan Wei
April 20th 2017
Drone made to rescue in bad weather condition in open waters.

The Self-Flying Taxi Drone

Ruben Baart
February 18th 2017
Passenger-carrying drones will hit the skies in Dubai this summer.

Robo-Bee Pollinated a Japanese Lily

Nadine Roestenburg
February 16th 2017

A video of a robotic bee pollinating a flower (looking more like Loopin' Louie spinning off the board game and hitting a flower) recently caught our attention. What at first sight might look like a silly viral video, could be an important step in the survival of bees. To save us humans from a future without honey and pollinating crops by hand, we need to save the bees. These insect-sized drones could actually play a major role in their survival.…

“Hello, Robot” Expo at Vitra Design Museum

NextNature.net
February 9th 2017
Pyramid of Technology poster and What’s Flying There? coloring book at "Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine" exhibition.

Drone Hits Crash Test Dummy for Your Safety

Ruben Baart
February 6th 2017
Researchers at Virginia Tech are studying the risk of injury from a drone collision by hitting a crash test dummy in the head.

Cyborg Dragonfly for Special Service

Ruben Baart
January 30th 2017
A Biomedical solutions company is developing a system for insects to wear, allowing engineers to steer it remotely.

The Selfie Drone

Ruben Baart
January 17th 2017
Can a drone take selfies?

What’s Flying There? Flip Through

NextNature.net
December 30th 2016
Listen to the What's Flying There? story read by NNN Ambassador Tracy Metz.
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Warning signs: reading the land to predict the future

Mount Agung, the highest point on Bali and a currently active volcano, poses a huge potential danger to the island's inhabitants. But although major seismic activity is underway, volcanoes are unpredictable, and it's always difficult to tell what will happen next.This is where drone company AeroTerrascan came in. Their high-flying drones have been helping in several different ways. Firstly, the drones were sent up to thoroughly scan the volcano from all angles. The data gathered, tracking Agung's shape and size to 20 cm of accuracy, was used to create a detailed 3D map. It's important to have this kind of map because growth in the size of a volcano is a clear indicator of danger. Now scientists can assess future danger by comparing the volcano current size against the map.For their second mission, a brave little drone was sent to fly right over the volcano. This drone was fitted with sensors to detect carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. High levels of these gases indicate an imminent eruption. In this case, unfortunately, the data gathered was bad news, and the government raised Agung's warning level even higher.Which brings us to the drones next proposed task: scanning Agung's surroundings not for geological data, but for people. When evacuation is necessary, it can be difficult to tell if everyone has gotten the message and escaped. When the time comes, these drones could patrol for anyone who might have been left behind.

Beneath the surface: a deeper understanding of invisible processes

These tasks aren't risk-free. Several drones have been lost navigating the 3000 km vertical climb to Agung's peak. Yet if it can save lives, the risk is clearly worth it. And besides this immediate benefit, using drones in this way is part of something bigger. New technologies are allowing us to make typically inscrutable, chaotic elements of nature, phenomena we have lived with for millennia, more comprehensible.Many people fear that technology disconnects us from nature. But in cases like this, at least, it's clear that the opposite is true. We are learning to read the obscure geological signals being sent out by the most violent and unpredictable parts of our world. And doing so not only provides practical benefits, but in the long-run gives us a deeper understanding of our environment.Perhaps it's another example of "making the invisible visible". If what once seemed like the whims of wrathful nature becomes ever more understandable to us, how does our relationship with the planet change? Technological applications like this could be the key to allowing us to treat the Earth like an old familiar friend, rather than a dangerous enemy.Source: Treehugger [post_title] => Drones Protect Indonesia from Volcanic Danger [post_excerpt] => In Bali, volcanic danger looms large. Scientists are trying to use drones to forestall the danger and make the invisible workings of the volcano visible. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => drones-protect-indonesia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-11 10:31:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-11 09:31:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79857/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 76218 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-07-10 10:00:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-10 08:00:25 [post_content] => What’s flying there? Is it a bird? No wait, it’s a drone! School holidays have begun and our drones coloring book What’s Flying There? might be the perfect travel companion for your summer. In this book, drones are more than just a military device or pizza delivery guy. While coloring, the main character Avi and her drone friends will take you on a journey to open up new perspectives on the controversial topic of drones applications in the human habitat. Wherever your vacation takes you, What’s Flying There? should be on your holiday packing list!Become a NNN member and receive a copy for free! [post_title] => Drones Are Coloring Your Summer [post_excerpt] => Looking for a summer book? Wherever your vacation takes you, our drones coloring book What’s Flying There? should be on your holiday packing list! [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => summer-book-drones-coloring-book [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-10 18:31:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-10 16:31:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=76218/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 73156 [post_author] => 1324 [post_date] => 2017-04-20 16:00:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-20 14:00:28 [post_content] => Drones are versatile in their capabilities, they expand possibilities and increase efficiency on tasks that could otherwise take a lot more to accomplish. In cases of rescuing, this efficiency it's a matter of life and death.The Parrot Recon drone is designed to work in bad weather conditions and rescue human lives in open water. It is equipped with two cameras on the front, in addition to using thermal imaging. Once the drone spots a person, it drops down a floatation device and aid in the process of getting the person on board the rescue ship. During the research phase the drone is able to operate completely by itself.Drones stands in a controversial position, but this new species has a great potential that needs to be explored. When used for positive purposes, drones don't feel intimidating but reassuring. And that feels better, to us humans.Explore more roles drone could play in the What's Flying There? coloring book.Source: TrendHunter [post_title] => Rescue Drone Will Save You in Open Water [post_excerpt] => Drone made to rescue in bad weather condition in open waters. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => using-drones-rescuing-open-water [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 10:03:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 08:03:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=73156/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71621 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-02-18 15:45:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-18 14:45:47 [post_content] => Welcome to the future of self-flying taxi drones, as if self-driving cars weren’t good enough. Chinese drone developer EHang will launch its first passenger-carrying drones this summer in Dubai, which is striving to become the world’s first city to allow such vehicles.Meet the self-flying drone taxi in DubaiThe 184 drone cab model will hit airspace for the first time during the World Government Summit in July later this year. According to the company’s website, the small aircraft is able to carry one person and a small suitcase for a total weight of 117 kilograms and it can fly for half an hour at a peak altitude of 3.5 kilometers. That’s right, no backup pilot. Without joysticks, levers or buttons to press, the passenger is fully dependent on the technology. Simply hop on, select your destination on a touchscreen pad and enjoy the flight. Would you take a trip with this machine?Source: Caixin [post_title] => The Self-Flying Taxi Drone [post_excerpt] => Passenger-carrying drones will hit the skies in Dubai this summer. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => self-flying-taxi-drones [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-18 15:48:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-18 14:48:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71621/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71563 [post_author] => 1091 [post_date] => 2017-02-16 16:14:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-16 15:14:19 [post_content] => A video of a robotic bee pollinating a flower (looking more like Loopin' Louie spinning off the board game and hitting a flower) recently caught our attention. What at first sight might look like a silly viral video, could be an important step in the survival of bees. To save us humans from a future without honey and pollinating crops by hand, we need to save the bees. These insect-sized drones could actually play a major role in their survival.Cyborg insects are nothing new, neither is the robo-bee. Researchers from Wyss Institute at Harvard have been working for years on the development of the next pollinators. But these paperclip-sized, wired robo-bees still need years of further development before they can transfer pollen from flower to flower. Time costs money.[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tAdpFH5hwM[/youtube]Chemist Eijiro Miyako, who is working at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), has found a way to pollinate the Earth with robo-bees in a less expensive way. The researchers used a cheap, small (4 cm), manually controllable toy drone, attached horsehair to the bottom and covered it with a non-degradable sticky gel. The sticky gel was discovered by chance, as it was found in an uncapped bottle years after an experiment went wrong. By transferring pollen grains stuck to the sticky gel from one flower to another, the remote-controlled drone was able to pollinate a Japanese lily with success.As explained by Phys.org:"Although the work is still far from being used in the field, it is a creative first step to addressing a future with fewer bees. The goal would be to decrease the stress put on bee populations by commercialization so that they can do what robots can't - make honey - while the drones take over the demands of crop pollination".This robo-bee pilot needs some flight lessons, but Miyako’s team hopes this project will contribute to counter the problem of bee declines. While team Miyako in Japan is now working on the development of autonomous drones that require GPS, high-res cameras and AI to navigate robo-bees from flower to flower, it might be a good idea for Wyss and Miyako to cross-pollinate their projects and start working together. Because after seeing the Black Mirror episode ‘Hated in the Nation’, it would preferable to have lower-tech, bigger than paperclip-size robo-bees that are not buzzing around in the uncanny valley.Sources: Phys.orgNew Scientist. Image: New Scientist [post_title] => Robo-Bee Pollinated a Japanese Lily [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robo-bee-pollinated-japanese-lilly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-18 15:27:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-18 14:27:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71563/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71190 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-02-09 17:30:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-09 16:30:04 [post_content] => Can we trust robots? This is one of the key questions of the upcoming exhibition Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine. To explore the current rise of robotics Hello, Robot presents over 200 objects, including our Pyramid of Technology poster and What’s Flying There? drones coloring book. The exhibition will open tomorrow, February 10, at the Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany and will run until May 14. Did we mention the opening talk "Life with Robots" (tomorrow at 18:00) by much-celebrated science fiction author Bruce Sterling?More info: Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine Image: TRNDlabs, SKEYE Nano 2 FPV Drone, 2015 [post_title] => "Hello, Robot" Expo at Vitra Design Museum [post_excerpt] => Pyramid of Technology poster and What’s Flying There? coloring book at "Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine" exhibition. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hello-robot-vitra-design-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-09 17:30:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 16:30:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71190/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70860 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-02-06 15:56:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-06 14:56:50 [post_content] => Drones are becoming an integral part of our life. In the future they might control the weather, supply medicines, or maybe even become our best friends. Until that moment, we should consider developing drone regulations for our own safety. Researchers at Virginia Tech are studying the risk of injury caused by drone collision using a crash test dummy.Virginia Tech is one of the FAA-approved drone test sites that by way of biomechanics and crash test science aims to gain a better understanding to the level of injury risks when it comes to using drones in everyday settings. The Federal Aviation Administration is working to develop acceptable risk thresholds and regulate the flight of unmanned aircraft over people in certain situations.“The majority of applications would be much more effective if they weren’t restricted from operating over people, but you have to demonstrate that it can be done safely” says Mark Blanks, director of the Virginia Tech Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership“The risk of injury is very low, particularly with small aircraft. This research can mitigate those risks further. And we have the world’s best team doing it”.At the moment, it is not allowed to operate drones over people unless a special permit has been granted. By safely flying drones into the faces of crash test dummies embedded with sensors, the research team is gathering data to assist the Federal Aviation Administration in its decision-making to evaluate the risks provoked by flying quadcopters to anyone on the ground.Source: VT News [post_title] => Drone Hits Crash Test Dummy for Your Safety [post_excerpt] => Researchers at Virginia Tech are studying the risk of injury from a drone collision by hitting a crash test dummy in the head. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => drone-crash-test-dummy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-06 21:58:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-06 20:58:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70860/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70896 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-01-30 12:25:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-30 11:25:03 [post_content] => In the episode ‘Hated in the Nation’ from British television anthology Black Mirror, a private tech company unleashes a group of robotic honeybees in response to the extinction of real honeybees. It wouldn’t been glorifying in any way, if the show hadn’t turned to a darker side of these drone insects: besides from transferring pollen between flowers and plants to restore ecological imbalance, these robobees set out to kill people. Fact is, this story has nothing to do with robotic killerbees. But what if we told you that a biomedical solutions company is developing a system for insects to wear, allowing engineers to steer them remotely?A Biomedical solutions company is developing a system for insects to wear, allowing engineers to steer it remotely.A team effort from the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) developed the technology to guide the flightpath of dragonflies to deliver payloads, conduct reconnaissance and even aid pollination. Worn like a tiny backpack wired directly into their brain, the system sends guidance commands to the insect's “steering” neurons inside its nerve cord, rather than hijacking all muscle control. The researchers are applying techniques in synthetic biology to make these “steering” neurons sensitive to light by altering genes similar to those naturally found in the eye. This allows them to place "optrodes" into the nervous system and use flashes of light in order to guide their movements.At the moment, the program lead researcher stated they have developed a first-gen prototype, but haven’t actually tested it yet. In theory, the system could be tailored for other insects too, including honeybees. However, cyborg insects are not a new thing. We have recently seen hybrid cockroach robots and bionic beetles, to variable succes. Perhaps one day we will control a human with a technology like this. For now, let's just hope this only happens in another Black Mirror episode.Source: Charles Stark Draper Laboratory [post_title] => Cyborg Dragonfly for Special Service [post_excerpt] => A Biomedical solutions company is developing a system for insects to wear, allowing engineers to steer it remotely. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cyborg-dragonfly-special-service [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-02 12:05:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-02 11:05:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70896/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70342 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-01-17 11:23:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-17 10:23:07 [post_content] => We all know that selfies are self-taken digital photographs. With the arrival of the selfie-stick we have extended the length of our arms with a piece of hardware, to keep taking photos ourselves. What about drones, can they take selfies? According to the IoT Group, they can. Their fold-up flying selfie drone, called ROAM-e, uses a facial recognition software to follow the subject once it takes off. It even shoots 360-degree pictures. Thanks to this drone we will no longer suffer from selfie elbows!Find more about new drones applications in our What's Flying There? coloring book. [post_title] => The Selfie Drone [post_excerpt] => Can a drone take selfies? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-selfie-drone [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-17 11:23:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-17 10:23:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70342 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69225 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2016-12-30 10:03:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-30 09:03:20 [post_content] => Will Avi the bird survive the attack of the military drones? Are we already riding a drone? What's the potential of this new species? Call your children, get your crayons and listen to the What's Flying There? story read by NNN Ambassador Tracy Metz. Take a moment in the rush of the holiday season to watch this video and discover which innovative drones the new year might bring. We hope many of them will be buddy drones!The coloring book What's Flying There? is available in our web shop in English or Dutch. [post_title] => What's Flying There? Flip Through [post_excerpt] => Listen to the What's Flying There? story read by NNN Ambassador Tracy Metz. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => whats-flying-flipthrough [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://nextnature.net/2016/11/meet-budy-drone/ [post_modified] => 2016-12-30 20:00:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-30 19:00:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69225 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79857 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2018-01-11 10:19:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-11 09:19:36 [post_content] => In this Anthropocene era we often think of ourselves as controlling the natural world. But natural disasters, like volcanic eruptions, remind us that our planet can still be dangerously unpredictable. In the Indonesian province of Bali, this danger looms large. But now, scientists are using drones to forestall the danger and make the invisible workings of the volcano visible.

Warning signs: reading the land to predict the future

Mount Agung, the highest point on Bali and a currently active volcano, poses a huge potential danger to the island's inhabitants. But although major seismic activity is underway, volcanoes are unpredictable, and it's always difficult to tell what will happen next.This is where drone company AeroTerrascan came in. Their high-flying drones have been helping in several different ways. Firstly, the drones were sent up to thoroughly scan the volcano from all angles. The data gathered, tracking Agung's shape and size to 20 cm of accuracy, was used to create a detailed 3D map. It's important to have this kind of map because growth in the size of a volcano is a clear indicator of danger. Now scientists can assess future danger by comparing the volcano current size against the map.For their second mission, a brave little drone was sent to fly right over the volcano. This drone was fitted with sensors to detect carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. High levels of these gases indicate an imminent eruption. In this case, unfortunately, the data gathered was bad news, and the government raised Agung's warning level even higher.Which brings us to the drones next proposed task: scanning Agung's surroundings not for geological data, but for people. When evacuation is necessary, it can be difficult to tell if everyone has gotten the message and escaped. When the time comes, these drones could patrol for anyone who might have been left behind.

Beneath the surface: a deeper understanding of invisible processes

These tasks aren't risk-free. Several drones have been lost navigating the 3000 km vertical climb to Agung's peak. Yet if it can save lives, the risk is clearly worth it. And besides this immediate benefit, using drones in this way is part of something bigger. New technologies are allowing us to make typically inscrutable, chaotic elements of nature, phenomena we have lived with for millennia, more comprehensible.Many people fear that technology disconnects us from nature. But in cases like this, at least, it's clear that the opposite is true. We are learning to read the obscure geological signals being sent out by the most violent and unpredictable parts of our world. And doing so not only provides practical benefits, but in the long-run gives us a deeper understanding of our environment.Perhaps it's another example of "making the invisible visible". If what once seemed like the whims of wrathful nature becomes ever more understandable to us, how does our relationship with the planet change? Technological applications like this could be the key to allowing us to treat the Earth like an old familiar friend, rather than a dangerous enemy.Source: Treehugger [post_title] => Drones Protect Indonesia from Volcanic Danger [post_excerpt] => In Bali, volcanic danger looms large. Scientists are trying to use drones to forestall the danger and make the invisible workings of the volcano visible. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => drones-protect-indonesia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-11 10:31:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-11 09:31:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79857/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 24 [max_num_pages] => 3 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => a60fac62031d3bee86054b2b869e2707 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
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