Guided Growth

When the ‘built’ becomes the ‘born’

Humans create some pretty clever designs, but until now, our constructed environment has largely been static. It’s time to take a hint from old nature and teach our buildings and products how to grow, adapt, and repair themselves. Using the principle of guided growth, fruits manufacture their own packaging, and chairs are designed to mimic bones. Even our buildings may eventually have the same urge to eat and breath as the residents inside.

Self–Repairing Architecture

ESSAY BY Rachel Armstrong
June 24th 2010

All buildings today have something in common: They are made using Victorian technologies. This involves blueprints, industrial manufacturing and construction using teams of workers. All this effort results in an inert object, which means there is a one–way transfer of energy from our environment into our homes and cities. This is not sustainable.…

Growth Assembly

Worldwide shipping of manufactured things is very inefficient. How can we ship devices and utensils in a single envelope? As seeds.

Growing a Hidden Architecture

Christian Kerrigan
December 5th 2006

Christian Kerrigan's project, Growing a Ship in a Yew Forest "explores the possibilities of a symbiotic relationship between two different systems of organization, technology and nature— to theoretically alter newly planted trees in the last remaining Yew forest."(Kingley Vale)

Architect & Editor of 'The Space Between'magazine, Christian Kerrigan investigates in his recent work, how man's ability to control his surroundings is intimately linked with his advancing capabilities of using technology.…

Bone Chair

Van Mensvoort
October 8th 2007

Joris Laarman's Bone chair takes its inspiration from the efficient way that bones grow (adding material where strength is needed and taking away material where it's unnecessary).…

Growing Rooms, Buildings & Cities

Van Mensvoort
April 20th 2008

With their project 'Rules of Six' architects Aranda & Lasch envision an unpredictable, self-generating landscape of interlocking hexagons that could represent rooms, buildings or entire urban neighborhoods.…