The Evolution of the Richer

Diogo Correia
April 4th 2008

A Leap in Human Evolution

Are we on the verge of a future human evolution, one that isn’t, at least in it’s very core, “the survival of the fittest”, but rather “the evolution of the richer”?

Think about it: For much of the time throughout the human evolution we lived in societies arranged in castes, based on “virtual” barriers, such as bloodlines and wealth. On those times, one’s status within a society would be dependent on those two items.

Nowadays, at least in the so called Western World, we are very fortunate to live within societies where legally and morally everyone’s perceived as equal, and where, in principle, education, work and health is guaranteed through the State social services (except in the USA). It’s really not surprising to see that the Forbes Most Rich in the World list is mainly composed by self-made men and not people whose wealth and influence was inherited.

But how does this relate to ‘the’ next nature? Currently scientists, bioengineers, medics etc.., are studying and developing technology and alike in order to break free from the limits that nature imposed into us. Like in the music of the French duo Daft Punk: Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger. A leap in our own physical and thinking limitations. Only a scarce bunch of people with enough money will be able to buy such a technology and improve themselves to the point that they no longer resemble a human but they become something of a post-human entity.

These post-humans would be able to achieve things that are impossible to the rest of the people, having what in my eyes would be an unfair advantage in the whole spectrum of a society, in businesses and politics, deepening the already steep barrier between the rich and the poor, eventually preparing the ground for a new kind of caste society, a kind of society that humanity has never seen before.

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”
Animal Farm, George Orwell

Photo by Diogo Correia

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Eloc
Posted 11/09/2008 – 04:25

This is a really interesting article.
I am currently studying sculpture in London, and this is one of the areas that really interests me, and which I base most of my current work on.
Where you were saying "...will we still give value to Knowledge? etc..?" is a very interesting point, and I was thinking furthermore that when these technologies become more widely available, there could well be a decline in their fashionability and maybe the more "natural" human may be more desirable.
Also, when technologies like these become available, I don't see that the poorer will be competing entirely with the rich, as with money doesn't come the innate desire for prosthesis or in fact intelligence, I'm sure only a minority (at least at first) will want these prostheses... that is unless of course these enhancements become a fashionable fad, then every rich mindless "Paris Hilton-ite" will want one... then imagine what the world would be like!
Also, the richer and arguably more privileged people have always had bodily extensions before the poorer, there is no real difference between an implanted mind chip and a current day computer, or phone, or even looking as far back as mechanical calculators or in fact any tool that was purchased with something at any time in the past. We are innately cyborgs.

Shizu
Posted 06/09/2008 – 11:23

"Nowadays, at least in the so called Western World, we are very fortunate to live within societies where legally and morally everyone’s perceived as equal, and where, in principle, education, work and health is guaranteed through the State social services (except in the USA)."
Well, where I live, the government is saying that there is one race that should rank higher above all. So, indeed westerners are more fortunate in that area.

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
Posted 07/04/2008 – 02:01

All human beings are natural, but some might slowly become more natural than others.

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Should men be able to give birth to children?


Joyce Nabuurs: To me this question seems to be a logical next step in the emancipation movement of the past century. More and more women entered the workspace, but the responsibility for pregnancy and childrearing remained female.

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