epaper Will our mobile devices look like this in two years time? This is an example-application of the featherweight QVGA (320x240 pixels) active-matrix display: Phillips e-paper. (It doesn't look very next-nature, does it?) The question is: why are we developping rich information-technology that looks and feels like old media. What's the gain?

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  • I simply love this awesome stuff! http://www.google.com/ don't you?

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  • I simply love this awesome stuff!

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  • =A=

    In the first place my post was to show the technology only. By saying: "It doesn’t look very next-nature, does it?" I figured that someone would react that the picture of this application is not a very forward-thinking, next-nature concept. In my opinion the technology itself could be exactly that. So if this new medium starts off as an imitation of some older medium, I am very curious if we could predict its future development.

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  • > The question is: why are we developping rich information-technology that looks and feels like old media. What’s the gain? Now that is an interesting question Arnoud.. It was totally not clear from your post that you wanted to raise a discussion about epaper in general. Ofcourse the idea of e-paper is ages old, but the implementations tend to be dissapointing. (In fact one could say that the first cathoderay display was already an implementation of e-paper). Often the new medium starts as an imitation of some older medium and then later on the new medium takes over and the old medium starts imitating the new medium. Thats why TV looks so much like internet nowadays.

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  • =A=

    What is going on here: we wish not to accredit this e-paper into a next-nature subject because it is too much of a "gadget" developed by large companies? I agree that the image is a bad example of what this e-paper could contribute to society. But that phone is not the subject of course. The question is: why are we developping rich information-technology that looks and feels like old media. What's the gain? Further: I think it's interesting to see that our first reaction to this technology is something like: "okay... of course... this should exist and someone should have invented it decades ago." But -like Rolf mentioned- I believe that it actually has the potention of changing the way we deal with information. Wouldn't you like to wear a suit made of this stuff..?

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  • I think we all agree that this device is a bad example and not so interesting.. But the electronic paper is really interesting... Just trying to look at the bright side of the post ;)

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  • Hmmm.. Will this new device change our lives.. how?

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  • The idea of electronic paper can be very next nature when you think of the way it will change the way we deal with information.

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  • Typical product of a large technology focussed corporation that believes the future will be like the past, but more technological. This is the electric candlelight of the 21st century if you ask me. Anyhow, I think this post isn't really related to next nature research. Please don't publish every gadget you see on the blog.

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  • > It doesn’t look very next-nature, does it? Then why blog it?

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