14 results for “3D Printing”

This 3D-Printed Structure Can Fold Itself

Charlotte Kuijpers
January 16th 2018
Researchers at the University of Technology in Delft have created flat structures able to fold themselves into three-dimensional constructions.

HUBOT: Meet the Organ Designer

NextNature.net
October 27th 2017
As an organ designer, you develop genetic algorithms from which organs are grown to perfectly fit the recipient’s body, but also to meet the personal wishes of the patient.

Design Your Own Vegetables

Ruben Baart
September 19th 2017
With her project Future Food Formula, food designer Chloé Rutzerveld is looking for innovative methods to design vegetables.

3D Printed Ovaries

Julie Reindl
June 30th 2017
3D printed ovaries help infertile mice to have a healthy offspring.

Plastic Exoskeletons for Turtles

Nadine Roestenburg
February 25th 2017
Antonio Esparza designed the TurtleBag: a 3D printable exoskeleton to help turtles distinguish plastic bags from jellyfish and extend their lifespan.

Rethinking 3D Printing for the Future

Nadine Roestenburg
December 27th 2016
Additivism is a movement that calls for radical rethinking of new technologies, such as 3D printing, the plastification of the world and our human position within it.

Growing Drones From Chemicals

Ruben Baart
July 15th 2016
Researchers are experimenting with a new technology that would be able to grow drones from chemical compounds.

3D-Printed Shell to Save Tortoise’s Life

Margherita Olivo
May 26th 2016
A severely injured tortoise was saved by a team of doctors thanks to a 3D printed shell.

Listening to 3D Printed Records

Alexandra Bremers
November 4th 2015
Let's enjoy some 3D-printed records!

Analogue vs Digital: 3D Printing

NextNature.net
May 13th 2015
In both vases pictured, you can put your flowers in water. The manufacturing process is the analogue/digital difference.
WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [tag] => 3d-printing [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => )[query_vars] => Array ( [tag] => 3d-printing [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [cat] => [tag_id] => 1321 [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( )[category__and] => Array ( )[post__in] => Array ( )[post__not_in] => Array ( )[post_name__in] => Array ( )[tag__in] => Array ( )[tag__not_in] => Array ( )[tag__and] => Array ( )[tag_slug__in] => Array ( [0] => 3d-printing )[tag_slug__and] => Array ( )[post_parent__in] => Array ( )[post_parent__not_in] => Array ( )[author__in] => Array ( )[author__not_in] => Array ( )[ignore_sticky_posts] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => )[tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[field] => term_id [operator] => NOT IN [include_children] => )[1] => Array ( [taxonomy] => post_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => 3d-printing )[field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ))[relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships )[queried_terms] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => 3d-printing )[field] => slug ))[primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID )[meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( )[relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( )[clauses:protected] => Array ( )[has_or_relation:protected] => )[date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 1321 [name] => 3D Printing [slug] => 3d-printing [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 1326 [taxonomy] => post_tag [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 14 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 1321 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1326) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78624 [post_author] => 1433 [post_date] => 2018-01-16 10:51:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-16 09:51:01 [post_content] => Researchers at the University of Technology in Delft have created flat structures able to fold themselves into three-dimensional constructions. Inspired by the art of origami, they designed 3D printed new shape shifting objects.The sequence of the folding parts can even be determined beforehand, which is not necessarily something new. What makes it a breaktrough in open-source possibilities, it's the use of relatively cheap material and tools. This new technique only requires an Ultimaker 3D printer and common PLA filament.Some parts contract before others, this is called sequential shape shifting and enables the user to create complex structures. By printing the 2D-structures with alternating thickness and alignment of the filament, the material will change shape when heated up. To showcase the technique, the researchers created a self-folding tulip.[youtube]https://youtu.be/XeLJd-r5H4M[/youtube]Amir Zadpoor, one of the researchers, envisions the application of this technique in different fields. Maybe we’ll buy a 2D-sheet at IKEA which transforms into a piece of furniture after we put the hairdryer on it for a while. The question is: when will this happen?Source: Tudelft.nl. Image: All3DP [post_title] => This 3D-Printed Structure Can Fold Itself [post_excerpt] => Researchers at the University of Technology in Delft have created flat structures able to fold themselves into three-dimensional constructions. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3d-printed-structure-fold-itself [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-16 10:59:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-16 09:59:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78624/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78167 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-10-27 09:46:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-27 07:46:03 [post_content] => Now that organ printing is a reality, we can start designing body parts as well. As an organ designer, you develop genetic algorithms from which organs are grown to perfectly fit the recipient’s body, but also to meet the personal wishes of the patient. From a liver replacement or a new heart valve, to an extra sense to communicate with a dolphin. You imagine it, you design it. Nothing is too challenging for you. Are you interested in this job? Take the job test and find out if this working position suits you.The organ designer is portrayed by British artist Agi Haines, whose work investigates the potential of our body as a raw material for our engineering fantasies and speculates on the impact of biomedical technologies on the human form. Last year we spoke with her about body modification, science fiction, medical futures and more. Read the interview here. [post_title] => HUBOT: Meet the Organ Designer [post_excerpt] => As an organ designer, you develop genetic algorithms from which organs are grown to perfectly fit the recipient’s body, but also to meet the personal wishes of the patient. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => organ-designer-hubot [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-18 10:39:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-18 09:39:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78167/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 77205 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 10:11:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 08:11:42 [post_content] => Imagine a future where you can design your own vegetables. Say goodbye to growing boring baby sprouts on your windowsill and welcome a climate-controlled cultivation system to your kitchen top. Simply change the parameters of your crops with a touchscreen interface and you’ll be on your way. Sounds good, does it? This growing scenario does not exist yet, but food designer and NNN fellow Chloé Rutzerveld is looking for innovative methods to turn this fantasy into a reality. Introducing the Future Food Formula, a formula for success.[caption id="attachment_77372" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Future Food Formula installation.[/caption]Consider this, humans are technological by nature. You would be surprised to hear that cooking is the first technology humans ever conceived. This invention allowed our ancestors to pre-digest food before eating it, which led to bigger brains and basically let evolution do its part by turning them into the modern human beings we are today. This would explain our constant need to search for smarter, more efficient and more sustainable ways to produce our food (remember Bistro In Vitro?). After all, a population of 7.5 billion people is not easy to feed.With this in mind, Chloé Rutzerveld explored the process of growing - or to be more precise, designing - crops, based on scientific facts, to model the outcome into an interactive installation: Future Food Formula. While doing so, she teamed up with researchers from the University of Wageningen and the Association for Vertical Farming, and payed a visit to leading tech company Phillips. Every time she visited a researchers, she asked this simple question: what exactly influences crops? And how can we manipulate this without using GMO’s?[caption id="attachment_77370" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Future Food Formula opening.[/caption]“It’s about education” the designer says. “It’s important for us to understand to which extent natural processes affect our crops; these processes keep the vegetation stable”. Chloé single-handedly created charts to map the parameters that determine crops outcome and wondered what would happen if she could convert that knowledge into new crop variations:“I looked into the growth processes of crops and considered their functionalities: how do crops respond to light? Or to warmth? Having obtained this information, I discovered that I was able to adjust the nutritional values of our crops, but also the taste, color, size etc. It was exciting to discover the endless possibilities to create new crops by simply using nature - and technology enabled me to cope with these factors. This is not a new thing, when modern farmers grow crops in laboratories, efficiency stands first. It’s no a coincidence if tomatoes have that specific red-warm color!”.[caption id="attachment_77371" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Setting the parameters to design vegetables.[/caption]Chloé transformed the crop data into 2D drawings, then she collaborated with RNDR to animate them. This way the visitors of the installation gain a playful understanding of the growing processes of vegetables. “Imagine a future where everyone has his own cultivation system on his kitchen top, this would turn consumers into operating green-keepers” the designer explains. “Downloading and upvoting such recipes to a certain database, would give producers an insight into consumers’ demands”.Partial speculation, partial science, Chloé’s vision promises an exciting future for our diet and cooking appliances. It may as well be a matter of time before her growing methods would available in a kitchen near you. Until then, we advise you to visit Future Food Formula and discover what does it mean to have vegetables on your fingertips.You can visit Future Food Formula at RAUM in Utrecht, The Netherlands, where Chloé Rutzerveld has been artist-in-residence over the last few months. The installation will be open until October 17, every Wednesday afternoon (15:00 - 18:00) and Sunday (12:00 - 18:00). After this exhibition, the installation will travel to the Dutch Design Week as part of the Embassy of Food exhibition at the Ketelhuisplein in Eindhoven. DDW runs from October 21 until October 29.Photography: Bram Saeys. Cover image: Stef ArendsDo you want to stay up to date about the NNN fellows and other NNN news? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => Design Your Own Vegetables [post_excerpt] => With her project Future Food Formula, food designer Chloé Rutzerveld is looking for innovative methods to design vegetables. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-vegetables [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-21 15:48:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-21 13:48:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=77205/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75062 [post_author] => 1317 [post_date] => 2017-06-30 10:27:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-30 08:27:05 [post_content] => Bones, skulls, skin cells, 3D printing plays a big role in today's medicine and its presence will continue to grow. Researchers developed a new 3D printed bioprosthesis: in vitro ovaries made of biodegradable scaffold that might one day help women struggling with infertility.This new technique is revolutionizing the field by completely relying on 3D printing. After having successfully implanted artificial ovaries in mice, scientists succeeded in creating a more stable environment for the growing eggs, increasing their chance of survival. The 3D printer uses natural gelatin which is constructed onto glass slides. Through constant overlapping, the printer generates different interweaved patterns, such patterns are key for the success. Through its tightly build structure, mice follicles (meaning a still developing mouse egg) and its surrounding hormone producing cells are then insert in its new gelatin ovary, ready to be implanted in the mouse body - resulting in an ovulating mouse, able to give birth to a new line of offsprings.As 3D printing holds the mechanical possibility to reproduce materials on a large scale, what will this mean for the future of human reproduction? Testing the process in species closely related to humans will be the next step for the researchers. This procedure will not only help the patients, but it will also raise questions on how our reproduction system might look like in the future.Source: Popular Science. Image: All3DPTo learn more about the way technology radically alters our attitude towards reproduction, but also to gender, relationships and love in the 21st century, tune in on the Artificial Womb research project. [post_title] => 3D Printed Ovaries [post_excerpt] => 3D printed ovaries help infertile mice to have a healthy offspring. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3d-printed-ovaries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-30 10:32:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-30 08:32:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=75062/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69757 [post_author] => 1091 [post_date] => 2017-02-25 15:15:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-25 14:15:09 [post_content] => Turtles love jellyfish. Unfortunately, they often mistake plastic bags for their favorite food. According to the United Nations Environment Program each year 100,000 marine mammals, including sea turtles, die from ocean pollution and ingestion or entanglement in marine debris; waste directly or indirectly disposed in oceans, rivers and other waterways. Antonio Esparza designed the TurtleBag: a 3D printable exoskeleton to help turtles distinguish plastic bags from jellyfish and extend their lifespan.The TurtleBag is an exoskeleton that, with plastic muscles, compresses a pair of vacuum bags on top of the turtle’s shell. It uses one-way valves to swallow plastic bags through a small gap. When the turtle stretches its neck, the entrance valve opens. It still needs some testing and awaits multi-material desktop 3D printers. But according to Antonio Esparza, the TurtleBag should work because plastic bags are completely compressible while jellyfish are not.Instead of questioning if we should persevere nature, Esparza suggests the use of additive manufacturing for peaceful coexistence. The TurtleBag is exemplary for our human way of speeding up other species’ evolution to let them survive the Anthropocene. 3D printing already saved some tortoise’s lives, the TurtleBag might be lifesaving for many. This project is featured in the 3D Additivist Cookbook. You can download the 3D Additivist Cookbook online in 3D PDF, including the 3D files to print TurtleBags. Sources: 3D Additivist CookbookUnited Nations Environment Program [post_title] => Plastic Exoskeletons for Turtles [post_excerpt] => Antonio Esparza designed the TurtleBag: a 3D printable exoskeleton to help turtles distinguish plastic bags from jellyfish and extend their lifespan. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => plastic-exoskeletons-prevent-turtles-eating-plastic [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-01 13:06:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-01 12:06:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69757 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 69753 [post_author] => 1091 [post_date] => 2016-12-27 16:04:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-27 15:04:15 [post_content] => You don’t have to visit New York for a nice plastic souvenir of the Statue of Liberty anymore, you can easily 3D print one yourself. With 3D printing becoming more and more omnipresent, souvenirs of places you have never been to, and a load of other useless crap, are just a few clicks (and if you don’t own a 3D printer, a short walk to the nearest fablab) away.Additivism (a portmanteau of additive and activism) is a movement that calls for radical rethinking of new technologies, such as 3D printing, the plastification of the world and our human position within it. Additivism has declared that the world’s splendour has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of crap and detritus.According to them "your shiny plastic future is a load of crap". To move beyond the crapularity they launched the 3D Additivist Manifesto: a call to accelerate the development of the 3D printer and push it to their absolute limits and even beyond, into the speculative, the provocative and the weird. Additivism seeks the unexplored potential of the 3D printer. Because every new technology comes with unintended affects that can lead to new ideas, insights, products, and possibilities.[caption id="attachment_69798" align="aligncenter" width="495"]Additivism Additivism[/caption]The 3D Additivist Cookbook, edited by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke, presents speculative, imaginative and provocative works from more than 100 artists, activists and theorists. You can download the 3D Additivist Cookbook online in 3D PDF, including the 3D files or instructions you need to save turtles, print your own Nefertiti bust, or your favorite song.[caption id="attachment_69800" align="alignnone" width="495"]Additivism Additivism, 3D Additivist Cookbook[/caption]Source: 3D Additivist Cookbook. Images: Additivism [post_title] => Rethinking 3D Printing for the Future [post_excerpt] => Additivism is a movement that calls for radical rethinking of new technologies, such as 3D printing, the plastification of the world and our human position within it. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => rethinking-3d-printing-future [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-29 11:09:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-29 10:09:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=69753 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 64883 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-07-15 11:22:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-15 09:22:00 [post_content] => Researchers from BAE Systems together with the University of Glasgow are experimenting with a new technology that in theory would be able to grow small-scale Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) from chemical compounds. The breeding of drones explores how aircraft could be designed and manufactured in the future.Professor Lee Cronin from the University of Glasgow commented: “This is a very exciting time in the development of chemistry. We have been developing routes to digitize synthetic and materials chemistry and at some point in the future hope to assemble complex objects in a machine from the bottom up, or with minimal human assistance. Creating small aircraft would be very challenging but I’m confident that creative thinking and convergent digital technologies will eventually lead to the digital programming of complex chemical and material systems”.growing-drones-labCronin is developing a so-called “chemputer” that accelerates the chemical reaction from the molecular level. In a matter of days or weeks, the liquid molecular components evolve into a drone fully embedded with electronics. “This unique UK technology could use environmentally sustainable materials and support military operations where a multitude of small UAVs with a combination of technologies serving a specific purpose might be needed quickly”.growing-drones-lab-1As both passenger jets and warplanes are already flying with parts made from a 3D printer, this same technology is used to build drones. In less then a year we have seen how the first jet-powered 3D printed UAV went from concept to flight in nine months. Followed by a four meter long, completely 3D printed UAV, printed over the course of a month. Cronin is taking 3D printing to a whole another level. In an interview with Digital Trends he stated: “What BAE is interested in is being able to 3D print a test tube or framework, to which you can then add chemicals and [have] those chemicals then self-assemble at nano scale to make new kinds of nano-materials”.growing-drones-2The breeding of drones could be a scientific breakthrough in the development of modern warfare. Professor Nick Colosimo, BAE Systems Global Engineering Fellow, is interested in how this technology “could tackle the military threats of the future”. The US Air Force already trains more drone operators than fighter pilots, relying on remote controlled vehicles. According to Colosimo, "the world of military and civil aircraft is constantly evolving”, with BAE Systems currently leading the evolution.Source: BAE Systems. Images: Digital Trends [post_title] => Growing Drones From Chemicals [post_excerpt] => Researchers are experimenting with a new technology that would be able to grow drones from chemical compounds. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => growing-drones-chemicals [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-07-18 16:46:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-18 14:46:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=64883 [menu_order] => 164 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63962 [post_author] => 864 [post_date] => 2016-05-26 14:10:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-26 12:10:17 [post_content] => It is widely known that 3D printing is a revolutionary technology. Several surgeons and medical students are using it to improve the learning process and to advance medical science, forging new frontiers in the field. Of course bio-printing will be the next step, but until it becomes widely adopted, 3D can still save lives. We are familiar with several interventions where this technology helped save human lives, such as the 3D printed face and skull, but in this case we're talking about saving defenseless, animal lives.Fred is a female tortoise from the South American region of Brasilia. Last year she was severely injured in a violent forest fire and was found nearly-dead by a veterinarian a few weeks later. Her conditions were very bad and her shell completely destroyed. It took a forward-thinking team of veterinarians and doctors, known as the Animal Avengers, to save her life. By taking multiple pictures of her and of similar specimens, they were able to 3D print a perfectly new shell. During the surgery they noticed that it was fitting so perfectly that no screws were required to keep it in place.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIiXqyoxZEA[/youtube]Soon she became the symbol of how technology, in specific 3D printing, can benefit all forms of life thanks to its obvious versatility. This case is inspiring doctors and especially veterinarians around the world to adopt the same technique in similar situations. The only thing that was not working out perfectly was its aspect. That is why the team asked Brazilian artist Yuri Caldera to paint the replica to make it look like the tortoise-shell Fred was born with. “This is a mark in veterinary medicine” said Dr. Rodrigo Rabello, who found Fred and named her after the horror movie icon. “It is the first prosthetic of a 3D shell of a tortoise in the world. From now on we will have a new age. Specially when it comes to wild animals".3d printed shell fred tortoiseSource and images: Animal Avengers [post_title] => 3D-Printed Shell to Save Tortoise's Life [post_excerpt] => A severely injured tortoise was saved by a team of doctors thanks to a 3D printed shell. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3d-printed-shell-save-tortoises-life [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://nextnature.net/2016/02/3d-printer-creates-living-human-tissue/ [post_modified] => 2016-05-26 14:10:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-05-26 12:10:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63962 [menu_order] => 232 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 58418 [post_author] => 861 [post_date] => 2015-11-04 16:00:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-04 15:00:36 [post_content] => Amanda Ghassaei, currently a student at the Center for Bits and Atoms at MIT Media Lab, is a former employee at the do-it-yourself website Instructables.com. Back then she developed ways to 3D print and laser cut vinyl records."In order to explore the current limits of 3D printing, I've created a technique for converting digital audio files into 3D-printable, 33rpm records that play on ordinary turntables. Though the audio quality is low, the audio output is still easily recognizable - the records have a sampling rate of 11kHz and 5-6 bit resolution".On her website, she explains how this was done, and provides a nice video on the process.[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/61210101[/vimeo]Although the quality of the sound is still far from ideal, the project is a great exploration of the status quo of 3D printing technology, especially linked to a slightly nostalgic medium such as vinyl records. The entire, elaborate instructions to create your 3D printed record can be found at Instructables.com. Let's enjoy some 3D-printed 80's new wave music![youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCAI40HRfQY[/youtube]Via: Instructables, Amanda Ghassaei [post_title] => Listening to 3D Printed Records [post_excerpt] => Let's enjoy some 3D-printed records! [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => nirvana-pixies-new-order-meet-girl-3d-prints-records [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://vimeo.com/61210101 [post_modified] => 2015-11-03 16:44:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-03 15:44:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=58418 [menu_order] => 463 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 44224 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2015-05-13 13:15:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-13 11:15:10 [post_content] => In both vases pictured, you can put your flowers into water. Both are analogue objects. The manufacturing process is the analogue/digital difference in this case. The vase pictured at right is a 3D printed vase, completely digitally processed by a 3D printer. It is believed that in the near future we will all have a 3D printer at home. Will we be giving them commands to print our home accessories, food or maybe even our own organs?From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game [post_title] => Analogue vs Digital: 3D Printing [post_excerpt] => In both vases pictured, you can put your flowers in water. The manufacturing process is the analogue/digital difference. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => analogue-vs-digital-3d-printing [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 21:27:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-12 19:27:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=44224 [menu_order] => 659 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78624 [post_author] => 1433 [post_date] => 2018-01-16 10:51:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-16 09:51:01 [post_content] => Researchers at the University of Technology in Delft have created flat structures able to fold themselves into three-dimensional constructions. Inspired by the art of origami, they designed 3D printed new shape shifting objects.The sequence of the folding parts can even be determined beforehand, which is not necessarily something new. What makes it a breaktrough in open-source possibilities, it's the use of relatively cheap material and tools. This new technique only requires an Ultimaker 3D printer and common PLA filament.Some parts contract before others, this is called sequential shape shifting and enables the user to create complex structures. By printing the 2D-structures with alternating thickness and alignment of the filament, the material will change shape when heated up. To showcase the technique, the researchers created a self-folding tulip.[youtube]https://youtu.be/XeLJd-r5H4M[/youtube]Amir Zadpoor, one of the researchers, envisions the application of this technique in different fields. Maybe we’ll buy a 2D-sheet at IKEA which transforms into a piece of furniture after we put the hairdryer on it for a while. The question is: when will this happen?Source: Tudelft.nl. Image: All3DP [post_title] => This 3D-Printed Structure Can Fold Itself [post_excerpt] => Researchers at the University of Technology in Delft have created flat structures able to fold themselves into three-dimensional constructions. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 3d-printed-structure-fold-itself [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-16 10:59:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-16 09:59:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78624/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 13 [max_num_pages] => 2 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => f824e024914f118acc960ea80d0433b4 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
load more