26 results for “Digital Native”

19th Century Sculpture Seems to Be Holding a Smartphone

Jack Caulfield
January 31st 2018
Today's peculiar image comes from New York's Met Museum. No, the woman depicted in the sculpture isn't holding a smartphone!

Speech Development Lost in Screens

Elle Zhan Wei
May 19th 2017
A study shows that screen time for kids between six months and two years triggers expressive speech delay.

NANO Supermarket at RSG Broklede

NextNature.net
February 12th 2017
The Nano Supermarket was invited to the first edition of Broklede Inspiration Day at ROC Broklede, a high school in the Netherlands.

Put Your Phone on Theatre Mode in Cinemas

Ruben Baart
January 7th 2017
A new feature rumored to be in the next iOS update called Theater Mode could dim smartphone usage in cinemas.

The Reinvention of Children’s Books

Mathilde Nakken
November 16th 2016
Why are children still learning to read from a book? Therefore Amazon is reinventing the children’s book in the form of an educational reading app, called Rapids.

Flip-Flop Selfie

Mathilde Nakken
September 26th 2016
These two boys use the nap of their flip-flop as a camera to take an imaginary selfie. Still, their selfie went viral and it became our peculiar image of the week.

In Defense of the Eggplant

Ruben Baart
September 2nd 2016
The eggplant emoji became a political weapon and gain cult status being the forbidden fruit of the web.

Virtual Bedtime Stories

Ruben Baart
May 8th 2016
Samsung just revealed the prototype version of Bedtime VR Stories, a technology that connects parents to their children in virtual reality, right before bedtime.

The New Cinema Is Smartphone-Friendly

Margherita Olivo
April 21st 2016
Cinemas for Millennials will include special sections where texting is allowed.

Next Nature and Next Generations

Elise Marcus
April 17th 2016
Our workshop with kids from Lanterna Magica, an unconventional primary school in Amsterdam.
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Digital natives have trouble understanding life before 24/7 online connectivity. [parent] => 0 [count] => 26 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 286 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (290) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 80173 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2018-01-31 09:37:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-31 08:37:08 [post_content] => Today's peculiar image comes from New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Take a second look. No, the woman depicted in the sculpture isn't holding a smartphone. If at first glance you thought she was, you wouldn't be alone. The sculpture, Erastus Dow Palmer's "The Indian Girl" (1856), actually depicts a Native American woman holding a crucifix. But in the last few years, visitors have had a quite different impression of the piece. In our smartphone-saturated world, it's hard to see a figure looking intently at an object in its hand without instantly assuming it's a phone. Looking at the past through the eyes of the present can have uncanny results!Source: Motherboard. Image: The Met [post_title] => 19th Century Sculpture Seems to Be Holding a Smartphone [post_excerpt] => Today's peculiar image comes from New York's Met Museum. No, the woman depicted in the sculpture isn't holding a smartphone! [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 19th-century-sculpture-smartphone [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-31 09:37:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-31 08:37:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=80173 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 74537 [post_author] => 1324 [post_date] => 2017-05-19 08:29:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-19 06:29:58 [post_content] => Recent researches cast attention to screen time for children. The results show how the time kids spend playing with smartphones, tablets and other handheld screens has a direct negative influence on the development or their expressive speech.A four-year long study with almost 900 kids between six months and two years of age was conducted in Toronto, at the Hospital for Sick Children. "This is the first study to report an association between hand-held screen time and increased risk of expressive language delay" said Dr. Catherine Birken. Every 30-minute increase in daily screen time was linked to a 49% increased risk of what the researchers call expressive speech delay, which is using sounds and words.With screens everywhere today, it might be hard to take them away from kids. Maybe the heart of the issue is how can we make screen time more educative to actually facilitate our children to be eloquent, instead of the other way around. A true futuristic screen should help kids develop into sympathetic, loving and wholesome beings.Source: Nature World News. Image: Gizmodo [post_title] => Speech Development Lost in Screens [post_excerpt] => A study shows that screen time for kids between six months and two years triggers expressive speech delay. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => speech-development-lost-screens [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-20 10:17:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-20 08:17:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=74537/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 71320 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-02-12 16:28:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-12 15:28:35 [post_content] => Last week our NANO Supermarket pop-up store was invited to the first edition of Broklede Inspiration Day at RSG Broklede, a high school in Breukelen, The Netherlands. The theme of the day was innovation, and was aimed to let youngsters explore future possibilities in our rapidly changing digital era. The students who visited the indoor exhibition were amazed by the inventive products on the NANO Supermarket shelves and their underlying implications; their only disappointment was the fact that some of the items still don't exist!Book the NANO Supermarket to your school and explore speculative nanotech products that may hit the market within the next ten years. [post_title] => NANO Supermarket at RSG Broklede [post_excerpt] => The Nano Supermarket was invited to the first edition of Broklede Inspiration Day at ROC Broklede, a high school in the Netherlands. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => nano-supermarket-roc-broklede [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=71320/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 70178 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2017-01-07 11:04:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-07 10:04:31 [post_content] => We all know how annoying it gets to sit next to a person in the theatre who is continuously using the phone. But according to Sonny Dickson, things are about to change. The Australian famed “Apple leaker”, who notably reveals accurate information when it comes to new tech, wrote: “iOS 10.3 to feature a new Theatre mode”. The initial update is scheduled for January 10th and has many users speculating on screen level brightness and the disabling of notifications. If the function will be truly launched, it will be a matter of days. Until then, we can just switch our phone off.Source: The Guardian [post_title] => Put Your Phone on Theatre Mode in Cinemas [post_excerpt] => A new feature rumored to be in the next iOS update called Theater Mode could dim smartphone usage in cinemas. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => put-phone-theatre-mode-cinemas [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-07 11:04:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-07 10:04:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=70178 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 68243 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2016-11-16 12:59:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-16 11:59:09 [post_content] => In today's rapidly moving society, even the biggest bibliophiles have problems finding the time to sit down with a good book. Though we never stop reading. Tons of digital letters cross our eyes daily, from email to Twitter feed. So, why are kids still learning to read from a book? Amazon is reinventing the children’s book in the form of an educational reading app called Rapids."Stories come alive, one message at the time" is the slogan of Rapids, aimed at children from seven to 12 years old. The app includes stories that can be read like a chat conversation. For example, you can find an adventures chat dialogue between two chickens, who even send images to each other. If the reader comes across an unknown word, the app will provide the definition. Rapids has also a feature called “Read to me”, which allows  a very robotic voice to read to the child. Imagine if Siri was in charge of reading you bedtime stories.The overall idea is to get kids reading and interacting in a way that feels natural and gives them confidence to read independently on a device they’re already familiar with. But critics asks if this app can really help kids develop a lifelong love of reading. The answers seems to be positive, after all we’re talking about an educational app. Experts, however, warn that increased screen time alone is harmful for children after a certain point.Does this new tech work better than existing reading tools? What is sure is that when you grow up with the notion that reading is fun, you are more likely to read novels when you are older. For now, we do not have to wave the traditional book goodbye. Surprisingly, this year Amazon also opened the doors of its first physical bookstore.Source: Wired. Image: Rapids [post_title] => The Reinvention of Children's Books [post_excerpt] => Why are children still learning to read from a book? Therefore Amazon is reinventing the children’s book in the form of an educational reading app, called Rapids. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => reinvention-childrens-book [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://fortune.com/2016/09/20/amazon-boston-bookstore/ [post_modified] => 2016-11-18 12:28:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-11-18 11:28:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=68243 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 67030 [post_author] => 936 [post_date] => 2016-09-26 11:02:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-26 09:02:37 [post_content] => Taking a selfie is not as obvious as it might seem. About five billion people, of the 7.4 living on our planet, don't own a smartphone. These two boys use the nap of their flip-flop as a camera to take an imaginary selfie. Still, their selfie went viral and became our peculiar image of the week.Image via Volkskrant [post_title] => Flip-Flop Selfie [post_excerpt] => These two boys use the nap of their flip-flop as a camera to take an imaginary selfie. Still, their selfie went viral and it became our peculiar image of the week. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => peculiar-image-week-flip-flop-selfie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-21 11:40:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-21 09:40:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=66064 [menu_order] => 31 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 65637 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-09-02 11:10:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-02 09:10:05 [post_content] => After the cucumber and the banana, there is a new phallic fruit in town. The eggplant emoji, also known as aubergine, was added to the official Unicode 6.0 emoji set in 2010. The flourishing ‘dictionary’ of 1.851 ideograms depicts a broad range of small digital icons to boost text messages and is gradually evolving into a parallel visual language of its own, where suggested meanings are up for grabs.Emoji became available in 1999 in Japan with the aim to popularize pagers among teenagers. Nearly a decade before the launch of the Apple App Store, designer Shigetaka Kurita was working on his original lexicon of characters while simultaneously developing i-mode, which became the world’s first leading mobile Internet platform. This resulted in a set of 176 pictographic images that laid the foundation for emoji today. To put this in context, in 2015, for the first time ever, the Oxford Dictionaries declared the so-called Face with Tears of Joy emoji ‘word’ of the year.Emoji became a vital part of our daily conversations, but there is a character in particular that stood out ever since its release, the solanum melongena. The eggplant symbol portrays a long, slender, oblong species of the Japanese eggplant, which is considered a token of luck when appearing during Hatsuyume, the first dream of the New Year. Unfortunately, the humble concept behind the fruit had turned into a dark fantasy, as the purple nightshade was crudely adopted into sexually loaded emoji-lingo. Millennials - mainly based in the US - are using the symbol to represent male genitalia or as carnal innuendo, raising concerns towards non-consensual communication.A recent study investigated the emoji use per country. The report found that along a chicken leg, a skull, and lipstick, the eggplant scored highest in the US. While there are different ways to interpret emoji meanings, we can never ensure the fruit is solely being sent for exchanging recipes. So, how did US millennials become so obsessed with the phallic fruit?Before Emoji (BE), sex education in the US was taught under the pretense of botany. Since the 1950s (or 49 BE) the reproduction of plants was carefully taught, hoping the students would comprehend the metaphor. Since the 1980s (or 19 BE) the banana and the cucumber were introduced to the educational program, these phallic stand-ins were supposed to teach adolescents how to work a prophylactic. However, at the present moment sex education is lacking. Even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided guidelines for teaching students about sex, the curriculum is far worse in reality. Resulting in a society that assigns specific meanings to digital icons.Due to the carnal usage of the pictogram under the hashtag #eggplantfriday, this has led to Instagram banning the icon from its search algorithm. According to CNN"A spokesman for Instagram said the eggplant emoji was made unsearchable because it was 'consistently associated' with photos or videos that violate the social network’s community standards". Internet users around the world responded with the hashtag #freetheeggplant, modeled after the #freethenipple campaign that advocated gender equality.Now that the aubergine had turned into a political weapon and gained cult status being the forbidden fruit of the web, all we can do is to defend its status and wait for the next phallic fruit to come around.Sources: Know Your Meme, EmojipediaUnicode, The Verge Image via Electric Didact [post_title] => In Defense of the Eggplant [post_excerpt] => The eggplant emoji became a political weapon and gain cult status being the forbidden fruit of the web. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => in-defense-of-the-eggplant [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/11/word-of-the-year-2015-emoji/ https://blog.swiftkey.com/americans-love-skulls-brazilians-love-cats-swiftkey-emoji-meanings-report/ [post_modified] => 2016-10-30 11:12:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-30 09:12:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=65637 [menu_order] => 87 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63476 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2016-05-08 09:33:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-08 07:33:38 [post_content] => For parents under modern demands who are often away from home and miss that last special moment of the day, an app has appeared. Samsung just revealed the prototype version of Bedtime VR Stories, a technology that connects parents to their children in virtual reality, right before bedtime.“Using individual VR headsets, the app creates a VR story environment where parent and child can see and interact with each other, for an immersive shared experience”. The app is currently being tested by families in the UK.The idea is that the parent utilizes a Samsung Gear VR, whereas the child simply needs a Google Cardboard (or equivalent) headset. According to Tom’s Guide, the Gear VR is one of the first virtual reality headsets available for mobile consumers and “delivers an exceptional virtual-reality experience in a lightweight headset at an affordable price”.Conor Pierce, VP of Samsung UK says: “We've harnessed the power of VR to reunite parents and children for a unique storytelling experience, giving us a glimpse of what the traditional story time may look like in the very near future”.However, the majority of VR headset manufacturers are settings age limits. Samsung’s product manager for Gear VR, Namkung Boo says the headset “is not recommended for use by children under the age of 13” and “should only be used in 30 minute bursts so as not to damage your eyes”.Marty Banks, professor of optometry at the University of California, Berkeley, has not yet seen factual evidence of a child who was adversely affected by wearing a VR headset. “My guess is that all they’re doing is saying that kids are developing and development slows down when they reach adolescence, and so lets just play it safe and say that while these kids are undergoing significant development, we’ll advise people not to let them use it”.VR being a relatively new medium has not been given the chance to study its long- term effects, particularly on children. An excessive focus on the side effects of VR could lead to a denial of virtual intimacy. As solutions to the short-term effects are already in place, Bedtime VR Stories takes a leading role in narrating a utopian vision on remote parenting by offering the most wonderful place to be. Whether this place is in your bed, online or both, it is all a matter of perspective.[youtube]http://youtu.be/XRbAvieBXfc[/youtube]Source: Samsung. Image: International Business Time [post_title] => Virtual Bedtime Stories [post_excerpt] => Samsung just revealed the prototype version of Bedtime VR Stories, a technology that connects parents to their children in virtual reality, right before bedtime. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virtual-bedtime-stories [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://nextnature.net/2015/09/virtual-motion-sickness/ [post_modified] => 2016-05-13 17:52:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-05-13 15:52:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63476 [menu_order] => 254 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 63119 [post_author] => 864 [post_date] => 2016-04-21 13:55:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-21 12:55:45 [post_content] => The use of smartphones is now ongoing and intense, especially among certain categories of the population. The addiction could becomes annoying when people are unable to disconnect even in a theater or at the movies. The urge to constantly take pictures or clips, chat or post on Facebook is what pushed American movie theater chain AMC Entertainment to introduce "text friendly" theaters. Strictly reserved to those who cannot stop texting.AMC is in fact trying to bring back young people to the cinema by offering high-speed Wi-Fi and allowing the use of smartphones. Streaming platforms, such as Netflix and HBO Go, are keeping young people on their sofas even more. The movies will have to be reshaped sooner or later, and we now see new kinds of cinema experiences trying to make the events more exciting, such as the VR Cinema, in Amsterdam.  "When you tell a 22-year-old to turn off the phone, don’t ruin the movie, they hear please cut off your left arm above the elbow" said Adam Aron, AMC's CEO. "You can’t tell a 22-year-old to turn off their cellphone. That’s not how they live their life. At the same time, though, we’re going to have to figure out a way to do it that doesn’t disturb today’s audiences".The solution can only be one: the introduction of reserved sections or entire rooms to young audiences. The challenge is to prevent conflicts between different generations, which have opposite consumption patterns and different thresholds of attention. These distinct categories of public have different needs and values, therefore it makes sense for them to separate the two. "We need to reshape our product in some concrete ways so that millennials go to movie theaters with the same degree of intensity as baby boomers went to movie theaters throughout their lives".Source: Variety. Image: Shutterstock [post_title] => The New Cinema Is Smartphone-Friendly [post_excerpt] => Cinemas for Millennials will include special sections where texting is allowed. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-cinema-millennials [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-21 13:55:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-21 12:55:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=63119 [menu_order] => 275 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 62860 [post_author] => 867 [post_date] => 2016-04-17 16:00:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-17 15:00:29 [post_content] => How to explain the Next Nature philosophy to the next generations? Recently we've been reading, talking, interviewing and drawing to create a workshop to illustrate this concept to kids. We could hardly wait to test our ideas and see how much young people already know about technology and biology.Last week we had the opportunity to have a first test round with ten children from Laterna Magica, a new unconventional primary school in Amsterdam, IJburg. While an interactive video was playing and explaining the idea of Biology and Technology, the children where making all kinds of fun and joyful sounds: whispering and reacting on what they saw and heard. The interactive video contains three steps.Step 1: Observing. Looking into your own direct environment, the room where you are in, to try to understand to notion of biology and technology.Step 2: Playing and talking. Playing the Next Nature memory game and trying to discover the compartments between technology and biology.Step 3: Imagining and creating. In this last step all the children got a paper to create and draw their own idea of a next nature.Next Nature drawing collageIt was amazing to see how bright these children are and eager to learn and share new ideas. They imagined future scenarios in which technology and biology will merge and balance. A river will flow through the walls of our house and our own personal waste will be turned into food. Meanwhile, outside the trees will be walking. Yes, you've read this well! The trees will be walking to a location with more water when they feel their feet are getting too dry. And when there is a fire? Well, you just use your fire app to turn it off. These are just some of the scenarios the kids envisioned for the world of the future, a place where these children would like to live in. Because in the end, this is the generation that can bring next nature to the next level. [post_title] => Next Nature and Next Generations [post_excerpt] => Our workshop with kids from Lanterna Magica, an unconventional primary school in Amsterdam. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => next-nature-next-generations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-15 16:17:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-15 15:17:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=62860 [menu_order] => 280 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 80173 [post_author] => 1425 [post_date] => 2018-01-31 09:37:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-31 08:37:08 [post_content] => Today's peculiar image comes from New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Take a second look. No, the woman depicted in the sculpture isn't holding a smartphone. If at first glance you thought she was, you wouldn't be alone. The sculpture, Erastus Dow Palmer's "The Indian Girl" (1856), actually depicts a Native American woman holding a crucifix. But in the last few years, visitors have had a quite different impression of the piece. In our smartphone-saturated world, it's hard to see a figure looking intently at an object in its hand without instantly assuming it's a phone. Looking at the past through the eyes of the present can have uncanny results!Source: Motherboard. Image: The Met [post_title] => 19th Century Sculpture Seems to Be Holding a Smartphone [post_excerpt] => Today's peculiar image comes from New York's Met Museum. No, the woman depicted in the sculpture isn't holding a smartphone! 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