11 results for “Nextnature Workshop”

Q: How will a technology enter the human habitat?

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
August 13th 2019

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

In the late nineties, the Tamagotchi egg was released. A small egg-shaped device that contained a digital creature that the owner had to ‘breed’ and take care of. The toy somehow normalized the experience of having some digital device in your pocket that sometimes seems to live a life of its own and that needs your attention. A lot of attention. It was around the same time that the …

Q: Is the technology outside or inside your body?

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
July 18th 2019

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

The first computers barely fit in your living room. This all changed with the introduction of the desktop computer which sits, well, on your desk. The laptop is designed to live on your lap and your smartphone is made to live in your pocket (but has more computing power than that first computer). One conclusion could be that while computing power increases, the sizes of computers shrink — and …

Q: How will technology enchant us?

Hendrik-Jan Grievink
July 11th 2019

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

Take a mundane object from your house. Now ask yourself: How will this particular technology enchant me? Household objects we find mundane now, once enchanted people — why?

Arthur C. Clarke stated that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”. Think about it, your smartphone is basically a black box that allows you to connect with your grandmother on the other side of the planet, as if through …

If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose?

Meike Schipper
June 26th 2018

Color-blind artist Neil Harbisson designed a brain-implanted antenna that converts colors into sound. This enables him to hear colors he cannot see, and extends his vision to ultraviolets and infrareds. As technology is rapidly advancing, and the boundaries between the body and technology are blurred and ambiguous, it seems plausible that humans will use technologies not only to enhance, but also to extend their physical capabilities. …

Next Nature Academy presents: A workshop-in-a-box for your team

NextNature.net
June 12th 2018

Are you working on projects where technology and human interaction are involved, and are you looking for a new approach? As of today, we offer a brand new workshop concept for you and your team. In just two hours you learn how to work with the Pyramid of Technology toolbox in an active, dynamic and 100% analogue way!…

Next Nature Network x Border Sessions:
Calling for festival bloggers!

NextNature.net
April 16th 2018

Calling all bloggers! We’d love to have you on board for the 2018 Border Sessions festival in The Hague (NL). Join our team for behind-the-scenes access to festival events.…

NEW: Next Nature Academy

NextNature.net
November 23rd 2017
The Next Nature Academy offers the philosophy, the tools and the methods that will shift the way you think about nature and technology.

Do a Next Nature Workshop!

NextNature.net
September 24th 2017
NNN organizes workshops using a physical Pyramid of Technology as conceptual tool.

Artificial Womb Workshop at BioClub Tokyo

NextNature.net
August 31st 2017
On August 8, NNN gave a workshop at BioClub Tokyo to share some insights on the future of technologies concerning human reproduction, sexuality and relationships.

The City as Technology in Tokyo

NextNature.net
August 24th 2017
Are cities in their current form really the future of the human habitat? What is a next nature version of the city and how would it look like? In line with this perspective, NNN designer Hendrik-Jan Grievink led two workshops in Tokyo.
WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [tag] => nextnature-workshop [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => )[query_vars] => Array ( [tag] => nextnature-workshop [post_type] => post [post_status] => publish [orderby] => date [order] => DESC [category__not_in] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[numberposts] => 10 [suppress_filters] => [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [cat] => [tag_id] => 75555 [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( )[category__and] => Array ( )[post__in] => Array ( )[post__not_in] => Array ( )[post_name__in] => Array ( )[tag__in] => Array ( )[tag__not_in] => Array ( )[tag__and] => Array ( )[tag_slug__in] => Array ( [0] => nextnature-workshop )[tag_slug__and] => Array ( )[post_parent__in] => Array ( )[post_parent__not_in] => Array ( )[author__in] => Array ( )[author__not_in] => Array ( )[ignore_sticky_posts] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => )[tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => category [terms] => Array ( [0] => 1 )[field] => term_id [operator] => NOT IN [include_children] => )[1] => Array ( [taxonomy] => post_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => nextnature-workshop )[field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ))[relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships )[queried_terms] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => nextnature-workshop )[field] => slug ))[primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID )[meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( )[relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( )[clauses:protected] => Array ( )[has_or_relation:protected] => )[date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 75555 [name] => Nextnature Workshop [slug] => nextnature-workshop [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 1529 [taxonomy] => post_tag [description] => [parent] => 0 [count] => 11 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0 )[queried_object_id] => 75555 [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT object_id FROM wp_term_relationships WHERE term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1529) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 113056 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2019-08-13 08:00:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-13 07:00:12 [post_content] =>

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

In the late nineties, the Tamagotchi egg was released. A small egg-shaped device that contained a digital creature that the owner had to ‘breed’ and take care of. The toy somehow normalized the experience of having some digital device in your pocket that sometimes seems to live a life of its own and that needs your attention. A lot of attention. It was around the same time that the first mobile phones entered the market. Coincidence?

How technology enters our life

Technologies don’t enter our lives just by themselves. They are envisioned, developed, tested and marketed with other technologies in mind. They are designed to coexist with other technologies or aim to disrupt whole industries.

When a technology becomes applied (and available for mainstream audiences), it moves from the ‘operational’ level of the Pyramid of Technology to the ‘applied’. It enters the habitat of the user, usually a human being (although not necessarily).

Visualization of the Pyramid of Technology

This happens in various ways: from becoming commercially available on the market (such as consumer electronics) or being given away for free (as with open source software), to be imposed by government and industries (think infrastructures).

The following steps will help you formulate a vision for how your technology may enter the human habitat.

Do it yourself!

  • Describe how a technology will enter the human habitat. Does this happen voluntarily or imposed? Commercially or for free? Will its entrance be smooth or rough?
  • Sharpen your thoughts in as much detail as possible and ask youself, at which price point will the technology be introduced? And who will be the early adopters?
  • Create a timeline of events you foresee happening.

Your next (nature) design tool

The Pyramid of Technology toolkit is our conceptual navigation tool that visualizes how technology becomes nature. The box contains 70 cards with insights, exercizes and questions to help you dream, build and live in your next nature. Visit the Next Nature Academy and learn more about our workshops, methods and tools.

[post_title] => Q: How will a technology enter the human habitat? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-will-a-technology-enter-the-human-habitat [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-13 09:53:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-13 08:53:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=113056 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 113076 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2019-07-18 12:00:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-18 11:00:52 [post_content] =>

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

The first computers barely fit in your living room. This all changed with the introduction of the desktop computer which sits, well, on your desk. The laptop is designed to live on your lap and your smartphone is made to live in your pocket (but has more computing power than that first computer). One conclusion could be that while computing power increases, the sizes of computers shrink — and they creep up closer to our bodies.

In the future, will you accept a super computer as a tooth implant?

We can only imagine what next generations in this evolutairy path would look like. We can talk about ‘what’ technology is, ‘how’ it works and ‘why’ we need it, but more and more, we should ask ourselves ‘where’ it is (or could be).

The following steps will help you formulate a vision for the inner/outer bodily experience of your technology.

Do it yourself!

  • Describe where your technology currently resides.
  • Think about where else it could be, and how it would be applied on the moon, on the southpole, around your wrist or in the retina of your eyes.
  • Discuss technology as located inside the body. How acceptable or ‘natural’ is this idea to you?
  • Share your thoughts below!

Your next (nature) design tool

The Pyramid of Technology toolkit is our conceptual navigation tool that visualizes how technology becomes nature. The box contains 70 cards with insights, exercizes and questions to help you dream, build and live in your next nature. Visit the Next Nature Academy and learn more about our workshops, methods and tools.

[post_title] => Q: Is the technology outside or inside your body? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => is-the-technology-outside-or-inside-your-body [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-11 16:15:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-11 15:15:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=113076 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 113067 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2019-07-11 12:00:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-11 11:00:53 [post_content] =>

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

Take a mundane object from your house. Now ask yourself: How will this particular technology enchant me? Household objects we find mundane now, once enchanted people — why?

Arthur C. Clarke stated that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”. Think about it, your smartphone is basically a black box that allows you to connect with your grandmother on the other side of the planet, as if through magical interaction.

What if we would envision the magic potential of new technologies? Wouldn’t our relationship with them become much more spiritual?

The following steps will help you formulate a vision for your enchanted technology.

Do it yourself!

  • Describe a technology as if it were a magical object.
  • Put effort into describing all the ways in which it has the potential to enchant people, do this in as much detail as possible.
  • Try to picture a world in which this technology is not thought of as magical. What would need to happen today to get us there tomorrow?
  • Make a list of all the magical features that could be implemented in your next design.
  • Now go do it.

Your next (nature) design tool

The Pyramid of Technology toolkit is our conceptual navigation tool that visualizes how technology becomes nature. The box contains 70 cards with insights, exercizes and questions to help you dream, build and live in your next nature. Visit the Next Nature Academy and learn more about our workshops, methods and tools.

[post_title] => Q: How will technology enchant us? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-will-technology-enchant-us [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-11 15:51:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-11 14:51:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=113067 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 82102 [post_author] => 1666 [post_date] => 2018-06-26 11:10:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-26 10:10:57 [post_content] => Color-blind artist Neil Harbisson designed a brain-implanted antenna that converts colors into sound. This enables him to hear colors he cannot see, and extends his vision to ultraviolets and infrareds. As technology is rapidly advancing, and the boundaries between the body and technology are blurred and ambiguous, it seems plausible that humans will use technologies not only to enhance, but also to extend their physical capabilities.Of course, glasses and hearing-aids are technologies that are already commonly used to make up for sensory impairments. But what would happen if we take this a step further and, like Neil Harbisson, envision new technologies that cooperate with our body to create new senses that go beyond our current physical capabilities? If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose?[caption id="attachment_82181" align="alignnone" width="640"] Meet Hackers & Designers Juliette and Andre.[/caption]

Next Nature Lab: Next Senses

These questions were recently explored during the workshop 'Prototyping Next Senses'; a joint effort with NNN fellow Leanne Wijnsma and Amsterdam-based designer collective Hackers & Designers to challenge, reconceptualize and design human perception.Inspired by the specific qualities of animals and how they perceive the world, participants discussed the senses that they would like to possess. Frogs are for example able to absorb oxygen through their skin, elephants are sensitive to earthly vibrations and use them to communicate, bees are able to process ultraviolet light and sharks have the ability to sense electricity. Encouraged by the hands-on mentality of Hackers & Designers, the participants then started to deconstruct existing technological objects and use the materials to prototype new senses.[caption id="attachment_82182" align="alignnone" width="480"] Participant Stef envisioned Froxygen; this would enable humans to breathe and filter oxygen through their skin and spare the lungs of polluted air.[/caption]

Speculative futures, tangible prototypes

One of the prototypes created during the day was a wearable lightsource that sheds light on human emotions, and displays them to people who have trouble reading emotions and facial expressions of others, such as people on the autistic spectrum. This prototype started an interesting discussion regarding the relation between facial expressions and actual emotions. Are all emotions necessarily visible on the face? People who have trouble expressing their emotions could use the help of sensors connected to their heart rate and temperature, which became a new prototype. Based on the physical indicators of mood, a colored light could express feelings and even extend the experience of emotions beyond the existing human facial expressions.The skin of the frog inspired another group to prototype a similar skin for humans (pictured above). The Froxygen would enable humans to breathe and filter oxygen through their skin and spare the lungs of polluted air. This could be designed as a cyborg-like fashion statement, or invisibly integrated into the clothes that already are an accepted technology.Another group was inspired by pigs, who use their nose to dig through soil and sense the presence of plant-based food (pictured below). Wouldn’t it be great to sense the presence and exact contents of food without having to check the endless lists of ingredients? Using the simple yet vital technology of a fork, they prototyped a shapeshifting ‘sensible’ fork. The fork softens and becomes useless when it senses animal-based products, while it becomes functional when it senses plant-based food.[caption id="attachment_82184" align="alignnone" width="640"] At the end of the day all participants gathered around the physical model of The Pyramid of Technology.[/caption]

The Pyramid of Technology

Alongside Next Nature’s Pyramid of Technology, we started discussing if and how the envisioned senses could be made operational, applied and accepted. For instance, why did the Google Glass that extended our vision never make it to the accepted phase? Would people actually wear a frog-like skin, or use a sensible fork at dinner? Probably - and unfortunately -  most of these prototypes will probably remain in the envisioned stage for now, but they certainly are great conversation-starters already.The Next Nature workshop offered a platform for the exploratory thinking exhibited above. The aim for some participants was to imagine more speculative, or futuristic designs: “I want to master future-thinking”. Many wondered how to ensure this more forward thinking. How to alleviate the boundaries of our current ideas of technologies, which may limit envisioning process to the ‘knowns’ and target groups of today. One participant mentioned: “It is difficult to think creatively about technology, you quickly fall back on the technologies you already know”The Pyramid of Technology is the next nature tool to facilitate this process. Would you like to attend, or host such a workshop? Well, we recently started the NNN Academy! Through interactive workshops, we explore what it means to build, design, and live in the next nature. Facilitated by our Pyramid of Technology Toolkit, and led by a trained NNN guide, the workshops offer a new way to discuss technology, facilitate brainstorms and catalyze innovative processes. Want to know more? Then visit this page! [post_title] => If you could have another sense, which sense would you choose? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => prototyping-next-senses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-28 14:20:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-28 13:20:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=82102 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81853 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-06-12 09:00:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-12 08:00:18 [post_content] => Are you working on projects where technology and human interaction are involved, and are you looking for a new approach? As of today, we offer a brand new workshop concept for you and your team. In just two hours you learn how to work with the Pyramid of Technology toolbox in an active, dynamic and 100% analogue way!

Why this workshop?

Today, everybody uses technology to some extent, yet most of us are unaware of how technologies are introduced, accepted or discarded within our society. Therefore, this 2-hour dynamic crash course helps you to better understand and discuss technology. It facilitates creative brainstorming and catalyses your innovation processes. This enables you to apply the toolkit afterwards in team meetings and projects where a human-centered and future forward approach to technology is needed.
‘The Pyramid of Technology toolkit visualizes how technology becomes nature and how this impacts people’s future lifestyles.’

No screens involved!

A trainer from the Next Nature Network will visit your team on your location preference, and will facilitate the workshop using the Pyramid of Technology toolbox. The trainer explains the Next Nature vision and guides your team through the pyramid by using the various cards from the box: This workshop is active, dynamic and 100% analogue. [caption id="attachment_74170" align="aligncenter" width="1654"] Use the toolbox yourself and experience at first hand how the method works[/caption]

Global outline

  • Work with the Pyramid of Technology toolbox
  • Learning-by-doing: A hands-on experience
  • Guidance by a Next Nature Network trainer
  • One Pyramid-of-Technology box included

After this workshop

  • You will have new angles to generate ideas from
  • You have experienced working with the Pyramid of Technology
  • You can use the toolbox for your own technology related projects
[caption id="attachment_81856" align="alignnone" width="4001"]10 insight cards about technology dynamics, 10 workshop cards with ready-to-go excersizes and 70 yards with challenging questions about nature and technology A pyramid of technology toolbox features 10 insight cards about technology dynamics, 10 workshop cards with ready-to-go excercises and 70 cards with challenging questions about nature and technology[/caption]

Is this for my team?

This crash course is interesting for all teams who work in areas where technology and human interaction are involved, and who seek inspiration for new approaches. This workshop is suitable for corporate teams, as well as teams at design studios; from designers to project managers to lecturers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, researchers and strategists.

Practical information

  • Duration: 2 hours
  • Participants: 10 (max.)
  • Location: at your preferred location
  • Language: English or Dutch
  • Price: €499,– (excl VAT and based on a location in the Netherlands)
  • Includes one Pyramid-of-Technology box (retail price €150,-)

Book this workshop

If you are interested in hosting a workshop-in-a-box session with your team, send an email to workshops [at] nextnature [dot] net.

Do you want more information?

Read more about the workshop on this page, about the Pyramid of Technology on this page or feel free to contact us at any given time.  [post_title] => Next Nature Academy presents: A workshop-in-a-box for your team [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => next-nature-academy-workshop [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-26 11:34:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-26 10:34:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81853 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81372 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-04-16 10:33:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-16 09:33:40 [post_content] => Calling all bloggers! We’d love to have you on board for the 2018 Border Sessions festival in The Hague (NL). Join our team for behind-the-scenes access to festival events.To apply, send us a 500 word or less letter of interest to ruben[at]nextnature[dot]net — be sure to include: • Your availability between 13 - 16 June • Areas of the festival you’d like to coverWe’re looking forward to hearing from you! [post_title] => Next Nature Network x Border Sessions:
Calling for festival bloggers! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => call-for-festival-bloggers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-19 11:47:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-19 10:47:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81372 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 78697 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-11-23 07:00:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-23 05:00:03 [post_content] => Hello next nature explorers! Are you looking for exciting opportunities to learn more about the Next Nature methodology? The Next Nature Academy offers the philosophy, the tools and the methods that will shift the way you think about nature and technology. We do this through inspiring lectures and interactive workshops, both open-call and in-house, for people and organizations.For more information about the Next Nature Academy, visit this page. [post_title] => NEW: Next Nature Academy [post_excerpt] => The Next Nature Academy offers the philosophy, the tools and the methods that will shift the way you think about nature and technology. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => next-nature-academy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-27 10:22:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-27 08:22:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=78697/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 75140 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-09-24 10:13:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-24 08:13:49 [post_content] => Are you looking for a stimulating way to explore technology, facilitate brainstorming and catalyze innovative processes? We've got you covered! NNN organizes workshops using the Pyramid of Technology approach (visualizing how technology becomes nature in seven steps) to help us dream, build and live in our next nature - the nature caused by humans.We launched the Pyramid of Technology workshop at this year's edition of What Design Can Do. The participants were divided into seven groups, each group dove into one of the seven stages of the Pyramid and explored it using the questions contained in the toolkit, such as: which family does this technology belong to? And how will it evolve?NNN workshops are based on our newly developed toolkit and feature a physical model of the pyramid. The content of these sessions is built around the next nature concept and related themes, but can as well be tailored to specific needs. For more information about our workshops, have a look at this page. Want to read more about the project? Then visit this page. Do you prefer to autonomously organize your own workshop? You can order the toolkit from our web shop. [post_title] => Do a Next Nature Workshop! [post_excerpt] => NNN organizes workshops using a physical Pyramid of Technology as conceptual tool. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => next-nature-workshop [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=75140/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 76984 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-08-31 10:00:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-31 08:00:20 [post_content] => On August 8, NNN gave a workshop at BioClub Tokyo, a weekly event held at the FabCafé in Shibuya. Hendrik-Jan Grievink, designer and initiator of the Ectogenesis, Artificial Womb, Human Egg project, shared some insights on the future of technologies concerning human reproduction, sexuality and relationships. An interested group of 25 showed up and discussed the desirability (and possible implications) of assisted reproductive technologies, such as the artificial womb.One of the participants brought a fascinating dilemma up. "Let's suppose that you want to have children, but you are unable to have them yourself, and that you have the opportunity to gestate a child in an artificial womb. Would you choose that possibility over opting for a surrogate mother?". This raised an interesting question: is it more ethical to grow a fetus in an ‘artificial’ environment, or to use (and to a certain extend to exploit) the biological environment of another person’s body? Against expectations, the participants were roughly divided on a fifty-fifty basis, which originated a lively debate. During the workshop, the group confronted with another stimulating topic of discussion: how do we define what makes a ‘human’? A pretty difficult one, this one. What would you say?Special thanks to BioClub organizers Georg Tremmel and Chiaki Ishizuka for giving us the opportunity to present our research to a new audience. Would you be interested in hosting a similar event or book an inspiring workshop? Contact us at workshops[at]nextnature.net. [post_title] => Artificial Womb Workshop at BioClub Tokyo [post_excerpt] => On August 8, NNN gave a workshop at BioClub Tokyo to share some insights on the future of technologies concerning human reproduction, sexuality and relationships. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => artificial-womb-workshop-bioclub-tokyo [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-14 14:02:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-14 13:02:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=76984/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 76873 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-08-24 10:00:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-24 08:00:01 [post_content] => Cities might be the most advanced technology mankind has produced so far. A decade ago the tipping point was reached when more people lived in urban environments than in non-urban ones. But are cities in their current form really the future of the human habitat? What is a next nature version of the city and how would it look like? In line with this perspective, NNN designer Hendrik-Jan Grievink led two workshops in Tokyo, Japan.The Pyramid of Technology concept facilitated the exploration on various levels, making use of ‘design probes’: rapidly prototyped thought-provoking objects that convey an idea or a design concept. What worked really well, was that the design probes were generated as some kind of materialized, conceptual answers to the concrete questions from the 70 question cards in the Pyramid of Technology toolkit.Among the results from the workshop, we'd like to share the concept developed by Nicole Jansen who envisioned a new destination for the Yamanote Line, one of Tokyo’s most important subway lines. She would transform it into an underground capsule city for office workers. In this scenario, commuting would be an unnecessary activity replaced by a lifestyle that is facilitated through a modular system of living pods and plug-in facilities. This concept originated from the observation that the amount of people passing through Tokyo’s subway system is so large that the city could never accommodate their needs in case they would all come above ground at the same time (for example, during an earthquake or a flood).[caption id="attachment_76880" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Building design probes based on questions from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit and arranging them on the Pyramid of Technology to inquire new patterns of meaning.[/caption]The workshop was part of the Summer Sessions, a mobile summer school program organized by GDA (Graphic Design Arnhem of ArtEZ University of the Arts), a four year BA program in graphic design where Hendrik-Jan Grievink teaches design research.Do you want to stay up to date about NNN workshops and other NNN projects? Make sure to join Next Nature Network and never miss a thing! [mc4wp_form id="72385"] [post_title] => The City as Technology in Tokyo [post_excerpt] => Are cities in their current form really the future of the human habitat? What is a next nature version of the city and how would it look like? In line with this perspective, NNN designer Hendrik-Jan Grievink led two workshops in Tokyo. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => workshop-exploring-city-technology [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-29 10:13:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-29 08:13:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=76873/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 113056 [post_author] => 7 [post_date] => 2019-08-13 08:00:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-13 07:00:12 [post_content] =>

This question is an excerpt from the Pyramid of Technology toolkit

In the late nineties, the Tamagotchi egg was released. A small egg-shaped device that contained a digital creature that the owner had to ‘breed’ and take care of. The toy somehow normalized the experience of having some digital device in your pocket that sometimes seems to live a life of its own and that needs your attention. A lot of attention. It was around the same time that the first mobile phones entered the market. Coincidence?

How technology enters our life

Technologies don’t enter our lives just by themselves. They are envisioned, developed, tested and marketed with other technologies in mind. They are designed to coexist with other technologies or aim to disrupt whole industries.

When a technology becomes applied (and available for mainstream audiences), it moves from the ‘operational’ level of the Pyramid of Technology to the ‘applied’. It enters the habitat of the user, usually a human being (although not necessarily).

Visualization of the Pyramid of Technology

This happens in various ways: from becoming commercially available on the market (such as consumer electronics) or being given away for free (as with open source software), to be imposed by government and industries (think infrastructures).

The following steps will help you formulate a vision for how your technology may enter the human habitat.

Do it yourself!

  • Describe how a technology will enter the human habitat. Does this happen voluntarily or imposed? Commercially or for free? Will its entrance be smooth or rough?
  • Sharpen your thoughts in as much detail as possible and ask youself, at which price point will the technology be introduced? And who will be the early adopters?
  • Create a timeline of events you foresee happening.

Your next (nature) design tool

The Pyramid of Technology toolkit is our conceptual navigation tool that visualizes how technology becomes nature. The box contains 70 cards with insights, exercizes and questions to help you dream, build and live in your next nature. Visit the Next Nature Academy and learn more about our workshops, methods and tools.

[post_title] => Q: How will a technology enter the human habitat? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-will-a-technology-enter-the-human-habitat [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-13 09:53:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-13 08:53:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=113056 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 10 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 42180a7e73a14d01ce9cbb09bfa7f457 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed )[compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ))
load more