103 results for “Meat the Future”

Next Nature XL showcase in China: in pictures

NextNature.net
November 7th 2019

We are proud to invite you to our largest showcase (so far), currently on display at OCT Art & Design in Shenzhen, China. Spanning across three floors, with a total surface of 1200 m2, this exhibition truly is a Next Nature showcase extraordinaire. From our Bistro In Vitro to HUBOT and the NANO Supermarket, to the Habitat VR; this is where you get to experience your favourite Next Nature projects in a completely new light!

Curious? Good! Get a first …

Pack your bags and join us for the largest Next Nature showcase (yet) in China

NextNature.net
October 3rd 2019

To our Chinese friends (and beyond)! From 2 November 2019 to 1 February 2020, we'll be crossing the globe for a large showcase at the OCT Art and Design Gallery in Shenzhen, China. The gallery is a groundbreaking institution that present vanguard works at the cutting edge of design practice—making Next Nature the perfect fit.

Our job agency for humans and robots, HUBOT, the NANO Supermarket that showcases a series products from the future you cannot buy (yet), our in …

Artificial ceramic bones for a natural meat experience

Ruben Baart
March 22nd 2019

The world is developing, climate change is happening and it's time for us to do something. Now.

One strategy would be to simply stop eating meat — or at least reduce the amount of our consumption. “Why?”, you may think. Well here are some numbers: If you do not eat meat for a week as an adult, you save 130 liters of water, 76 kilometres of driving a car and 770 grams of animal meat.

Sure, some people may find …

Taco futures: In vitro meat in Mexico City

Alejandro Alvarez
February 21st 2019

Our In Vitro Meat Cookbook has inspired many people around the world. Just recently, we had the BBC over at our headquarters to see what makes us thick.

This idea of in vitro meat certainly is — at least for now — an elaborate portion of food for thought (meat oyster anyone?). And with this in mind, the alumni of Tecnológico de Monterrey university, Mexico City, challenged themselves to speculate on possible (local) futures for in vitro meat and boil …

Why insects are not the new sushi

Jonas House
October 16th 2018

People across the world have been eating insects for thousands of years. We know that approximately 2,000 species are edible and that these insects are eaten in many different ways. The exception to this is the Western world, where insects are not a traditional food. This may be attributed to the fact that merely two per cent of edible insects occur naturally in Europe in comparison to the larger variety available in Asia, Africa and South America.…

How in vitro meat became a subject of debate in the Dutch parliament

Ruben Baart
September 26th 2018

To all in vitro meat optimists, hear hear! In May 2018 we launched the petition 'In vitro meat is here. Let us taste it.' We proudly announce that this petition led to parliamentary questions, followed by a roundtable discussion with members of the Dutch parliament (which took place today). Prior to this debate, we were invited to hand over our petition - which was signed by 3282 people, thank you! - to the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, …

In vitro meat is here! But we are not allowed to taste it

NextNature.net
May 22nd 2018

Previously we predicted that we would be eating in vitro meat by 2028. But as it turns out... In vitro meat is already here! And we are not allowed to eat it. The meat has been sealed by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, under new European 'Novel Foods' legislation. This means that we cannot test it. Therefore, we started a petition. We want to taste this in vitro meat at our own risk. Sign if you want …

‘I volunteer myself to try this cultured meat at my own risk’

Van Mensvoort
May 22nd 2018

The Netherlands leads in cheese, clogs, and cultured meat. This sustainable and animal-friendly form of meat has largely been developed in our country. In 1997, Willem van Eelen obtained the first patent on the technique, whereby animal cells are grown into muscle tissue without any animals needing to be slaughtered…

How the Dutch government is obstructing the advent of in vitro meat

Ruben Baart
May 22nd 2018

In 2017, two years after her father died, Ira van Eelen decided to call the Dutch Arable Farming Union. She couldn't help but wonder how come the Netherlands was still not leading the next food revolution.…

Watch Koert’s TED Talk on Meat the Future

NextNature.net
December 26th 2017
We need to talk about the future of meat! Watch Next Nature Network director Koert van Mensvoort's TED talk on Meat the Future.
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We are proud to invite you to our largest showcase (so far), currently on display at OCT Art & Design in Shenzhen, China. Spanning across three floors, with a total surface of 1200 m2, this exhibition truly is a Next Nature showcase extraordinaire. From our Bistro In Vitro to HUBOT and the NANO Supermarket, to the Habitat VR; this is where you get to experience your favourite Next Nature projects in a completely new light!

Curious? Good! Get a first peek at the exhibition below.

A virtual tour, in pictures

Habitat VR

The Next Nature Habitat explores how we want to live in the near future. What does it mean to live in a next nature?

Bistro In Vitro

Our Bistro In Vitro presents 30 speculative recipes with lab-grown meat that could end up on your plate one day; street food-style!

NANO Supermarket

At the NANO Supermarket, you'll get the chance to see and interact with speculative products that may hit the shelves in the next ten years. Innovative and beautiful, uncanny and disturbing, but always specifically designed to provoke discussion, the products provide us with thought-provoking scenarios that help us decide what future we actually want.

HUBOT

The robots are coming! They are getting smarter, cheaper and more reliable. How long will I have my job before a robot steals it? The industrial revolution made muscular power redundant, the digital revolution automates our thinking. How to cope with that? Are we working against, or with the robot? HUBOT is world's first job agency for people and robots.

Pyramid of Technology

On the third floor, you'll find a workshop space fully dedicated to our Pyramid of Technology, the ultimate conceptual tool to visualize how technology becomes nature and what we can learn from that. It helps us to dream, build and live in our next nature — the nature caused by humans.

Meet the team

Let us give us give a round of applause to our dream team!

Plan your visit

What? Next Nature showcase XL
When? The expo runs until 1 February 2020
Where? OCT Art and Design Gallery, Shenzen, China

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To our Chinese friends (and beyond)! From 2 November 2019 to 1 February 2020, we'll be crossing the globe for a large showcase at the OCT Art and Design Gallery in Shenzhen, China. The gallery is a groundbreaking institution that present vanguard works at the cutting edge of design practice—making Next Nature the perfect fit.

Our job agency for humans and robots, HUBOT, the NANO Supermarket that showcases a series products from the future you cannot buy (yet), our in vitro meat restaurant Meat the Future and Habitat VR will transform the gallery into an incubator for radical new ideas and discussions about our future – in which nature and technology are fusing.

From meat flavored ice cream to custom-grown organs, as always, our exhibits will push your boundaries and spark the technology debate. Moreover, a workshop space will be installed where our Pyramid of Technology commands the room. Here, visitors will gain the chance to learn and reflect on the ideas presented inside the exhibition in a constructive manner, and have meaningfull conversations to take home.

Spanning across three floors, this exhibition truly is a Next Nature takeover. We are curious to see what kind of perspectives emerge when our discussion-stimulating scenarios take hold of imaginations 5,745 miles away... 

Stay tuned!

What? Next Nature overview exhibition
When? From 2 November 2019 - 1 February 2020
Where? OCT Art and Design Gallery, Shenzen, China

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The world is developing, climate change is happening and it's time for us to do something. Now.

One strategy would be to simply stop eating meat — or at least reduce the amount of our consumption. “Why?”, you may think. Well here are some numbers: If you do not eat meat for a week as an adult, you save 130 liters of water, 76 kilometres of driving a car and 770 grams of animal meat.

Sure, some people may find it to be hard to stop eating meat, yet there are innovative solutions on its way that may help you overcome the inconvenience of not eating meat. Like eating in vitro meat!

Grown in bioreactors from animal cells, in vitro meat could be a sustainable and humane alternative to raising a whole animal from birth to slaughter. The first lab-grown hamburger is already here, but in vitro meat technology could also bring us entirely new culinary experiences.

A future scenario

One of these experiences would be to eat from an artificial ceramic bone — for a natural meat experience. And while it may sound farfetched for now, there's one designer living ahead of us in envisioning such a future.

Meet Yossi Roth, industrial designer based in Jerusalem, Israel. In his latest project, Future Carnivore, he imagined a scenario in which in-vitro meat has become the norm.

As the slaughtering of animals is out of the equation, it's no longer possible to nibble the remaining bits from the bone. And that's where his project steps in.

These bone-shaped ceramics emphasise on the gap "between the brutality of slaughtering an animal for our food, as on the sterile process of growing meat inside a lab." Roth's eating utensils remind us what savage hunters we once were — or perhaps, still are.

We recently caught up with Roth to discuss the future of meat, how to market such a product, and why industrial designers may be the next butchers.

Tell us a bit about the project, Future Carnivore.

For Future Carnivore I imagined a scenario in which in-vitro meat has become the main source of protein. A future where animal meat is no longer needed. How will everyday events like family meals, cooking or buying meat look like? Today when we go to the butcher and look at the selection of meat we see a lot of dead animals cuts, bleeding red, inner organs, fat and bones… Sounds disgusting, doesn't it? But somehow we've gotten OK with it. No longer do we hesitate to buy the most beautiful dead piece of animal; it has become natural to us to do so.

The objects I created are artificial ceramic bones. They function as tools for eating and cooking meat. The bones are a reminder of the animal we used to kill in the 'past'. They are here to remind us what savage hunters we were, and how we shouldn’t stray from the path of finding more viable solutions to consume protein — while maintaining a ecological balance on our planet. The bone acts as heat vessel to disperse heat through the meat in the cooking process. In addition it adds weight and visual appearance.

What were the first reactions to the project?

In-vitro meat still seems like sci-fi to some people, even though it's literally here. People who saw the project, told me they gained a better understand towards the advent of in-vitro meat. My intention was to confront the viewers with the brutal way we are consuming meat today, in which I succeeded: When people were holding and using the artificial bone, this idea of holding and eating from a real bone suddenly seemed violent, brutal and even absurd.

Why did you choose for a 'bone' as your medium (as opposed to a different not-animal-related tool)?

Consider this, our hunter-gatherer ancestors used every part of the animal; for food, clothes and tools. With that, the animal bones were used for tool making, hunting, utensils and jewellery. I’ve chosen to use the bone to emphasise the major contrast between the time periods, between the brutal act of killing an animal, and the sterile process of growing meat in a lab.

The bone as such, plays an important role in our experience with meat. I mean, we use it for cooking, we hold the bone while eating, and it gives weight, flavor, heat etc. I used the bone as a gesture and reminder to better remind ourselves where it (and we) came from. The bone says a lot about us, our culture and history.

You could compare it to the shutter sound on our phone; the shutter does not need to make this sound no more, but it does help us understand its function.

Do you eat meat yourself?

I experimented with vegetarianism for couple of years in the past, but only after a few years I returned to eating meat. Today I eat meat scarcely, mainly due to environmental awareness and the problem of meat farms. Yet I have the means in my region to find a cheap and healthy substitute. I believe that many people around the world share this feeling, but experience difficulties to substitute meat (which mainly has to do with its unique flavor and texture).

While researching in-vitro meat, I got very impressed by the advantages of this technology. This led me to think, as a designer, what fascinates me the most is the role of design in this radical revolution. From there I started to wonder how this innovation could affect user experience in the future — which led to the Future Carnivore project.

Do you think that people are ready to stir up an appetite for eating in-vitro meat?

I think we will have to go through a long process until we get used to (the idea of) in-vitro meat — but it's a process that already has begun. Our habits are hard to change, even harder when it comes to our food, and meat in particular. When I asked people whether they’ll try it or not, the majority told me that they would. I guess we are going to see in-vitro meat in the near future, whether we like it or not.

Any thoughts on how we could introduce eating in-vitro to the world at large?

In 2008 the MOMA hosted an exhibition titled “Design and the elastic mind”. The 'elastic' refers to the way we’re accepting and adapting to new ideas and technology. Designers hold to unique opportunity in dealing with and creating this elasticity in our brains. They have the ability to transform science and technology into objects that we can comprehend and use.

I, as a designer, don't know how to make in-vitro meat more tastier, but I can certainly think about the look and feel of the technology. It's not only a matter of taste, the “UX” (user experience) of the meat needs to be dealt with. The experience we have while eating a steak has multiple sensory and emotional factors that add to the overall experience - visual, tactile, smell, weight etc. If we can deeply understand this experience, the introduction can be successfully made.

Are industrial designers the new butchers?

Lol. It is pretty hard to find a job as a designer, so perhaps exploring the field of 'meat design' would be an interesting opportunity...

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Our In Vitro Meat Cookbook has inspired many people around the world. Just recently, we had the BBC over at our headquarters to see what makes us thick.

This idea of in vitro meat certainly is — at least for now — an elaborate portion of food for thought (meat oyster anyone?). And with this in mind, the alumni of Tecnológico de Monterrey university, Mexico City, challenged themselves to speculate on possible (local) futures for in vitro meat and boil up thoughts on how Mexican cuisine may change along the way.

But first

Mexico city is a metropolis with approximately 8.8 million inhabitants. It faces the 'common' problems for any big city: traffic, pollution, overpopulation and delinquency. Yet it stands out for it also faces some 'less common' problems. Think earthquakes, sinking buildings and water shortages.

Each of these issues are rooted in a long history of a series of (bad) decisions that all seemed to lack any future perspective. At that time, building a city over a lake perhaps seemed like a good idea, but today the chilangos (residents of Mexico City, ed.) have to deal with the consequences of such a decision.

Nevertheless, the citizens of Mexico City do enjoy a vibrant culture and all the wicked food flavors this entails. Having that said, foodies in Mexico City will have no problem at all finding the corn, cheese and chilli combos to satisfy their every craving, from the southern Oaxaca to the northernmost Tijuana — let alone the local surprises available at the many street food stands.

These two aspects of the metropolis where addressed during the workshop by the young talents, led by industrial designer Mariana Pedroza from Antefuturo. Working with the Pyramid of Technology toolkit, this creative session resulted in three future-proof scenarios that each show how speculative design holds the ability to deliver fresh insights that may inspire many more to come. Let's dig in.

Scenario 1: Filter

It's 2040 and Mexico City is suffering through an extreme water crisis. Therefore team Filter has envisioned traditional aguas frescas (fruits water) — but with a twist.

At their street stand, they are turning urine into water. Here's how it works: First you go to the special urinals where your urine is analyzed and stored. Based on this analysis, they recommend the adequate drink in order to keep you healthy.

At the bar there are different beverages available, all made from the recycled water of the city sewage, to which you just have contributed.

Scenario 2: Autonomous Street Vendor

It's 2050 and mobility in the city has drastically changed: Cars are no longer taking up all the space, as bicycles have popped up as the standard mode of transport.

As a result, the days of loud food trucks, ice cream vendors or pan dulce sellers are over. Instead, we now have Autonomous Street Vendor Drones: Floating humming drones that substitute the megaphones of food trucks. You'll hear them buzz around town, and you simply take a cycling break to enjoy a hot tamal oaxaqueño. Cheers!

Scenario 3: Meat Biohacking Lab

As emerging technologies drive new business and service models, governments must rapidly create, modify, and enforce regulations — not always in favor of its citizens.

In this scenario, in vitro meat is forbidden in Mexico City due to ill-advised security concerns. However, as the food shortage in many neighbourhoods grows, this has led to the creation of so-called Meat Biohacking Labs: underground facilities where citizens meet to produce (human) in vitro meat for self- consumption.

Pictures and project by Mariana Pedroza

PS: Do you want to organize your own next nature workshop? You can! Drop us a line at academy[at]nextnature[dot]com.

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People across the world have been eating insects for thousands of years. We know that approximately 2,000 species are edible and that these insects are eaten in many different ways. The exception to this is the Western world, where insects are not a traditional food. This may be attributed to the fact that merely two per cent of edible insects occur naturally in Europe in comparison to the larger variety available in Asia, Africa and South America.

Food security

Insects as food became a much-discussed topic around the world when the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations published the report Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security by Wageningen University & Research (WUR) insect expert Arnold van Huis et al. in 2013 which drew considerable media attention. A few years prior to this, insects had already been identified as a new sustainable source of protein for food and animal feeds in the Netherlands in the context of research regarding food security. In the FAO report, the scientists explain the facts regarding the eating and farming of insects. By clarifying the misconceptions about insects, they hoped to make a positive contribution to the development of the sector.

The combination of expertise from WUR and contacts in the business community quickly resulted in the founding of an association for Dutch insect farmers (VENIK). Four varieties of edible insects were marketed: mealworms and buffalo worms, house crickets and grasshoppers.

Novel food

Despite the extensive publicity and efforts, people are not lining up to eat insects. It turned out not to be ‘the new sushi’ as many had expected it to be. After all, sushi was also once considered novel food and has since become widely accepted. To discover the reason for this, sociologist and social geographer Jonas House from WUR analysed why sushi gained a foothold in the USA in the 1960s, long before its introduction in the Netherlands. He compared the acceptance of sushi there with the introduction of edible insects in the Netherlands. House is interested in changes in diet, which factors lead to the successful introduction of new foods and what makes people consider something to be edible.

The role of Japanese restaurants

The introduction of sushi in the USA happened via Japanese restaurants. The restaurants created sushi bars that were also found in Japan. Here you’d sit on high bar stools and watch as the chef created small, artistic dishes; a concept that was entirely new to the country. The restaurants simply bought the ingredients at the wholesale, while the chefs were flown in.

This was a time when going out to eat became more popular. Japanese businessmen took their Western colleagues to taste these exquisite dishes and, as many Hollywood films were being filmed in Japan, the jet set also became familiar with the food. According to House, this also imbued sushi with a symbolic meaning as being something authentic that you could use to distinguish yourself. This is exactly what the metropolitan elite did and this, in turn, led to the anchoring of sushi in Western society.

Farmability

Up until now, the introduction of insects in the Netherlands has not met with the same success. There are no foreigners who are introducing eating insects as part of their own food culture and no African or Asian restaurants which are putting insects on their menu.

In the Netherlands, the first insects to be brought onto the market were easy to farm and had already been used as animal feed. This was followed by the development of products and recipes to encourage their consumption. Insects are being processed in hamburgers which are marketed as substitutes for meat. However, these are more expensive than vegetarian burgers and don’t taste all that different while there tends to be an air of secrecy around it reminiscent of the adding of horse meat to beef sausages. They are also sold freeze-dried, which is unique to the Netherlands, and sold predominantly online. This is more common for food in the Netherlands but not so for speciality shops.

Not distinctive enough

So what it is about insects that sets them apart? ‘The how, what, where and why of food influences what we eat. Firstly, there is no history of eating insects and secondly people didn’t introduce the practice in the Netherlands,’ explains House. ‘If you then hide insects in food like hamburgers, it simply becomes yet another alternative for beef. They’re not distinctive enough in terms of taste or appearance. The insect products available in the Netherlands have little exceptional taste or appearance which means that it lacks a trendy image or status as a delicacy; they simply don’t have the wow-factor. They lack an authentic cuisine.’

Simply being available in supermarkets might lend them the label of being edible, but that doesn’t automatically mean that people will start eating it regularly. Stinging nettles and ground elder are also edible, yet people aren’t going out en masse to harvest them.

Flavour

According to House, if you want to successfully introduce a new type of food, you should not focus on removing barriers, the rational resistance, such as the yuck-factor for insects. The low level of acceptance for insects as food is not the result of a cultural barrier. After all, we started eating sushi. ‘If the flavour of the food is not deciding, it’s likely to fail.’

‘To try and make something new like edible insects acceptable, you need to focus on their preparation, on the culinary element. Food is essentially about how tasty it is, so the flavour and appearance needs to be good. This was the same for the introduction of sugar and tea, where pioneers prepared the way for the masses.’

This story originally appeared on the Wageningen University & Research blog. Read the original piece here.

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To all in vitro meat optimists, hear hear! In May 2018 we launched the petition 'In vitro meat is here. Let us taste it.' We proudly announce that this petition led to parliamentary questions, followed by a roundtable discussion with members of the Dutch parliament (which took place today). Prior to this debate, we were invited to hand over our petition - which was signed by 3282 people, thank you! - to the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, and with that, briefly share our viewpoints on in vitro meat in the Netherlands; today, tomorrow, and beyond.

The start of a petition

In vitro meat is a sustainable and animal-friendly alternative to traditional meat. In January 2018, the first trial packages were deliverd to the Netherlands. We wanted to taste it, but we were not allowed. And we started a petition. Allow us to refresh your memory:

We observed

And requested

  • That the tasting of the in vitro meat can take place.
  • For the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority to take an active stance by testing the trial packages of in vitro meat.
  • That the government will do everything in its power to establish the Netherlands as a place where sustainable innovations (such as in vitro meat) can not only be conceived but can also introduced!
NNN director Koert van Mensvoort ready to hand over the petition!
The moment. In order of appearance: Tjeerd de Groot (D66), Koert van Mensvoort (NNN), Martijn van Helvert (CDA), Laura Bromet (GroenLinks), Arne Weverling (VVD), Maurits von Martels (CDA).

A round table

Besides the members of parliament, a number of scientists, entrepreneurs, philosophers and social influencers were asked to join the debate and present their views on in vitro meat. Given, we're taking baby steps here, but the MP meeting is certainly a step forward, and all yesterday's attendees seemed to agree on that one.

The session was split up in three blocks - science, business and society - that do so much to help inform and stimulate debate around the table. In the following, we'll take a closer look at what's to come next.

Meat is a cultural artefact

"Meat is an intrinsic part of the modern diet," says Daan Luining, research division director at CAS (Cellular Agriculture Society). In his words: "Meat is more than just proteins: it's (part of our) culture."

In a recent estimate of the number of vegetarians in the world, only 75 million people are vegetarians by choice, a number that will gradually grow with increasing affluence and education. The other 1450 million are vegetarians of necessity. They will start to eat meat as soon as they can afford it.

"Meat has to do with prosperity," says Peter Verstrate, CEO at MosaMeat. "When cultures are becoming wealthier, the first thing the population does is adding meat to their diets - instead of buying new cars."

And then there's the experience of eating meat. Often the desire to eat meat is rooted in habit. According to Verstrate, we are "addicted to meat" - and this may be the core of our problems. "Meat is the holy grail, and producers of vegetable products know this only too well."

At Next Nature Network, we could not agree more, hence our Meat the Future project, exploring the potential and food cultures in vitro meat will bring us - through design. With system change comes behavioral change.

What's in a name?

Lab-grown meat? Cultured meat? In vitro meat? Clean meat? How to name such a product?

Dr. Arnout Fischer, associate professor in consumer behaviour at Wageningen University (WUR), points out that "by naming [it] 'clean meat', consumers may loose their trust in the food industry. It's a great task that lies with the government." Anticipating on his comment, politician Tjeerd de Groot from D66, the social, liberal party wrote a tweet to call upon the Dutch citizens to come up with a name (Thoughts? Let us know in the comments below!).

Fischer has done important research on how consumers think about in vitro meat. He found that the Dutch population holds no objections to the product (be it a 'neutral' stance), but there's also not a real demand for it. Surprisingly, just 5% of the Dutch populace regards in vitro meat as an important opportunity to reach our climate goals.

However, what it comes down to is this. The name should highlight the fact that the product is a meat produce like no other. Just imagine a future where in vitro meat becomes cheaper than 'analogue' meat, and is being sold like the 'real thing'.

The government needs to take a stance

"In vitro meat should come more natural to us," says Ira van Eelen, in vitro meat optimist, marketeer and member of JUST's advisory board. The self-described 'nexitarian' thinks its important that, for society to fully accept the product, we must call a spade a spade: "It's just meat!"

Van Eelen too, feels strongly about the missed opportunity of launching the product in the Netherlands earlier this year. Now, other countries are now taking the lead in this revolution. She points out that worldwide there are about thirty start-ups working on the production of in vitro meat, and The Netherlands are now falling behind.

Due to the European legislation holding off the in vitro meat, this sends a negative message to society, and it's about time we change that. "The government needs to take a stance, and inform citizens in a neutral, subjective way on what the product is and is not."

"The next step is to make it sexy for students to specialize in making in vitro meat instead of becoming a doctor," she adds. Like other entrepreneurs, she calls on the Dutch government to invest in knowledge and education about in vitro meat. "There's a whole new generation of scientists on the rise who will bring this forward." Not back to, but forward to Nature!

Have thoughts? Let us know in the comments below!

[post_title] => How in vitro meat became a subject of debate in the Dutch parliament [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => in-vitro-meat-petition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-10 17:41:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-10 16:41:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91218 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81684 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2018-05-22 12:02:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-22 11:02:04 [post_content] =>
Previously we predicted that we would be eating in vitro meat by 2028. But as it turns out... In vitro meat is already here! And we are not allowed to eat it. The meat has been sealed by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, under new European 'Novel Foods' legislation. This means that we cannot test it. Therefore, we started a petition. We want to taste this in vitro meat at our own risk. Sign if you want to taste in vitro meat.
The problem The Netherlands has been leading the research on in vitro meat for the past 20 years. There has been a patent since 1999 and in 2013 the first lab-grown burger was cooked and eaten. The trial packages are currently in the Netherlands, but are sealed by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority. We want to eat it, but we are not allowed to!The solution The Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority should become an active contributer to innovation by testing the in vitro meat test packages.What can you do? Sign the petition if you agree and also want to taste in vitro meat. [post_title] => In vitro meat is here! But we are not allowed to taste it [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => petition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-11 13:07:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-11 12:07:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81684 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81676 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2018-05-22 12:01:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-22 11:01:51 [post_content] => The Netherlands leads in cheese, clogs, and cultured meat. This sustainable and animal-friendly form of meat has largely been developed in our country. In 1997, Willem van Eelen obtained the first patent on the technique, whereby animal cells are grown into muscle tissue without any animals needing to be slaughteredAt the beginning of this century, the Dutch government invested substantial money into the scientific research being carried out at the universities of Utrecht, Amsterdam, and Eindhoven. In 2013, professor Mark Post of Maastricht University presented the first in vitro burger to the world. From 2011 onwards, I myself researched the possible impact of such technology at the Eindhoven University of Technology, and in 2014 we at Next Nature Network published the first In Vitro Meat Cookbook to stimulate the societal discussion of the future of meat.According to the United Nations, excessive meat consumption constitutes one of the largest environmental problems of our time. Although it’s well-known that global warming is a problem, far fewer people know that meat production is responsible for a significant proportion of the harmful greenhouse gases causing it. If we want to realize the goals of the Paris Agreement, we have to somehow shrink the numbers of our livestock in the coming years, according to a recent report of the Dutch Council for the Environment and Infrastructure. Since not everyone is prepared to immediately turn vegetarian, and since meat consumption in developing economies such as India and China rises with prosperity, we must explore all possible alternatives.Although many people still experience in vitro meat as artificial and unnatural, the manufacturing process is comparable to beer-brewing or cheese-making; both depend on the feeding of cell cultures. The most important difference is that in vitro meat is new, and therefore alien and unusual. Maybe in 2050 it will be perfectly normal to grow a piece of meat in your own kitchen. For the time being, is it “Trust what you know?” Not quite. Research into public willingness to consume in vitro meat reveals that between 40 and 70% of the population are open to trying it or even to making the switch.Because the first in vitro burger cost €250,000 in 2013, this more sustainable and animal-friendly form of meat production can seem like a distant dream. But make no mistake. The first flat-screen televisions were also affordable only to millionaires. Today, almost everyone has one hanging in their bedroom.Meat is a billion-dollar industry around the world. The business that succeeds in serving a portion of this market with in vitro meat will not only contribute to a more sustainable world; there is also the potential to earn a great deal of money. International investors haven’t failed to notice this. At this very moment, various businesses around the world are busy bringing in vitro meat to the market.One of those businesses is the American JUST, which claims to have made cultured nuggets, chorizo meat and even foie gras from animal cells. The CEO of this business, Josh Tetrick, wants to bring his product to market in 2018. Because he recognizes our country’s history with cultured meat, Tetrick recently hosted the first public tasting of in vitro meat at a Dutch restaurant, as well as at the NEMO Science Museum, the idea being to present his product to the world from its point of origin.As an in vitro meat explorer since the beginning, I was invited to the dinner and thrilled to have the chance to try the product. But it never got that far. On the authority of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, an inspector from the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA) came to seal up the packets of cultured meat. Because this product hasn’t yet been approved by the European “Novel Food” legislation, we aren’t allowed to consume it. In reaction to this, the presentation is likely to take place in Asia instead.Give me a break. In the Netherlands, we have played a leading role in this sustainable innovation since day one. The government has invested money in the research. Now that a number of important technical and societal hurdles surrounding the manufacturing process and consumer acceptance have been overcome, that same government is going to raise a legal barrier by forbidding the presentation of the product in the Netherlands.Don’t get me wrong. I understand that cultured meat products must be thoroughly researched and tested before we can offer them to consumers in the supermarket. Is in vitro meat safe? Is it healthy? We all want to know. All those doubts must be addressed before it can go on sale. But you can’t find any of that out if government agencies seal up cultured meat packages before they can be tested at all.The Dutch are known worldwide for our cheese and our delicious light beer. We have a unique chance here to add a new product category to that list. Our government’s ambitious business policy aims to make us into the most creative economy in Europe. We want our innovation and food production to outshine the world. And this is what we do about it?If I may put a request to the government: I want to ask that the NVWA be instructed to lift the seal immediately, and that the government take an active stance by allowing the new food products to be tested as soon as possible. I volunteer myself to try this cultured meat at my own risk. And we’ve started a petition. Sign if you want the opportunity to try it yourself. [post_title] => 'I volunteer myself to try this cultured meat at my own risk' [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => in-vitro-meat-is-here [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81676 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81652 [post_author] => 873 [post_date] => 2018-05-22 12:01:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-22 11:01:37 [post_content] => In 2017, two years after her father died, Ira van Eelen decided to call the Dutch Arable Farming Union. She couldn't help but wonder how come the Netherlands was still not leading the next food revolution.What followed was an unexpected call from Josh Tetrick, the lightning-rod CEO of billion-dollar US food startup JUST (formerly Hampton Creek), who invited her over for a tasting in the kitchen of their laboratory in San Fransisco. From that moment on, things started to move. Quickly.The company bought the patents from her father and took Ira in on the member advisory board to bring her father's dream to the market by the end of 2018. "Being on the market is part of the learning experiment," says Van Eelen, "this is how it becomes real.”Together they spoke with governments in the US, Singapore, China and the Netherlands to explore what leadership in this field looks like. Ira convinced Josh to introduce the meat in the Netherlands due to its background and inherence in the field, and it seemed as if nothing could stop the two in doing so.Ira did her research and learned from the Dutch Arable Farming Union that a business proposal was needed in order to get the dream done. Knowing this, this led her to “behave in an appropriate matter” when offering the Dutch government a proposal to jointly take the lead in a well-orchestrated tasting experiment within the margins of the law.Together with JUST, Ira proposed serving victimless fois gras to the dinner table. “People were already eating fois gras before 1997,” Ira commemorates - this was the year her father initially filed the patent.Whilst setting up arrangements, Van Eelen found three parties (two restaurants in Zaandam and NEMO Science Museum in Amsterdam) that were interested in serving the meat. And so, she updated the Dutch Arable Farming Union about her plans.“The idea was to serve the meat every other two weeks on a small scale with an informed, yet curious audience, to learn and see what people would think of it.” Ira says. “As it is now, we are not able to give people the chance to be involved in the product. Therefore my goal is to take it from the lab and onto the plate.”But unfortunately, it never came that far.

A prisoner of legislation

A first dinner was scheduled to take place on December 28th, 2017. “But then we found that this was not allowed,” Ira tells us. “I called the Dutch Arable Farming Union, as well as the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality for more information. They told us there was a transitional arrangement that ran until 1 January 2018 - the day that the new European novel foods regulation took effect - and on the 23rd of January, they told me that the idea was off the table.”However, as arrangements had been made, the meat arrived in the Netherlands. “Because I had told the Dutch Arable Farming Union about our plans, they felt the need to inform the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA) about it, who in turn - under the rule of this European legislation - have taken the meat into custody,” Ira says. “It has not been confiscated or taken away, but it is sealed. It’s just laying there now.”[caption id="attachment_81702" align="alignnone" width="640"] The sealed sausage, as documented at NEMO Science Museum.[/caption]“I’m not mad,” Ira says, “I’m worried! We missed a unique opportunity to launch this in the Netherlands, as we were able to deliver in 2017. Politicians are badly informed on this topic matter, and they act upon outdated information. Therefore other countries are now taking the lead in this revolution. Look at Memphis Meats in the US, or Supermeat in Israel. Also China, where the developments on in vitro meat are closely monitored, is interested. And Singapore has been eager to do things for years, but Europe is locked by the Novel foods administration.”“It feels as if I’m being held prisoner in Europe. I find it almost unsafe that the innovations that are needed (and of which I am convinced that they are necessary - I am a very positive person), are being held back under the guise of food and safety in Parma, where the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is established. It’s as if we have put up some sort of a ‘Trump wall’ to put down new ideas and possibilities, letting a lot of interesting and important innovations pass us by.”And it’s exactly this balustrade that led JUST to take the revolution eastwards: The company announced in February it will open its first in vitro meat manufacturing facility in Asia later this year. A big miss for Europe.

In vitro meat is a unique opportunity to reach our climate goals

“It’s a shame that the Netherlands missed out on this due to European legislation!” comments Koert van Mensvoort, joining the conversation. “It’s a unique opportunity to reach our climate goals,” he adds. “We want to excel at innovation and food productivity worldwide. And then this? It’s time we call upon politicians. It’s time for a change.”“Research shows that in vitro meat reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 90% compared to beef, as much less grain, land and water is needed than in traditional agriculture and livestock farming,” he adds.“The people must know about this too,” Ira nods approvingly.Therefore, Next Nature Network launched a petition. A petition for people interested in the developments around, are curious about, and looking to taste the in vitro meat.The goal? Parliamentary questions! The Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority should become an active contributor to innovation by testing the in vitro meat test packages (instead of sealing them) and give people the chance to taste it themselves. Do you agree?Sign the petition if you do - and also want to taste in vitro meat. I sure know I do. [post_title] => How the Dutch government is obstructing the advent of in vitro meat [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interview-ira-van-eelen [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 11:28:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 10:28:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81652 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 79337 [post_author] => 367 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 20:00:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:00:43 [post_content] => What to watch during the holiday season? Easy! What about Koert van Mensvoort's TED talk on Meat the Future? It will surely bring some food for thought to the dinnertable. Bon Appétit! [post_title] => Watch Koert's TED Talk on Meat the Future [post_excerpt] => We need to talk about the future of meat! Watch Next Nature Network director Koert van Mensvoort's TED talk on Meat the Future. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => koert-ted-talk-meat-future [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-02 16:30:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-02 15:30:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=79337/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 125665 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2019-11-07 12:55:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-07 11:55:51 [post_content] =>

We are proud to invite you to our largest showcase (so far), currently on display at OCT Art & Design in Shenzhen, China. Spanning across three floors, with a total surface of 1200 m2, this exhibition truly is a Next Nature showcase extraordinaire. From our Bistro In Vitro to HUBOT and the NANO Supermarket, to the Habitat VR; this is where you get to experience your favourite Next Nature projects in a completely new light!

Curious? Good! Get a first peek at the exhibition below.

A virtual tour, in pictures

Habitat VR

The Next Nature Habitat explores how we want to live in the near future. What does it mean to live in a next nature?

Bistro In Vitro

Our Bistro In Vitro presents 30 speculative recipes with lab-grown meat that could end up on your plate one day; street food-style!

NANO Supermarket

At the NANO Supermarket, you'll get the chance to see and interact with speculative products that may hit the shelves in the next ten years. Innovative and beautiful, uncanny and disturbing, but always specifically designed to provoke discussion, the products provide us with thought-provoking scenarios that help us decide what future we actually want.

HUBOT

The robots are coming! They are getting smarter, cheaper and more reliable. How long will I have my job before a robot steals it? The industrial revolution made muscular power redundant, the digital revolution automates our thinking. How to cope with that? Are we working against, or with the robot? HUBOT is world's first job agency for people and robots.

Pyramid of Technology

On the third floor, you'll find a workshop space fully dedicated to our Pyramid of Technology, the ultimate conceptual tool to visualize how technology becomes nature and what we can learn from that. It helps us to dream, build and live in our next nature — the nature caused by humans.

Meet the team

Let us give us give a round of applause to our dream team!

Plan your visit

What? Next Nature showcase XL
When? The expo runs until 1 February 2020
Where? OCT Art and Design Gallery, Shenzen, China

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