429 results for “Image-Consumption”

Fake-for-Real: Octopus Lips

Freya Hutchings
January 20th 2020

A recent lip filler trend blew up on social media. 'Devil lips', or Octopus lips, have attracted divided opinion online. When the body modification hit Instagram, some spectators found the change in natural lip structure oddly attractive, to others it seemed completely ridiculous, and one beauty expert point blank dismissed them as dangerous, criticizing anyone who promoted the trend.

It is still unclear whether the fillers are a photo shop stunt or even surgically possible. Yet, a number of online …

Have you thought about your social media death?

Freya Hutchings
January 13th 2020

Recently, Twitter announced it would be clearing all inactive accounts in an effort to free up dormant usernames and prevent the risk of old accounts being hacked. The new policy was set to wipe out all members inactive for six months or more. This news alarmed many users, who had been treating the accounts of deceased members as spaces of memorialization, as online tombstones where friends and relatives could grieve together.

It seems, when data meets human emotion, the worlds …

Instagram will remove filters promoting cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns

Cara Curtis
October 29th 2019

If your Instagram feed is anything like mine, it’s littered with timelapses of injected lip fillers, Kardashian-promoted beauty products, and Story filters that “enhance” your face. The subliminal pressure to be “perfect” is no longer subliminal, and it’s putting more more of a strain on young users more than ever. 

This is why Instagram is planning to remove all AR filters that depict or are associated with cosmetic surgery. Over the past few months, filters like “Plastica” — an effect …

‘(Un)postable’ is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media

Teyosh
April 26th 2019

When perceiving the world around us as a potential Instagram post, some thoughts, stories and situations can easily be packed into a tweet or a photo, while others are harder to mould into one. Remember when people were excited about how they would retell their story to friends when they meet? Now they have a chance to share it on the go.

To that end, perceiving life in a 'postable' manner can easily become addictive, as goes for the motivation …

AI creates images of delicious food that doesn’t exist

Tristan Greene
January 13th 2019

A team of researchers from Tel-Aviv University developed a neural network capable of reading a recipe and generating an image of what the finished, cooked product would look like. As if DeepFakes weren’t bad enough, now we can’t be sure the delicious food we see online is real.

The Tel-Aviv team, consisting of researchers Ori Bar El, Ori Licht, and Netanel Yosephian created their AI using a modified version of a generative adversarial network (GAN) called StackGAN V2 and 52K …

Teens are seeking cosmetic surgery to look like your favorite Snapchat filter

bryan clark
September 21st 2018

Cosmetic surgeons have always fielded seemingly odd requests to recreate body parts from celebrities: Angelina Jolie’s lips, David Beckham’s calve, or perhaps Salma Hayek’s breasts. Teens today, however, are a different breed. Whereas a decade or two ago, looking like their favorite celebrity — or at least the version that’s airbrushed to within an inch of reality — might have been the request du jour, today teens want to look like their favorite Snapchat filters.

Dr. Neelam Vashi, director of the Ethnic …

‘Halfseen’ means reading (the beginning of) a message without opening it

Teyosh
September 11th 2018

The appearance of “seen” has created a new phenomenon: opening messages partially, having a peek at the beginning of the message and assuming the rest so that the other person doesn’t get a “seen”. Also when writing a message, be aware of how your first sentence begins, because this is what the other person will be halfseening.

When “seen” first appeared, some thought they would have to answer messages immediately. However it didn’t make the culture of answering change, it …

Your Next Nature guide to Unseen 2018: When Records Melt

Meike Schipper
September 10th 2018

Images largely shape our experience of reality. Just consider how imagery of nature continues to rise in popularity: only a society no longer grounded in their natural landscape is able to treat such a scenery as art.

Longing for a nature long lost, we instead immersive ourselves in paintings to appreciate the quality of untouched landscapes, we simulate snowfall for skiing experience, and we keep a piece of glacier ice as a relic of a different time. These natural and …

This Twitterbot imagines the Fanta flavors that will fuel your summer

Kelly Streekstra
June 8th 2018

Today, artificial intelligence is doing all kinds of things: It can write an episode of game of thrones, it may revolutionize the teaching industry, and it's drawing new streets from its artificial memory. Now, it's imagining Fanta flavors. In our media-saturated society, it can be hard to see things for what they really are. Welcome to the world of Image Consumption.…

Games become jobs: Looking through the eye of the submarine with an X-Box controller

Kelly Streekstra
April 10th 2018

Submarines feature a special device called a periscope that allows people inside the submarine to see what's going on above water. Controlling such an eye requires hours of training, and costs a whopping $38.000 per ship. However, the new generation sailors saw fit for a millennial-ready tool: the 30$ X-box controller from that children's’ playstore around the corner. …

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A recent lip filler trend blew up on social media. 'Devil lips', or Octopus lips, have attracted divided opinion online. When the body modification hit Instagram, some spectators found the change in natural lip structure oddly attractive, to others it seemed completely ridiculous, and one beauty expert point blank dismissed them as dangerous, criticizing anyone who promoted the trend.

It is still unclear whether the fillers are a photo shop stunt or even surgically possible. Yet, a number of online influencers soon appeared to be sporting the new look - and we cannot underestimate their impact in the offline world. Just last year Instagram announced it would remove a range of filters that promote cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns.

Additionally, plastic surgeons have revealed how their clients have not only been motivated by Instagram images, but use them as a visual reference for their requests. Also, remember how in 2018 US teens were seeking cosmetic surgery to look like their favorite Snapchat filter? What instances like this reveal is how, once again, beauty ideals find their way from online to offline spaces.

So, what are the limits of our abilities to transform ourselves and escape our biological constraints? Has the 'Instagram face',with its symmetrical, full-pouted lips, become an exhausted and predictable plastic surgery narrative? Does the devil/octopus lip trend indicate the beginning of new cosmetic preference that goes beyond exaggerated human characteristics, and towards the aesthetics of other-worldly creatures?

Release your inner devil, or octopus, it seems. Are new body modifications blurring the real with the fantastical, and will these transgressive aesthetics lead to more variety in self-expression, or just a different kind of homogeneity? What will the future of humans look like? Less human caricature and more species ambiguous? Only time will tell...

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Recently, Twitter announced it would be clearing all inactive accounts in an effort to free up dormant usernames and prevent the risk of old accounts being hacked. The new policy was set to wipe out all members inactive for six months or more. This news alarmed many users, who had been treating the accounts of deceased members as spaces of memorialization, as online tombstones where friends and relatives could grieve together.

It seems, when data meets human emotion, the worlds of the living and dead collide and even change places. Given the complexity of such situations, general rules cannot be applied. Just as it is unacceptable to bulldoze a graveyard without warning, Twitter needed to rethink its policy. The social media platform soon backtracked on its decision and stated that [Twitter] "will not be removing any inactive accounts until we create a new way for people to memorize accounts.”

Thankful twitter users expressed their relief:

“I’m literally sobbing...thank you so much, thank you”

“there are accounts where the person is now deceased and ppl like to look at them from time to time.”

“Thank you! my brother passed away. We wanted to have access to tweets to use for a memorial book.”

“Yes, we have a duty to preserve internet history and create lasting memories online”

Twitter responds to complaints about deleting the accounts of deceased users.

What happens to your social media after you die?

As the Twitter controversy has revealed, many people return to the pages of lost loved ones to post supportive messages and relive memories recorded online. Social media accounts give grieving friends and family a chronological source from which to reflect. Indeed, Facebook timelines can form an intricate record of a dead users life moments, the people they knew, the times they shared. Their profiles exist as a preserved space in which a person appears to live on.

However, like a person in real life that is unaware of a death, social media is not resistant to awkward, jarring moments of insensitivity. If left untouched, the accounts of deceased people continue to interact with their virtual circle through automated social media functions. This means reminders of birthdays, memories, pending pokes, and that the dead will continue to eerily pop up on your ‘suggested friends’ list. You may receive a shock when providers such as WhatsApp automatically suggest you message a friend who has passed away.

To avoid these triggering moments, Facebook now allows family and friends to convert the accounts of dead people into memorial pages. This process transforms a regular profile into a locked and simplified version, with the word ‘remembering’ placed before the name of the account.

Alternatively, you can chose to appoint a legacy contact, who can access and manage your profile after you die. Twitter and Instagram allow a friend or relative to have a profile deleted after showing an official document that proves the death of the account holder.

Film critic Richard Ebert sends tweets from beyond the grave, with the help of his living partner, Chaz.

Yet, you don’t have to die digitally. You might entrust someone to communicate on your behalf by sharing your login details before you pass. Take for example, Chaz, the wife of successful film critic Roger Ebert, who managed his digital afterlife on Twitter. An agreement made prior to his death meant that she continued to post from his account. Shortly after his passing, Chaz published a pre-prepared tweet from Ebert: ‘Even when the theater has gone dark, the story is still alive in you.’

These profound 'last words' were a comfort for friends, family and followers; a testament of his approach to life delivered from beyond the grave.

The birth of online executors

There are also a plethora of online services that claim to make the transition from offline to online death a smooth one. The website ‘If I die’ lets you record a goodbye video that appointed trustees can publish on Facebook. Failed start up ‘virtual eternity’ created ‘intelligent’ avatars that could live on after you die. Teesside University lecturer Simon McKeown also predicts computers will keep us alive in avatar form.

Simon McKeown predicts a future where where life after death is made possible using online avatars.

An app called ‘DeadSocial’ allows you to schedule messages to post on Facebook and Twitter in the aftermath of your physical death. Additionally, services such as ‘LivesOn’ and 'Eter9' claim to have developed AI technology capable of identifying and remembering your chat preferences, enabling you to communicate with friends in your online afterlife.

These services may sound like morbid jokes, but they exist alongside legal provisions that have been recommended on a governmental level. In the US, Florida's Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act has made it legally possible to transfer digital possessions of the dead to the living. In Dubai, as of July 2019, a court ruling clarified that wishes for social media accounts can only be acted upon if permission is granted in a legally binding will. 

So, have you thought about your online death? Maybe you should. Your social media persona will continue to live on after you die, and may remain one of the most detailed records of your life. In what virtual form would you like to exist after you have gone, if any?

Are social media becoming the new graveyard?

Incidences such as the Twitter account clearing backlash, and special policies dedicated to dealing with death online, form an important example of how social media binds the dead and the living, how online platforms are adapting their actions to address offline tragedies. Has there been a transformation in the way we grieve and the places in which we do it?

Image via VOA/Techtonics/M. Sandeen

Certainly, social media is becoming a key part of the process. Although we may avoid thinking about it, dead Facebook users will soon outnumber the living, thanks to our rising, aging and increasingly social-media savvy population. Communities of mourning will continue to gather around these virtual spaces, interacting with the “living” profiles of the dead. Social media sites are morphing into sacred tombs where the records of an offline existence are kept alive.

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If your Instagram feed is anything like mine, it’s littered with timelapses of injected lip fillers, Kardashian-promoted beauty products, and Story filters that “enhance” your face. The subliminal pressure to be “perfect” is no longer subliminal, and it’s putting more more of a strain on young users more than ever

This is why Instagram is planning to remove all AR filters that depict or are associated with cosmetic surgery. Over the past few months, filters like “Plastica” — an effect that gives you extreme plastic surgery — have become increasingly popular, even viral. But with their rapid popularity comes growing concerns over the impact they may have on young people’s body image.

Instagram-filter-cosmetic-surgery

Back in August, Facebook announced its (previously invite-only) tool to create face filters — Spark AR Creators – was open to the public, allowing anyone to create and publish effects for use in Instagram Stories. With this came a flood of more problematic filters, such as “Fix Me” an effect which illustrates the pen-markings of pre-surgery, including a nose job, eyebrow lift, and cheek fillers.

Although Spark AR didn’t design the filter, it did approve the filter to be used by its one billion users on Instagram Stories. A post published by Spark AR Creators stated that it wants its filters “to be a positive experience and are re-evaluating its existing policies as they relate to well-being.” While its policies are being reviewed and updated, Facebook is removing existing filters like “Fix Me,” and postponing the approval of any similar new effects.

This news comes shortly after Facebook and Instagram announced they will tighten their policy on posts related to cosmetic surgery and weight loss products by hiding related posts from users known to be aged under 18. This update includes the removal of any content that makes a “miraculous” claim about a diet or weight-loss product linked to a commercial offer, such as a discount code or affiliate link.

It’s reassuring to see Instagram and Facebook take responsibility for what they’ve been hosting, but it remains to be seen how proactively they will respond to issues of mental and physical health in the future.

This article is republished from The Next Web under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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When perceiving the world around us as a potential Instagram post, some thoughts, stories and situations can easily be packed into a tweet or a photo, while others are harder to mould into one. Remember when people were excited about how they would retell their story to friends when they meet? Now they have a chance to share it on the go.

To that end, perceiving life in a 'postable' manner can easily become addictive, as goes for the motivation behind the moment of going somewhere or doing something; it engages us to interact with our gadgets—rather than our immediate environment.

(Un)postable is the quality of being (un)suitable for a post on social media.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

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A team of researchers from Tel-Aviv University developed a neural network capable of reading a recipe and generating an image of what the finished, cooked product would look like. As if DeepFakes weren’t bad enough, now we can’t be sure the delicious food we see online is real.

The Tel-Aviv team, consisting of researchers Ori Bar El, Ori Licht, and Netanel Yosephian created their AI using a modified version of a generative adversarial network (GAN) called StackGAN V2 and 52K image/recipe combinations from the gigantic recipe1M dataset.

Basically, the team developed an AI that can take almost any list of ingredients and instructions, and figure out what the finished food product looks like.

Researcher Ori Bar El told The Next Web:

"[It] all started when I asked my grandmother for a recipe of her legendary fish cutlets with tomato sauce. Due to her advanced age she didn’t remember the exact recipe. So, I was wondering if I can build a system that given a food image, can output the recipe. After thinking about this task for a while I concluded that it is too hard for a system to get an exact recipe with real quantities and with “hidden” ingredients such as salt, pepper, butter, flour etc.

Then, I wondered if I can do the opposite, instead. Namely, generating food images based on the recipes.  We believe that this task is very challenging to be accomplished by humans, all the more so for computers. Since most of the current AI systems try replace human experts in tasks that are easy for humans, we thought that it would be interesting to solve a kind of task that is even beyond humans’ ability. As you can see, it can be done in a certain extent of success."

The researchers also acknowledge, in their white paper, that the system isn’t perfect quite yet:

"It is worth mentioning that the quality of the images in the recipe1M dataset is low in comparison to the images in CUB and Oxford102 datasets. This is reflected by lots of blurred images with bad lighting conditions, ”porridge-like images” and the fact that the images are not square shaped (which makes it difficult to train the models). This fact might give an explanation to the fact that both models succeeded in generating ”porridge-like” food images (e.g. pasta, rice, soups, salad) but struggles to generate food images that have a distinctive shape (e.g. hamburger, chicken, drinks)."

This is the only AI of its kind that we know of, so don’t expect this to be an app on your phone anytime soon. But, the writing is on the wall. And, if it’s a recipe, the Tel-Aviv team’s AI can turn it into an image that looks good enough that, according to the research paper, humans sometimes prefer it over a photo of the real thing.

What do you think?

The team intends to continue developing the system, hopefully extending into domains beyond food. Ori Bar El told us:

We plan to extend the work by training our system on the rest of the recipes (we have about 350k more images), but the problem is that the current dataset is of low quality. We have not found any other available dataset suitable for our needs, but we might build a dataset on our own that contains children’s books text and corresponding images.

These talented researchers may have damned foodies on Instagram to a world where we can’t quite be sure whether what we’re drooling over is real, or some robot’s vision of a souffle`.

It’s probably a good time for us all to go out into the real world and stick our faces in some actual food. You know, the kind created by scientists and prepared by robots.

This story is republished from The Next Web under a Creative Commons license. Read the original piece here.

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Cosmetic surgeons have always fielded seemingly odd requests to recreate body parts from celebrities: Angelina Jolie’s lips, David Beckham’s calve, or perhaps Salma Hayek’s breasts. Teens today, however, are a different breed. Whereas a decade or two ago, looking like their favorite celebrity — or at least the version that’s airbrushed to within an inch of reality — might have been the request du jour, today teens want to look like their favorite Snapchat filters.

Dr. Neelam Vashi, director of the Ethnic Skin Center at Boston Medical Center coined the term “Snapchat dysmorphia” to explain the worrying new trend. Teens, she says in a recently published paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s Facial Plastic Surgery, are increasingly altering people‘s perception of beauty worldwide. “A little adjusting on Facetune can smoothen out skin, and make teeth look whiter and eyes and lips bigger. These filters have become the norm.”

And it’s beginning to lead to real issues. Body dysmorphia, for example, is a condition that involves “excessive preoccupation with a perceived flaw in appearance, classified on the obsessive-compulsive spectrum.” Snapchat dysphoria is an offshoot of the same condition. Teens, who once focused on things like the size of their nose, for example, are now hypercritical of completely normal lines, blemishes, and imperfections masked by Snapchat filters.

While surgeons are hesitant to complete these types of procedures on still-developing children, the American Medical Academy of Facial and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery says 55 percent of clinicians saw patients who “wanted to look better in their selfies” in 2017. This signifies a 13 percent increase from the previous year.

Vashi told Inverse that rhinoplasty — a common nose job where surgeons shave the bump and bridge of some noses — used to be fairly common. Now, people are inquiring about what it would take to look more like they’d see themselves when applying the butterfly or flower crown filter. “People have asked me to reshape their nose, or give them fuller lips. But it’s usually asymmetry they want corrected,” she said.

Asymmetric faces, by any measure, are perfectly normal. Symmetric faces, however, are those often seen as the most attractive. And while Snapchat doesn’t make asymmetric faces more symmetric, it does reduce the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and blemishes by smoothing and brightening the underlying tissue, thereby reducing the appearance of asymmetry in certain faces.

And this symmetry, apparently, has some willing to undergo expensive procedures in an attempt to look more like an idealized version of themselves.

This story is published in partnership with The Next Web. Read the original piece here. Image via Vox.com.

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The appearance of “seen” has created a new phenomenon: opening messages partially, having a peek at the beginning of the message and assuming the rest so that the other person doesn’t get a “seen”. Also when writing a message, be aware of how your first sentence begins, because this is what the other person will be halfseening.

When “seen” first appeared, some thought they would have to answer messages immediately. However it didn’t make the culture of answering change, it only made visible what we already knew: we don’t always reply straight away. While it became more and more acceptable not to reply immediately, the technique of halfseening is commonly used.

For those who don’t find the beginning of the message to be enough, but still don’t like to reply straight away, you may benefit from 'seen' blocking apps.

From the Dictionary of Online Behavior; a project by NNN members TeYosh. Over the next few weeks, we will weekly publish a new word that describes behavior that has emerged on social networks and has changed our way of communication.

[post_title] => 'Halfseen' means reading (the beginning of) a message without opening it [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => halfseen [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-07 12:55:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-07 11:55:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=91103 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 91097 [post_author] => 1666 [post_date] => 2018-09-10 15:47:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-10 14:47:23 [post_content] =>

Images largely shape our experience of reality. Just consider how imagery of nature continues to rise in popularity: only a society no longer grounded in their natural landscape is able to treat such a scenery as art.

Longing for a nature long lost, we instead immersive ourselves in paintings to appreciate the quality of untouched landscapes, we simulate snowfall for skiing experience, and we keep a piece of glacier ice as a relic of a different time. These natural and artificial landscapes blend together in When Records Melt, an exhibition to increase awareness of global climate change dangers through various photographic interpretations.

The exhibition is the result of a joint effort between Unseen Amsterdam and Project Pressure, a charity organization dedicated to documenting the world’s vanishing glaciers. For Unseen, Project Pressure selected works from international artists that focus on raising awareness through a variety of photographic interpretations, depicting issues surrounding the global environment in a new and inspiring context, and engage a large audience to inspire behavioural change — because a picture is worth a thousand words. Here are three works you shouldn’t miss:

Glacier du Rhône by Noémie Goudal, 2016

Melting glaciers are uniquely visual evidence of the pressing, yet mainly invisible issue of climate change. The poetic resemblance between a photograph and a vanishing glacier is striking, as both could be regarded as visual traces of something once there was. This double layer of representation becomes tangible in the work of French artist Noémie Goudal.

Goudal travelled to the Glacier du Rhône in Switzerland and created an on-site installation. The work consists of a large photograph of the glacier printed on biodegradable paper that slowly blends into its surrounding. The disintegration of the physical image emphasizes the intrinsically volatile nature of both the photograph and the glacier: “It’s such a strong, solid landscape when you look at it, and with the knowledge that it is disintegrating, that sense of fragility comes back into play.”

Mount Rainier by Peter Funch, 2016

The regression of glaciers preceded the development of color photography, which means that photography has only been able to capture glaciers as an object of abatement. The work Imperfect Atlas by the Danish photographer Peter Funch plays with the notions of physical decay and regression, by using RGB-tricolour separation to create his images; a technique that came about during the Industrial Revolution. Funch explores the meaning of landscapes as touristic hotspots, and positions the photographs next to historic postcards to showcase the gap between reality and simulation of the places we long for. Hello from postcard nature!

Rhône Glacier by Simon Norfolk and Klaus Thymann, 2018

This haunting image is created by Simon Norfolk and Klaus Thymann. A small business has draped a thermal blanket over a part of the glacier to prevent it from melting and to keep their touristic grotto in place. It's old nature covered up by next nature. The glacier has become a commodity, and the result is a surreal, nearly abstract image of a landscape that once was natural. The title of the work, Shroud, explicitly refers to the inescapable future of the landscape: “There is something insane about trying to reverse the inevitable. The gesture is as forlorn and doomed as the glacier itself.”

When Records Melt is part of Unseen 2018 and runs from the 21st to the 23rd of September. Visit unseenamsterdam.com for more information.

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For the lactose intolerants

For the wetwalkers

For the Tinder daters

For the denim lovers

For the believers

For the superorganisms

For the big wave surfers

For the dreamers

Peculiar images via @fakefantas. Looking for more peculiar images? Join NNN and get weekly images delivered to your inbox! [post_title] => This Twitterbot imagines the Fanta flavors that will fuel your summer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fake-fanta [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-08 10:31:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-08 09:31:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81823 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 81206 [post_author] => 1510 [post_date] => 2018-04-10 15:25:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-10 14:25:31 [post_content] => Submarines feature a special device called a periscope that allows people inside the submarine to see what's going on above water. Controlling such an eye requires hours of training, and costs a whopping $38.000 per ship. However, the new generation sailors saw fit for a millennial-ready tool: the 30$ X-box controller from that children's’ playstore around the corner. When gaming, you’re looking at a virtual world, a simulation of fiction, or perhaps another reality. But for these sailors, the gaming-interface now shows the real world: an eye on the surface, moved with the familiar taps and twists of their childhood-controllers. Training times for these sailors decreased to minutes. We all know how they work, why wouldn’t we apply them beyond our comfy couches, right?Video game controllers are just one of many innovations the Navy is using as it transitions into the 21st century. It’s already using virtual-reality simulators to train sailors, and exploring technology like 3D printing and robotic underwater drones. Games become jobs! [post_title] => Games become jobs: Looking through the eye of the submarine with an X-Box controller [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => x-box-controllers-operate-submarine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-17 11:38:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-17 10:38:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nextnature.net/?p=81206 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [post_category] => 0 ))[post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 126360 [post_author] => 2194 [post_date] => 2020-01-20 16:37:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-20 15:37:14 [post_content] =>

A recent lip filler trend blew up on social media. 'Devil lips', or Octopus lips, have attracted divided opinion online. When the body modification hit Instagram, some spectators found the change in natural lip structure oddly attractive, to others it seemed completely ridiculous, and one beauty expert point blank dismissed them as dangerous, criticizing anyone who promoted the trend.

It is still unclear whether the fillers are a photo shop stunt or even surgically possible. Yet, a number of online influencers soon appeared to be sporting the new look - and we cannot underestimate their impact in the offline world. Just last year Instagram announced it would remove a range of filters that promote cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns.

Additionally, plastic surgeons have revealed how their clients have not only been motivated by Instagram images, but use them as a visual reference for their requests. Also, remember how in 2018 US teens were seeking cosmetic surgery to look like their favorite Snapchat filter? What instances like this reveal is how, once again, beauty ideals find their way from online to offline spaces.

So, what are the limits of our abilities to transform ourselves and escape our biological constraints? Has the 'Instagram face',with its symmetrical, full-pouted lips, become an exhausted and predictable plastic surgery narrative? Does the devil/octopus lip trend indicate the beginning of new cosmetic preference that goes beyond exaggerated human characteristics, and towards the aesthetics of other-worldly creatures?

Release your inner devil, or octopus, it seems. Are new body modifications blurring the real with the fantastical, and will these transgressive aesthetics lead to more variety in self-expression, or just a different kind of homogeneity? What will the future of humans look like? Less human caricature and more species ambiguous? Only time will tell...

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